1. LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
1.1. COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
1.2. CONDITIONS OF USE
The user accepts all responsibility for the use of this information & accepts all liability associated with such use.
 
2. Site Information - About the Knowledge Base, Ticket System etc
2.1. Site Information - How To

 

2.1.1. Priority Response - Help & "How To"
2.1.1.1. New User - Registration for Priority Response
If you HAVE NOT registered previously to use our Priority Response system please do this:
  • Visit www.richmondrc.com,
    • > Enter the Site,
    • > Support Services,
    • > Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You,
    • Priority Response Register Now for Priority Treatment [New Window]
      • Enter all of your contact information into the template
        • Capitalize the first letters of your Name, City, State, Country as you would normally
        • Use your formal first name not a contraction or nick name. i.e. Robert... not Bob, Rebecca... not Becky
      • We strongly suggest the following approach to creating login's and passwords:
        • For your password and login use all lower case as in xxx not XXX or XxX
        • For your login (sometimes referred to as user name), use your email address (all lower case)
        • For your password... use your formal first name (all lower case) followed immedately by a string of 4+ digits that mean something to you. i.e. robert23456 or rebecca78923
        • Write down your login and password now! Exactly as you created it! Keep it safe and private.
      • > Save
        • You will see a screen message saying you are successfully registered.
        • If the system reports an error and will not accept your login and password it is likely because you have a login and/or password that is already in the system.
      • > Close
      • Close your browser
        • Hint: Use the browser menu bar > File (top left) > Close), or
        • Hint: > The X in the top right corner of the browser window frame.
      • This completes the one time registration process.
        • Hint: You will not normally have to do this again unless you lose your login and password information.
      • We suggest logging out and then logging back in.  
        • Hint: This ensures a clean exit and restart after the registration process.

 

2.1.1.2. Priority Response Tickets - Help & "How To"
2.1.1.2.1. Priority Response Tickets - Add a New Ticket - How To

Question: How do I Add a Ticket using the Priority Response system?

Answer: 

To Add (open, create) a (new) Ticket using the Priority Response system please read the following information carefully.   

A. Introduction

B. The Procedure - Step by Step

Step 1: Access the Priority Response system

Step 2: Identify Yourself

Step 3: Add a Ticket

C. Troubleshooting

Please review all information from beginning to end before proceeding. Look over the Troubleshooting section  as well. This will point out pitfalls and questions that have arisen in the past to help you stay clear of common problems and/or resolve them quickly.


 

A. Introduction

Work with TIckets using the Prioirity Response system. Our Response Center receives IMMEDIATE notification whenever you Add a Ticket. Please do NOT NOT NOT use eMail to add a ticket, reply to, edit, respond to notifications about or otherwise work with Tickets.  The Priority Response system provides the "tools" to add and manage Tickets and ensures that your Ticket issue is resolved as quickly as possible.

  • These instructions assume that you have a basic knowledge of how to work with a computer equipped with a graphical user interface (GUI) such as Windows and that you are familiar with an internet browser such as Internet Explorer (IE). If you do not have these prerequisites you may wish to get someone to assist you.
    • In cases where we give hints to the operation of the computer, the operating system or the browser, these hints are based on the assumption that you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) as your browser on an Intel based PC running Windows XP. Windows 2000 and versions of Windows later than XP, generally are similar in operation but details may vary slightly from version to version.  
  • It may be helpful to have these instructions in a printed form. For novice users we strongly suggest printing these instructions. To print, look for the three icons in the top right of this article, they are near the Logout and Help buttons. If you cannot see these icons or buttons use your mouse to scroll the screen view further to the right. Mouse over the icons and you will see what they do. Click on the middle icon to print out this information. Then respond to the prompts and printing instructions provided by your computer.
  • Within this document
    • The ">" symbol means "click on".
    • Information tagged as Hints may be unnessary for experienced users.
  • These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.


B: The Procedure - Step by Step

Please Do Step 1 ... then Step 2 ...  then Step 3.
  • Step 1:  Access the Priority Response system.
  • Step 2:  Identify Yourself
  • Step 3:  Add a Ticket using the Priority Response system.


 

Step 1:  Access the Priority Response System.

  • > www.richmondrc.com
    • Hint: > means "Click On"
    • Hint: Or type www.richmondrc.com into the address bar of your web browser and press the Enter key.
  • > Welcome
  • > Support Services
    • Hint: See the middle of the menu bar near the top.
  • > Priority Response - VERY FAST - We respond within 1 Business Day [New Window]
    • Hint: Look about 3-4 lines down from the top 
    • Recommendation > [New Window] to open in a New Window


Step 2: Identify Yourself

The next steps depend on if you HAVE or HAVE NOT registered previously to use our Priority Response system. Normally Step 2.2 is only done once... i.e. when first using the Priority Response system.

  • If you HAVE registered previously please follow the instructions in 2.1
  • If you HAVE NOT registered previously please follow the instructions in 2.2

2.1) If you HAVE registered previously to use our Priority Response system continue here:

  • Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Login box about 1-2 inches down near the left edge below the Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE title.
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendation your Login will be your email address that you supplied the first time when you registered to use the Priority Response system.  
    • Hint: Type your login. (usually all lower case)
    • Hint: If you do not have a login and password, follow the New User? First Time? Takes 1 Minute! Immediate Setup! link
  • Password
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Password box
    • Hint: Look about an inch to the right.
    • Hint: Type your password
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendations, your password will be all lower case text followed by some numbers
  • > Go
    • Hint: You may get a prompt from Windows at this point asking you if want Windows to remember this password. > Yes or > No.
      • Hint: Choosing Yes will avoid having to re-enter the password in the future
  • > Priority Response (Tickets)
    • Hint: See the middle area of the menu bar near the top
  • See Section 3 below

2.2) If you HAVE NOT registered previously to use our Priority Response system please do this:

  • Consult the related document (see below) entitled "New User - Registration for Priority Response" and follow the instructions there.
  • After Registering if you have not logged out and logged back in we recommend that you do so.
  • Then Go back to Step 1 and then go to step 2.1 and Step 3.
    • Hint: This ensures a clean exit and restart after the registration process.


 

Step 3:  Add a Ticket. 

  • > Add a Ticket
    • Hint: look near left side of screen about 1-2 inches from the top
  • Provide a brief Summary of Feedback, Problem or Question
    • Hint: Move your cursor the blank box below the title Summary of Feedback, Problem or Question
    • Hint: Type the Summary information
    • Hint: i.e. Shipping Damage, How do I do such and such etc
    • Hint: If you put the product name (i.e. Apache) or part number (i.e. VMA-A140X) in your Summary or can describe the problem relative to common modelling terms (i.e. CG)  or components (i.e. covering), you may be able to get the answer you are looking for by then clicking on Search in Articles which will search our Knowledge Base for articles that may be able to help you.  
  • Select the Product from the product pop down menu
    • Hint: Click the down arrow and scroll the slider bar to see the products.
    • Hint: Choosing the product will help speed up processing of your Ticket. If your product is not shown, choose from one of the generic (i.e ...OTHER) or choose Not Selected.
  • Select the Category by scrolling the slider bar.
    • Hint: Choosing the category will help speed up processing of your Ticket. If no category is suitable for your purposes choose Not Selected.
    • Hint: i.e. PROBLEM - Shipment - - , Question after Purchase etc.
  • Provide a Description of your problem, issue or question.
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank box below the title Description
    • Hint: Type the Description.
    • Hint: Include information about where you made your purchase.
    • Hint: Include your customer number if known. It helps identify you
    • Hint: Include your invoice number if known. It helps identify your purchase.
    • Hint: i.e. My customer number (top center of my invoice) is #####. The invoice number (top right of my invoice) is #####. My whatchmacallit has arrived and I have inspected it and found that suchandsuch is broken.  I have read over all of the Read Me First documents that came with my invoice and the product manuals etc and would like to know what to do next
  • > Send
    • Hint: > Send & Attach if you can attach pictures of the problem or pictures that help illustrate your issue using your digital camera  
  • > Logout
    • Hint: The Logout button is located in the menu bar near the top of the Priority Response Window. Look for the menu bar below the Graphic labelled KNOWLEDGE BASE... the first entry (leftmost) in the menu bar is Articles, then Most Popular Articles... keep going towards the right looking for Logout.
    • Hint: You may need to scroll the screen view further to the right in order to see the Logout button in the Priority Response menu bar.


 

C: Troubleshooting

1. These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.

2. Write down your login and password information exactly as you entered it and as you are entering it. Safeguard this carefully. The vast majority of inquiries we get are from people who have lost or forgotten their login and password.

We strongly recommend:

  • Use the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) method but something that is unique to you.
  • Use all lower case letters as in xxx not XXX. Do not mix case like AbCe. You will forget if you mix case.
  • For your login (sometimes referred to as username)... use your email address
  • For your password... use your formal first name followed immediately by a string of 4+ digits that mean something to you.
    • Some examples of passwords appear below:
      • david1963  as in david not dave and as in 1963 for year of birth
      • robert19581126 as in robert not bob and 19581126 as in YYYY (year) MM (month) DD (day) i.e. in this case 1958 Nov 26th.
      • rebecca94302 as in rebecca not becky and as in 94302 your zipcode
      • richard1969 as in richard not rick and as in 1969 the year man first landed on the moon

3. Reboot from COLD COLD COLD: Sometimes computers, web browsers and web browser "cookies" get muddled up. This is particularly the case with older computer systems having limited memory and/or older versions of operating systems such as Windows 98. You can spend a great deal of time mucking around trying to solve problems and never actually figure it out.

Before you drive yourself crazy, start tearing boards out of your computer or reloading software...

  • Save all your unsaved computer files.
  • Close your browser and all other software applications.
  • Shut all hardware down. Everything... computer, monitor, router, modem, power... the whole works.
  • Wait til the computer is making no noise at all and then:
    • Power up your modem and/or router
    • Power up network switch, hub etc
    • Power up your monitor
    • Power up your computer
  • Fire up your internet browser before doing anything else with your computer.
  • Try to access Priority Response.  

4. I Added a Ticket. The Response Center received my Ticket and asked me for some information. I sent the information back to them by email but never heard anything more. What's going on?

    • Well, you used email to manage a Ticket. It likely got mixed in with the several hundred general sales emails, spam, come-ons for get rich quick schemes, cheap drugs and other nefarious drivel. Our sales staff may or may not see it and forward it to our Response Center. It could take days or it may never happen at all.
    • If this happens to you, we suggest going back to the Ticket system and adding your information again within the Ticket system.
    • Please remember the following:
      • Work with TIckets using the Prioirity Response system. Our Response Center receives IMMEDIATE notification whenever you Add a Ticket. Please do NOT NOT NOT use eMail to add a ticket, reply to, edit, respond to notifications about or otherwise work with Tickets.  The Priority Response system provides the "tools" to add and manage Tickets and ensures that your Ticket issue is resolved as quickly as possible.
2.1.1.2.2. Priority Response Tickets - Work with an Existing Ticket - How To

Please do not reply to, add to, edit or otherwise work with Tickets by eMail or send an eMail in response to any eMail notification about a Ticket.

  • It may be helpful when working with Tickets to have these instructions in a printed form. To print, look for the three icons in the top right of this article, just below the Logout button. Mouse over the icons and you will see what they do. Click on the middle icon to print out this information.
  • See below for how to work with a Ticket.
  • Working within the Priority Response Ticket System helps to ensure that your issue continues to be expedited.
  • Within this document the ">" symbol means "click on".

To Edit, View or add a Note (such as a reply or information) or Attach a file such as a picture to a Ticket please:

  • Go To: www.richmondrc.com
  • > Enter the Site
  • > Support Services (see the middle of the menu bar near the top)
  • > Priority Response - VERY FAST
    • Hint: Look about 3-4 lines down from the top
    • Recommendation: > [New Window] to open in a New Window
  • Login for Priority Response (usually your email address)
  • Enter your password that you set up when you registered.
  • Click on Priority Response (Tickets) near the center of the top menu bar

You will then see a list of your Tickets. If not then look at (but don't click) the Add a Ticket button. Directly below it is a Status control. Use the down arrow and change Status to All. Then go all the way to the right and click on the button marked Apply. This will reveal all of your Tickets regardless of their Status.

 

The Ticket cue is stacked with the most recent Ticket at the top. Look near the left margin and you will find the column header labels “View”,  “Attach”, “Notes” and “#” and icons related to these labels. (Hint: The icons will confirm their actions if you mouse over them and pause briefly.)

 

Locate the Ticket # that you want to work with.  

To View the Ticket click the View Icon associated with this Ticket

 

To Attach a file (such as a picture) click the Attach Icon. Then browse to your file (one file at a time), click Upload. Repeat if you have another file to Attach.

 

To add a Note (such as an answer to a question we may have or to add additional info) click the Notes Icon. Type your Note, click Save. Repeat if another Note.

 

After you have Viewed, Attached file(s) and/or added Note(s), if you need to do more, simply repeat this process.

 

When you are finished for now, Logout via the Logout button at the right end of the top menu bar.

 

Please note that we receive immediate notification of any input you provide to a Ticket. This ensures that your issue continues to get Priority treatment.

Please do not reply to, add to, edit or otherwise work with Tickets by eMail or send an eMail in response to any eMail notification about a Ticket.  Working within the Ticket System helps to ensure that your issue continues to be expedited.  eMails end up in our general eMail cue mixed with reams of junk mail and spam.

2.1.1.3. Notification Service - Subscribe Now
For automated update notifications please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service
 
2.1.1.3.1. Priority Response Notification Service - Help & "How To"
The Priority Response Notification Service within our Knowledge Base provides registered Priority Response members with the option to automatically be informed about changes or additions to articles and/or sub-articles in our Knowledge Base.

When changes or additions are detected to subscribed articles, the Priority Response Notification Service checks an internal list of registered Priority Response members who have subscribed to these Articles and automatically sends an email to the subscribers who have indicated they wish to be notified. 

The Notification Service is an extremely powerful feature available to our registered Priority Response members.

Here are some typical examples of use:

  • You've just bought one of our products and want to watch for updates to the Read Me First documents to ensure you are always up to date.
  • A user of one of our products offers up a suggestion for making assembly easier or enhancing the performance. We create a sub-Article and append this sub-Article under the existing main Article for the product. All Priority Response members who have subscribed to the product Article and its sub-Articles will automatically be emailed a link to the new information.
  • Any Article and/or sub-Article can be subscribed to. If you want to keep up to date without having to periodically poke thru the information on your own, register for Priority Response now and you'll be ready to subscribe to the information of your choice!

 

2.1.1.3.1.1. Priority Response Notification Service - How To Subscribe

Question: How do I Subscribe to the Notification Service using the Priority Response system?

Answer: 

To subscribe to the our Priority Response Notification Service please read the following information carefully.   

A. Introduction

B. The Procedure - Step by Step

Step 1: Access the Priority Response Notification Service

Step 2: Identify Yourself

Step 3: Subscribe to an Article &/or sub-Article

C. Troubleshooting

Please review all information from beginning to end before proceeding. Look over the Troubleshooting section  as well. This will point out pitfalls and questions that have arisen in the past to help you stay clear of common problems and/or resolve them quickly.


 

A. Introduction

  • These instructions assume that you have a basic knowledge of how to work with a computer equipped with a graphical user interface (GUI) such as Windows and that you are familiar with an internet browser such as Internet Explorer (IE). If you do not have these prerequisites you may wish to get someone to assist you.
    • In cases where we give hints to the operation of the computer, the operating system or the browser, these hints are based on the assumption that you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) as your browser on an Intel based PC running Windows XP. Windows 2000 and versions of Windows later than XP, generally are similar in operation but details may vary slightly from version to version.  
  • It may be helpful to have these instructions in a printed form. For novice users we strongly suggest printing these instructions. To print, look for the three icons in the top right of this article, they are near the Logout and Help buttons. If you cannot see these icons or buttons use your mouse to scroll the screen view further to the right. Mouse over the icons and you will see what they do. Click on the middle icon to print out this information. Then respond to the prompts and printing instructions provided by your computer.
  • Within this document
    • The ">" symbol means "click on".
    • Information tagged as Hints may be unnessary for experienced users.
  • These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.


B: The Procedure - Step by Step

Please Do Step 1 ... then Step 2 ...  then Step 3.
  • Step 1:  Access the Priority Response Notificaition Service.
  • Step 2:  Identify Yourself
  • Step 3:  Subscribe to an Article &/or sub-Article.


 

Step 1:  Access the Priority Response Notification Service.

  • > www.richmondrc.com
    • Hint: > means "Click On"
    • Hint: Or type www.richmondrc.com into the address bar of your web browser and press the Enter key.
  • > Welcome
  • > Support Services
    • Hint: See the middle of the menu bar near the top.
  • > Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You [New Window]
    • Hint: Look about 3-4 lines down from the top 
    • Recommendation > [New Window] to open in a New Window


Step 2: Identify Yourself

The next steps depend on if you HAVE or HAVE NOT registered previously to use our Priority Response system. Normally Step 2.2 is only done once... i.e. when first using the Priority Response system.

  • If you HAVE registered previously please follow the instructions in 2.1
  • If you HAVE NOT registered previously please follow the instructions in 2.2

2.1) If you HAVE registered previously to use our Priority Response system continue here:

  • Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Login box about 1-2 inches down near the left edge below the Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE title.
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendation your Login will be your email address that you supplied the first time when you registered to use the Priority Response system.  
    • Hint: Type your login. (usually all lower case)
    • Hint: If you do not have a login and password, follow the New User? First Time? Takes 1 Minute! Immediate Setup! link
  • Password
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Password box
    • Hint: Look about an inch to the right.
    • Hint: Type your password
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendations, your password will be all lower case text followed by some numbers
  • > Go
    • Hint: You may get a prompt from Windows at this point asking you if want Windows to remember this password. > Yes or > No.
      • Hint: Choosing Yes will avoid having to re-enter the password in the future

2.2) If you HAVE NOT registered previously to use our Priority Response system please do this:

  • Consult the related document (see below) entitled "New User - Registration for Priority Response" and follow the instructions there.
  • After Registering if you have not logged out and logged back in we recommend that you do so.
  • Then Go back to Step 1 and then go to step 2.1 and Step 3.
    • Hint: This ensures a clean exit and restart after the registration process.


 

Step 3:  Subscribe to an Article &/or sub-Article.  

  • > Articles
    • Hint: look near the top left corner of the page. Look under the K in Knowledge Base. 
  • Browse the Table of Contents (TOC): Find the article or sub-article that you are interested in subscribing to.
    • Hint: The left margin TOC is a great navigation tool 
    • Hint: Most users will be interested in the Technical Info articles &/or sub articles.
  • Drill down into the TOC to find articles &/or sub-articles that interest you. 
    • When you have found the article and/or sub-articles that you want to subscribe to:
      • Look near the top right of the Knowledge Base window just below the "Logout" and "Logged as:" text.
      • You will see a small envelope with a red tick mark. This is the Subscribe icon.
        • Roll over it and it will echo back "Subscribe"
    • > the Subscribe Icon (small envelope with red tick mark)
      • If you want the article you are currently in plus all sub-articles "below" that article, put a check mark in the box to the left of Article/SubArticle in the pop-up window.
      • If you want the article you are currently in but not its sub-articles, then leave the Article/SubArticle box unchecked.
    • Leave the Category check box unchecked. 
    • To select the Notification Type click the down arrow and scroll the slider bar to see the various notification types.
      • Choose from: (we recommend Daily email notification)
        • Instant email notification.
          • The Priority Response system will email you shortly after any changes or additions to articles/sub-articles you have subscribed to. This can become a bit of a nuisance when we are making a lot of edits over an extended period of time during a day. This is likely not the best choice overall for most users. If we are doing a lot of edits to an article or adding a lot of sub-articles and make 15 discrete edits to the article or additions of sub-articles over a period of a few hours in a day, you will get 15 separate notifications during the day.
        • Daily email notification.
          • The Priority Response system will email the results of all changes or additions to articles/sub-articles you have subscribed to at one time once per day. This is likely the best choice. If we are doing a lot of edits to an article and make 15 discrete edits to the article over a period of a few hours in a day, you will get only the final version, not every single edit along the way. Same thing for additions, you will get them all in one notification.
        • Weekly email notification.
          • Works like Daily email notification in that the Priority Response system rounds up all changes to articles/sub-articles that you have subscribed to and then sends the final version only. May result in you waiting up to 7 days for changes made.
        • > Submit
        • > Close 

 

C: Troubleshooting

1. These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.

2. Write down your login and password information exactly as you entered it and as you are entering it. Safeguard this carefully. The vast majority of inquiries we get are from people who have lost or forgotten their login and password.

We strongly recommend:

  • Use the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) method but something that is unique to you.
  • Use all lower case letters as in xxx not XXX. Do not mix case like AbCe. You will forget if you mix case.
  • For your login (sometimes referred to as username)... use your email address
  • For your password... use your formal first name followed immediately by a string of 4+ digits that mean something to you.
    • Some examples of passwords appear below:
      • david1963  as in david not dave and as in 1963 for year of birth
      • robert19581126 as in robert not bob and 19581126 as in YYYY (year) MM (month) DD (day) i.e. in this case 1958 Nov 26th.
      • rebecca94302 as in rebecca not becky and as in 94302 your zipcode
      • richard1969 as in richard not rick and as in 1969 the year man first landed on the moon

3. Reboot from COLD COLD COLD: Sometimes computers, web browsers and web browser "cookies" get muddled up. This is particularly the case with older computer systems having limited memory and/or older versions of operating systems such as Windows 98. You can spend a great deal of time mucking around trying to solve problems and never actually figure it out.

Before you drive yourself crazy, start tearing boards out of your computer or reloading software...

  • Save all your unsaved computer files.
  • Close your browser and all other software applications.
  • Shut all hardware down. Everything... computer, monitor, router, modem, power... the whole works.
  • Wait til the computer is making no noise at all and then:
    • Power up your modem and/or router
    • Power up network switch, hub etc
    • Power up your monitor
    • Power up your computer
  • Fire up your internet browser before doing anything else with your computer.
  • Try to access Priority Response.  
4. Question. I subscribed to an article but have never received an email notification of changes or additions to the article. What's going on?

Answer:
  • Well, if could be that no changes or additions to the article have taken place since you subscribed. You might want to print out the article and then check again in a few days to see if any changes have occured. If you find that the article has changed but you were not informed by email see below.
  • Assuming that changes have indeed occurred, if you were not notified by email it is possible that your email address was entered incorrectly when you registered. Make sure the email that you registered with is in fact a working email. Send yourself an email from another system and confirm that the email arrives at the destination address OK.
  • You might also want to carry out our Test Procedure. Consult the related document (see below) entitled "Notification Service - Test Procedure" and follow the instructions there.

 

 
2.1.1.3.1.2. Priority Response Notification Service - How it Works - Some Examples
Question: How does the Notification Service inform me about changes or additions to articles that I have subscribed to?
 
Answer: Here are some typical scenarios.
  • Example 1: Assuming that there is an Article "1" and two sub-Articles "1a" and "1b"
    • i.e. Article 1
      • sub-Article 1a
      • sub-Article 1b
    • Subscribers to Article 1 who did NOT check the Article/subArticle box during the selection process will receive email notifications of changes to Article 1 only
    • Subscribers to Article 1 who checked the Article/subArticle box during the selection process will receive email notifications of changes to 1 and/or 1a and/or 1b and/or if a new sub-Article 1c is added.
    • Subscribers to a particular sub-Article (i.e. 1b) only will receive email notifications of changes to that particular sub-Article (i.e. 1b) only.
    • Subscribers who have elected Instant Notification will be emailed immediately after the administrator of the Article or sub-Article acts to Save & Close after making changes or additions.
    • Subscribers who have elected Daily or Weekly Notification will be emailed at the time of the daily or weekly notification run.
  • Notes:
      • Changes to the metadata associated with an article such as its short Title or long Title are considered changes and result in Notifications. 
      • Registered users can subscribe to any number of Articles or sub-Articles and elect Instant Notification on some while electing Daily Notification on others.  
2.1.1.3.1.3. Priority Response Notification Service - Test Procedure
Question: Is there a procedure for testing the Notification Service once I have subscribed to an Article or sub-Article?
 
Answer: Yes. Here is a test procedure that should do the trick. Please see below:
  • See How to Subscribe and action accordingly.
  • Subscribe to this Article
    • Choose Instant Notification or
    • Choose Daily Notification
      • We do not recommend Weekly Notification for testing the system.
  • Email this article to sales@richmondrc.com
      • Hint: Roll over the small icons at the top right, they will echo back their purpose. Click on the email icon.
    • Leave the Subject defaulted to: Test Procedure
    • Uncheck the Include Article Content box.
    • Enter into the body of the message something like:
      • I want to test the Notification Service. Please amend this article as soon as possible.
    • > Send
  • When we receive the email message we will make a small edit to this message by adding "YYYYMMDD_HHMM Test Requested" to the bottom of the message. We will then Save & Send it.
    • YYYYMMDD is the current Year, Month, Day and HHMM is the current Hour and Minute
  • This will trigger the Notification Service to send an email to all subscribers who have subscribed to this article notifiying them of the change and providing a link back to this article.
  • If your subscription is working properly, you will receive the email as soon as we Save & Send the change if you have selected Instant Notification or later the following evening if you have elected Daily Notification.
  • You may wish to then unsubscribe from this Article so that you won't receive any further notifications to this test procedure document.
  • Once you've proven out the system with this test and know that your email is working OK, go ahead and subscribe to other "real" Articles or sub-Articles that you are interested in.
 
20070224_1727_Test Requested
20070224_1732_Test Requested
2.1.1.3.1.4. Priority Response Notification Service - How To un-Subscribe

Question: How do I un-Subscribe from the Notification Service using the Priority Response system?

Answer: 

To un-Subscribe from the Notification Service using the Priority Response system please read the following information carefully.   

A. Introduction

B. The Procedure - Step by Step

Step 1: Access the Priority Response system

Step 2: Identify Yourself

Step 3: un-Subscribe from an Article &/or sub-Article

C. Troubleshooting

Please review all information from beginning to end before proceeding. Look over the Troubleshooting section  as well. This will point out pitfalls and questions that have arisen in the past to help you stay clear of common problems and/or resolve them quickly.


 

A. Introduction

  • These instructions assume that you have a basic knowledge of how to work with a computer equipped with a graphical user interface (GUI) such as Windows and that you are familiar with an internet browser such as Internet Explorer (IE). If you do not have these prerequisites you may wish to get someone to assist you.
    • In cases where we give hints to the operation of the computer, the operating system or the browser, these hints are based on the assumption that you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) as your browser on an Intel based PC running Windows XP. Windows 2000 and versions of Windows later than XP, generally are similar in operation but details may vary slightly from version to version.  
  • It may be helpful to have these instructions in a printed form. For novice users we strongly suggest printing these instructions. To print, look for the three icons in the top right of this article, they are near the Logout and Help buttons. If you cannot see these icons or buttons use your mouse to scroll the screen view further to the right. Mouse over the icons and you will see what they do. Click on the middle icon to print out this information. Then respond to the prompts and printing instructions provided by your computer.
  • Within this document
    • The ">" symbol means "click on".
    • Information tagged as Hints may be unnessary for experienced users.
  • These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.


B: The Procedure - Step by Step

Please Do Step 1 ... then Step 2 ...  then Step 3.
  • Step 1:  Access the Priority Response system.
  • Step 2:  Identify Yourself
  • Step 3:  un-Subscribe to an Article &/or sub-Article.


 

Step 1:  Access the Priority Response System.

  • > www.richmondrc.com
    • Hint: > means "Click On"
    • Hint: Or type www.richmondrc.com into the address bar of your web browser and press the Enter key.
  • > Welcome
  • > Support Services
    • Hint: See the middle of the menu bar near the top.
  • > Priority Response - VERY FAST - We respond within 1 Business Day [New Window]
    • Hint: Look about 3-4 lines down from the top 
    • Recommendation > [New Window] to open in a New Window


Step 2: Identify Yourself

  • Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Login box about 1-2 inches down near the left edge below the Login for PRIORITY RESPONSE title.
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendation your Login will be your email address that you supplied the first time when you registered to use the Priority Response system.  
    • Hint: Type your login. (usually all lower case)
    • Hint: If you do not have a login and password, follow the New User? First Time? Takes 1 Minute! Immediate Setup! link
  • Password
    • Hint: Move your cursor to the blank Password box
    • Hint: Look about an inch to the right.
    • Hint: Type your password
    • Hint: If you followed our recommendations, your password will be all lower case text followed by some numbers
  • > Go
    • Hint: You may get a prompt from Windows at this point asking you if want Windows to remember this password. > Yes or > No.
      • Hint: Choosing Yes will avoid having to re-enter the password in the future
  • > Priority Response (Tickets)
    • Hint: See the middle area of the menu bar near the top
  • See Section 3 below


 

Step 3:  un-Subscribe from an Article &/or sub-Article.  

  • > Articles
    • Hint: look near the top left side of screen about 1-2 inches from the top
  • Browse the Table of Contents (TOC): Find the article or sub-article that you are interested in un-subscribing from.
    • Hint: The left margin TOC is a great navigation tool 
    • Hint: Sort of obvious but remember you can only un-subscribe from articles that you subscribed to earlier.
  • Drill down into the TOC to find articles &/or sub-articles that you want to un-subscribe from. 
    • When you have found the article and/or sub-articles that you want to un-subscribe from:
      • Look near the top right of the Knowledge Base window just below the "Logout" and "Logged as:" text.
      • You will see a small envelope with a red tick mark.
        • Roll over it and it will echo back "Subscribe"
    • > the Subscribe Icon
      • If you want to just un-subscribe from the current article leave the Article/SubArticle box unchecked.
      • If you want to un-subscribe from the current article and any sub-articles below it, check the Article/SubArticle box.
    • Leave the Category check box unchecked. 
    • Select the Notification Type by clicking the down arrow and scroll the slider bar to see the various notification types.
      • Choose Unsubscribe
    • > Submit
    • > Close 

 

C: Troubleshooting

1. These instructions should be followed EXACTLY. If something does not appear to work for you, back up a step or two and review the instructions again carefully. Do NOT skip steps.

2. Write down your login and password information exactly as you entered it and as you are entering it. Safeguard this carefully. The vast majority of inquiries we get are from people who have lost or forgotten their login and password.

We strongly recommend:

  • Use the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) method but something that is unique to you.
  • Use all lower case letters as in xxx not XXX. Do not mix case like AbCe. You will forget if you mix case.
  • For your login (sometimes referred to as username)... use your email address
  • For your password... use your formal first name followed immediately by a string of 4+ digits that mean something to you.
    • Some examples of passwords appear below:
      • david1963  as in david not dave and as in 1963 for year of birth
      • robert19581126 as in robert not bob and 19581126 as in YYYY (year) MM (month) DD (day) i.e. in this case 1958 Nov 26th.
      • rebecca94302 as in rebecca not becky and as in 94302 your zipcode
      • richard1969 as in richard not rick and as in 1969 the year man first landed on the moon

3. Reboot from COLD COLD COLD: Sometimes computers, web browsers and web browser "cookies" get muddled up. This is particularly the case with older computer systems having limited memory and/or older versions of operating systems such as Windows 98. You can spend a great deal of time mucking around trying to solve problems and never actually figure it out.

Before you drive yourself crazy, start tearing boards out of your computer or reloading software...

  • Save all your unsaved computer files.
  • Close your browser and all other software applications.
  • Shut all hardware down. Everything... computer, monitor, router, modem, power... the whole works.
  • Wait til the computer is making no noise at all and then:
    • Power up your modem and/or router
    • Power up network switch, hub etc
    • Power up your monitor
    • Power up your computer
  • Fire up your internet browser before doing anything else with your computer.
  • Try to access Priority Response.  
4. Question. I un-subscribed from an article but I am still getting notifications about changes to sub-articles associated with teh article that I have un-subscribed from. I want to un-subscribe from these sub-articles as well. What should I do?

Answer:
  • Well, you have probably overlooked checking the Article/SubArticle box when you un-Subscribed from the Article. So the system will have un-subscribed you from the Article but left you subscribed to the sub-Articles. To fix this, carefully repeat Step 3 above.  
2.2. Site Information - News

20070224 - Our Priority Response suite has been upgraded. Priority Response registered members now have access to Priority Response Tickets and to the Priority Response Notification Service.

  • Priority Response Tickets - for reporting, tracking and resolving customer issues. Full customer interaction.
  • Priority Response Notification Service - At customers option, any article and/or sub-articles can be subscribed to by Priority Response members for automated email Notification of changes. Get in the loop, stay in the loop!

For More Information  < click here to see in this window or click > [New Window]


20070224 - Enabled Article Voting

20070224 - Site How To & News updated to include Site How To information about Priority Response Notification Services. Documentation, Examples and a Test Procedure added.

20060206 -  Site How To & News updated to include Site How To information about Tickets - How to Open (create) and Tickets - How to Edit, View, Attach Files and/or add Notes to. See Site How To links in Table of Contents.

20060203 - Technical Information sections for VMAX Electric Power Systems, Motors & ESC added to Knowledge Base.

20050903 - The VMA-S210X Aero Subaru 06-15 ARF has been added to the Knowledge Base. Browse Table of Contents to Technical Information - VMAR - Products then browse for VMA-S210X Aero Subaru 06-15 ARF or use the Search Tool to find VMA-S210X or Aero Subaru 06-15 ARF.   

20050827 - The VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF has been added to the Knowledge Base. Browse Table of Contents to Technical Information - VMAR - Products then browse for VMA-B210X Bird Dog or use the Search Tool to find VMA-B210X or Bird Dog.  

3. We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
3.1. Support - Knowledge Base - OnLine Self Help with Indexed Relevancy based Search
Our Knowledge Base is your BEST OPTION for getting IMMEDIATE INFORMATION about our products and services.

For access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to the most up to date, expanding and accessible source of information we've got, please:
3.2. Support - Submit A Question
After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.
 
To Submit A Question please:
  • Visit www.richmondrc.com,
    •  > Support
    • Review Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You,
    • Submit a Question. in the Knowledge Base menu bar       
      • Enter your name, email and phone 
      • Enter your question
      • > Send
    • We will get back to you within 2 Business Days.


3.3. Support - Printable (PDF) Price Lists & More - Downloads
To download printable (PDF) Price Lists & More please:
  • Visit www.richmondrc.com,
    • > Consumers OR
      • > Wholesale
    • Choose Location
      • > Canada OR
      • > USA OR
      • > International
    • At the top of the of the Table of Contents in left margin
    • > * Price Lists & More
      • > Price List [PDF]
3.4. Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
3.5. Support - Join our Mailing List - Sign Up Now
Signing up for our Mailing List is the best way to receive periodic product eMail announcements, news releases, promotions, contest details, sales offers etc related to our products and services. We do NOT release your information to third parties and we have OnLine tools for you to edit your information or opt out at any time.
 
To Join our Mailing List please:
  • Visit www.richmondrc.com
3.6. Support - Replacement Parts & After Market Accessories

To find parts and selected after market upgrades & accessories for our products please:

  • Visit www.richmondrc.com,
    • > Select Consumers or > Wholesale
  • Browse the various Product Lines
    • > Product Line of Interest
  • Browse the categories
    • > Category of Interest

If you are unable to locate a particular part and need further assistance please Submit A Question.

 

3.7. Support - Shipping Information

For information related to shipping times, tracking numbers etc:

 

4. Technical Information - Adhesives

 

4.1. CA - What is it?

Question: I see the term "CA" mentioned here, what do you mean by CA?

Answer: CA is short for CyanoAcrylate or short for Cyanoacrylate Adhesive depending on who you talk to. Both are correct. CA is the family of adhesives that is often described as "Super Glue".

CA's cure quickly, glue a wide range of materials and provide a very strong bond even in small amounts.

 

4.2. CA's - Should they be stored in a Fridge?

 

Question: Should CA's be stored in a refrigerator?

Short Answer:  Good quality CA's like the Pacer ZAP line do not require refrigeration unless you plan on storing the product for more than a year. Keep the bottle sealed and out of direct sunlight or hot rooms. If you do refrigerate any CA, allow it to stabilize and come to room temperature overnight before using.

Better Answer: There has long been a controversy over the need to refrigerate CA's in order to sustain their shelf life. It is helpful to understand the history of this practise, the original reasons for it and what we recommend today.

1) Background.

Refrigeration slows down the decay of CA's and subsequent hardening caused by contaminants in the glue, evaporation of additives, UV light, water vapour and poor packaging. Prior to 1982, most CA's offered into the hobby market, were in fact industrial products that had failed against some factory criteria. Hobby "packagers" would buy this discarded material and package it for consumer sale. In many cases, the shelf life of the material was 60-90 days and if you wanted to extend the life, refrigeration was required. This practise continues today for adhesives sold at the lower end of the price scale.

2) In 1982...

Pacer Technology introduced the ZAP line of adhesives that were blended and formulated specifically for consistency, quality and long shelf life. Pacer also introduced nitrogen bottle purging and filling, welded bottle nozzles and CA's that were more pure than anything on the market up to that time. Unopened shelf life was guaranteed to the purchaser for 1 year.

3) Today...

Only the low cost cheap grade CA's require refrigeration in order to extend their shelf life longer than 90 days. Good quality CA's such as ZAP (Pacer) products are made from the purest materials, packaged to ensure long shelf life and do not require refrigeration.

4) If refrigeration is undertaken...

There are several issues to concern yourself with. Let the adhesive come to room temperature overnight before using. Cold glue is slower to cure, offers weaker bonds and condenses water from the air as room temperature air is sucked back into the bottle to replace cold glue dispensed. The warmer air condenses over the cold glue remaining in the bottle. This addition of condensed water further contaminates the glue and dramatically shortens the life of the remaining CA in the bottle.

4.3. CA's - Thin, Thick or Very Thick? Which to use for what?

 

Question: What is the difference between the various thicknesses of CA's? Some are thin like water, others are thick like syrup or molasses. Which is to be used for what? 

Short Answer:

- Thin CA offers the fastest cure, can be applied after parts are assembled, parts MUST fit well, and thin CA is reasonably tolerant of different wood types

- Thick CA offers fast cure, must be applied to the parts prior to assembly, some roughness of fit is OK and thick CA is very tolerant of different wood types.

- Very Thick CA offers a slower cure, must be applied to parts prior to assembly, can be applied to parts that fit poorly, can be used like a white or aliphatic glue and very thick CA is tolerant of different wood types.

Better Answer:

1) Thin... almost like water (typical viscosity 5 centipois).

- works well on pure woods and plastics (except Teflon, Delrin or Nylon) that fit very well. There should not be a gap between the parts. The wood should not be pitchy or laminated like plywood. - does not work well on pitchy wood, dirty parts, rough fitting parts or parts that are extremely porous. - cure time is almost instant, in the order of seconds - parts should be assembled first and the adhesive wicked into the joint externally. The adhesive will penetrate many millimetres and up to a centimetre into the joint area. - great for assembling open frameworks like model airplane wings that can be fitted together, pinned into position and then glued together when ready. Just apply a drop to each joint area, wait a few moments and you can remove pins etc and you are done! - do NOT use thin CA with CA accelerators. - typical brand names, ZAP with a Pink Label, VCA with a Red Label.

2) Thick sometimes called Medium... like warm syrup (typical viscosity 100 centipois).

- works well on all woods and plastics (except Teflon, Delrin or Nylon) that fit reasonably well. Parts should fit well but will tolerate some roughness of fit. - Tolerant of pitches, veneers and plywoods. Works well on hardwoods. Tolerates some porosity of substrates. - cure time is related to tightness of fit. Generally cures in 10 seconds when parts fit well. Up to a minute for rough joints. May take even longer to cure in open puddles. In all cases, application of accelerators like Zip Kicker and VCA Velocity speed up cure. - parts should be trial fitted first to ensure a good fit. Parts should then be separated and thick CA applied to one surface like white glue. the parts then can be fitted and secured in place to allow the adhesive to cure.  The adhesive will penetrate slightly into the substrates but not enough to allow for wicking after the parts have been assembled. External application will produce a fillet along the joint that does add strength to the joint but should not be the main adhesive joint. - great for assembling model airplane fuselages, hardwood bearers, plywood components, boats, veneers and most plastics. Probably the best all round choice if you must choose only one adhesive. - recommended for use with CA accelerators. - typical brand names, ZAP-A-GAP with a Green Label, VCA with a Green Label.

3) Very Thick... like white glue or aliphatic glue (typical viscosity 700 centipois).

- works well on all woods and plastics (except Teflon, Delrin or Nylon). Parts should fit but will tolerate considerable roughness of fit and gaps of up to a millimetre. - Tolerant of pitches, veneers and plywoods. Works well on hardwoods. Tolerates considerable porosity of substrates. - cure time is related to tightness of fit. Generally cures in 20 seconds when parts fit well. Up to a couple of minutes for rough joints. Will take longer to cure in open puddles. In all cases, application of accelerators like Zip Kicker and VCA Velocity speed up cure. - parts should be trial fitted first to ensure a good fit. Parts should then be separated and very thick CA applied to one surface like white glue. The parts then can be fitted and secured in place to allow the adhesive to cure. The adhesive will penetrate only slightly into the substrates and not enough to allow for wicking after the parts have been assembled. External application will produce a fillet along the joint that does add strength to the joint but should not be the main adhesive joint. - great for assembling model airplane fuselages, hardwood bearers, plywood components, boats, veneers etc. Great if you want the speed of a CA while using assembly methods applicable to white glue. - strongly recommended for use with accelerators. - typical brand names, SLOW ZAP with a Yellow Label, VCA with a Blue Label. 

4.4. Data Sheets - MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) & PDS (Product Data Sheet)

Question: I require data sheets (MSDS and/or PDS) for your adhesive products. How do I get them?

Answer: Please go to: https://supergluemsds.com and then...

Click the down arrow to the right of "Please Choose Product Brand",

or

Click the down arrow to the right of "Please Choose Product Name",

and then

Click Search MSDS for Material Safety Data Sheets,

or 

Click Search PDS for Product Data Sheets.  
 

 

4.5. Epoxy - Slow Cure vs Fast Cure - Which is Best?

Question: Epoxy is available in different cure speeds. Should I use a Slow Cure (30 Minute) or a Fast Cure (5 Minute) Epoxy?

Short Answer: Use 30 Minute Epoxy where strength and structural integrity is important such as when joining wings or mounting stabilizers, engine firewalls etc. Use Fast Cure for quick repairs of small non-critical components or joints. If in doubt, always use 30 Minute Epoxy.

Better Answer: There are two general factors to consider,  Bond Strength and Working Time. 30 Minute Epoxy creates a stronger bond and it gives you more time to work. 5 Minute Epoxy gives a good bond but it is not as strong as 30 Minute Epoxy and it must be used very quickly, particulary in warm conditions.

The Bond Strength is pretty straighforward... 30 Minute simply gives stronger bonds. Use 30 Minute when joining wings, installing stabilizers, engine firewalls or other load bearing critical structural components that you simply cannot afford to have come off or fail. Use 5 Minute Epoxy for quick minor repairs of non-load bearing or light load bearing less critical components.

The Working Time is something that modelers frequently overlook and tend to err a bit in favor of  "fast is good". In some cases, like a quick repair of a simple small component... fast is really nice! But in cases where the amount of adhesive is considerable, the components are large or complex and/or need to be simultaneously mated with other parts.... you need to allow for plenty of time to work in order to get the parts aligned and properly placed. It is very important that the Epoxy is fully "wet" when being used. If Epoxy starts to thicken at all before the parts are joined, the Epoxy will not produce a good bond.

The worst possible scenario is using 5 Minute Epoxy on a complex multi-piece job like joining a wing. We have had too many calls from people who end up with the Epoxy beginning to cure before the wing halves are properly joined. We have also seen wing joints after in flight failures caused by gummy thick half cured Epoxy not penetrating and filling the joint and component substrates properly.

If you have any doubts about the complexity of a job, need for strength, working time etc, always use 30 Minute Epoxy!

5. Technical Information - Master Airscrew Products
5.1. Master AirScrew Products - Propellers - General
The following information is provided from Master Airscrew (Windsor Propellor Company Inc.)
5.2. Master Airscrew Products - GearBox Instructions
The following information is provided from Master Airscrew (Windsor Propellor Company Inc.)
5.3. Master Airscrew Products - Motors (Electric) - Specifications
The following information is provided from Master Airscrew (Windsor Propellor Company Inc.)
5.4. Master Airscrew Products - Drill Guide Balance System - Instructions
The following information is provided from Master Airscrew (Windsor Propellor Company Inc.)
  • Drill Guide (Prop) Balance System Instructions
6. Technical Information - POLYPRO Products
6.1. POLYPRO Products - General
6.1.1. POLYPRO LiPo Packs - Documents - Common to Many Battery Packs
These documents are common to many or all POLYPRO battery packs and are in addition to documentation specific to a particular battery pack.
6.2. POLYPRO - Product by Product
6.2.1. PPR-SC2020 Apache Smart Charger 2020 (12VDC INPUT)
6.2.1.1. PPR-SC2020 Apache Smart Charger 2020 - Documents

Please see the attached PDF documents related to this product. File names indicate the nature of the document.

7. Technical Information - RC Flying - General

 

7.1. Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

7.2. Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

7.3. Engine Prop Shaft Sizes - Cross Reference for Du-Bro Spinner Prop Nuts
Question: Is there a cross reference between Engine Prop Shaft sizes and Du-Bro Spinner Prop Nuts?

Answer: Yes, please see the attached cross reference courtesy of Dubro Products Inc.

Note: For VMAX Engine Prop Shaft sizes please see your VMAX Owners Manual. The VMAX Owners Manual can also be downloaded from within the related article entitled "VMAX Engines - Documents..." as listed below.
7.4. Engine Parts Cross Reference - Magnum-ThunderTiger

Question: Is there a cross reference between Engines such as Magnum and Thunder Tiger?

Answer: Yes, please see the attached cross reference information.

Note: Many different parts are made by a relatively small number of manufacturers and may appear in various brands of engines. The attached cross references are reasonably accurate but there is no guarantee that the parts fit your particular engine. Only a careful purchase followed by a trial installation will tell you for sure that a part fits.

Note 2: ASP, Magnum and GMS engines MAY MAY MAY use some of these parts as well. See caution note above.  

7.5. Flap Deflection - How Much is about right?

Question: How much deflection should I use for my Flaps? Can I overdo it?

Answer: We recommend using no more than 50% of the maximim deflection that the flap is capable of. Any more than that will likely due more harm than good.

Better Answer: If you overdo the flap deflection beyond 50% of the maximum deflection that the flap is capable of, you will get little additional flap effect but will substantially increase the drag and possibly make the model unstable. There is also a reduction in the effectiveness of the vertical stabilizer and the rudder when as flap deflection is increased. This loss of effectiveness can reduce the ability to counteract and control Yaw making it particuarly important to ensure that both flaps are deployed to the same degree at all times. Differential (non-equal) flap deflection can result in a crash due to roll and pitch changes that can be very difficult to overcome and control.

We suggest phasing in the amount of flap deflection, starting with very little and working up to the 50% max noted above. At each step, test your control over Yaw (using the rudder) and Roll (using the ailerons). If you can't maintain control over Yaw and/or Roll or the model is Pitching suddenly up or down, back off on the amount of flap deflection.

7.6. Flaperon Ready - What does it Mean? What are Flaperons anyway?

Question: What are Flaperons and what is meant by the term Flaperon Ready?

Answer: The term Flaperons is used to describe Ailerons that can act as Ailerons AND act as Flaps. When we design Ailerons so that they can or must use two servos the model is Flaperon Ready.

The Flaperons in a Flaperon Ready model are not mandatory but we have designed the model so that the Ailerons can be activated as Flaperons if you use two servos for the ailerons and a computer radio.

Better Answer: Flaps are generally used for take offs and landings only. They hang down from the back edge of the wing and increase the lift of the wing enabling the model to take off and land at slower speeds. Landing at slower speeds can make landing a little easier on the nerves. Flaps go down only.

Ailerons are used all the time in flight. Ailerons go up and down.

By using two servos and a computer radio it is possible to use an Aileron like a Flap while still using it as an Aileron. This is called a Flaperon.

When we manufacture a model we always include Ailerons. When we design Ailerons so that they can or must use two servos the model is Flaperon Ready.

To take advantage of Flaperons in a Flaperon Ready model, you must use two servos for the Ailerons and must have a computer radio.

For information regarding Flaperon Deflection please see the following article,

Flaperon Deflection - How Much is about right?

Question: How much deflection should I use for my Flaperons? Can I overdo it?

Answer: Use 50-65% of the maximim aileron deflection. Any more than that will substantially reduce the effectiveness of your ailerons.

Better Answer: If you overdo the flaperon deflection (i.e. when using the ailerons as Flaps) beyond 50-65% of the maximum aileron deflection you will get little additional flap effect but will substantially reduce the effectiveness of the ailerons (i.e. ability to roll left or roll right).

When over deployed as a flap, the aileron cannot move further down as an aileron. The other aileron can move up so you end up with half the roll effect much like that you would experience with having only one aileron. In addition to the weaker  more sluggish roll effect of a single aileron you will have yaw induced by the differential in deflection between one aileron and the other.

 

7.7. Flaperon Deflection - How Much is about right?

Question: How much deflection should I use for my Flaperons? Can I overdo it?

Answer: Use 50-65% of the maximim aileron deflection. Any more than that will substantially reduce the effectiveness of your ailerons.

Better Answer: If you overdo the flaperon deflection (i.e. when using the ailerons as Flaps) beyond 50-65% of the maximum aileron deflection you will get little additional flap effect but will substantially reduce the effectiveness of the ailerons (i.e. ability to roll left or roll right).

When over deployed as a flap, the aileron cannot move further down as an aileron. The other aileron can move up so you end up with half the roll effect much like that you would experience with having only one aileron. In addition to the weaker  more sluggish roll effect of a single aileron you will have yaw induced by the differential in deflection between one aileron and the other.

 

7.8. Radio Systems - Common Issues & What To Do

 

7.8.1. Servos - Common Issues & What To Do

 

7.8.1.1. Servo - Chatter
Question: I have a servo that "chatters" and twitches, any idea what is causing this?
 
Answer: This can be caused by a variety of different things.
 
1) The servo may be dirty or have had water get into it. In most cases this is fixable by a technician but it is hopelessly uneconomic to pay someone to repair standard servos given their prices today.
 
2) The servo may have been or is being subject to lots of vibration. This is usually related to an out of balance prop, spinner, engine or motor or mounting the servo without the vibration isolating rubber grommets or cinching down the servo mounting screws too tight or failing to install the brass ferrules to prevent grommet compression.  
 
3) Electrical interference being picked up by the wiring between the servo and receiver . If the leads are long (particularly if you are using extensions) they serve as a form of antenna and can pick up signals from sources including sources both internal and external to the model. Internal sources are typically metal on metal control rod connections or other metal to metal couplers. Electric motors (particularly brushed motors) and speed controls (mechanical or electrical) are also common sources of electrical "noise".
 
4) Electrical interference being picked up by the receiver antenna and relayed through the receiver to the servos. Antenna's that are cut or not properly routed around electrical sources (keep your antenna away from a brushed electric motor) are common sources of such interference. Old noisy automobile ignitions in the area of your receiver are another source of such interference.
 
5) Bad information coming from your transmitter and being faithfully passed from your receiver to the servo.
 
6) With the points above, we have probably hit on the 90% of common causes. The final 10% is hard to nail down with a few points. Think dirt, think water, think sources of electrical noise, think vibration.
 
Troubleshooting:
 
Keeping these causes in mind we suggest the following troubleshooting approach:
 
a) Figure out when the servo chatters. Has something changed recently? Has the servo been crashed or dunked? Has it chattered from new or just started recently? Does the servo chatter all the time when it is powered up? Only when the receiver is turned on but the transmitter is turned off? Only when the receiver and transmitter are both turned on? Only when operating your engine or motor? Only when the model is moving? Only when the model is free to move or even when the model is held firmly.
 
b) Is the noisy servo the only servo in your model that chatters? Does the noisy servo chatter regardless of which channel or extension lead you connect it to? If you replace the noisy servo with another servo of the same type and connect this replacement servo to the same lead and channel, does the replacement servo chatter also?
 
c) Remove the servo from the model. Connect it directly to a known good receiver. Does it still chatter?
 
The idea here is to use common sense and some simple trial and error tests to narrow down the cause of the problem. If the noisy servo appears to chatter regardless of where you install it and under all operating conditions then you are probably best off to chuck the servo and go with a replacement. If however, the servo only chatters under some conditions and other similar servos also chatter when exposed to the same conditions, try to locate the source of the interference and eliminate it.
 
 
 
7.8.1.2. Servo - Noises at Idle - Humming, Buzzing, Groaning etc
Question: What causes servos to make a noise when at "idle"?
 
Answer: This is nearly always caused by a stiff or sticking mechanical connection beyond the servo arm. The servo is trying to return to center when at idle and the mechanical linkage is impeding this so the servo keeps trying.
 
This puts a load on your servo, may cause wear and puts a high electrical load on your servo which will drain your flight pack more quickly than normal.
 
In the case of electrical RC systems that use a Battery Elimination Circuit (BEC) special consideration must be given to eliminating unnecessary loads from the servos. Firstly, such loads are depleting your only battery and this will lead to shorter run times and a early low voltage cutoff of power by the BEC monitoring circuit. Secondly, most BEC's are limited in the total amount of current that they can control. Adding more servos adds to the load. So does adding a bunch of servos that are all pushing on sticky mechanical linkages and working harder than they should. Some BEC's will shut down to protect themselves from overload. Other BEC's simply fail. In either event, your receiver will be without power and you will not be able to control the model if the BEC is not working.
 
Bottom line here is that you should make sure that all mechanical linkages move easily. To test for this we suggest that you remove the linkages from the servo arm. If the humming, buzzing or groaning noise goes away, then the mechanical linkage is binding. Straighten the path, make sure clevises, rods and other connectors are free to rotate in the servo arm holes etc. All control linkages should be slop free but move easily with a light touch of your fingers. Once you have the linkage freed up, reconnect the linkage to the servo and move the servo to and fro across the neutral position. Let the servo return to neutral. The noise should have stopped. If the noise is still present and you are sure that the mechanical linkages are not binding, you have another problem with the servo.
 
 
7.9. Snap Rolls - Managing the Risk - What Can I Do?

Question: I've heard some horror stories about snap rolls and seen some spectacular sudden crashes that the pilot stated were caused by a snap roll. What can I do to prevent this happening to me? Is the risk manageable?

Answer: Yes the risk is manageable. Keep your airspeed up and limit the amount of elevator throw at lower air speeds. Be aware that low wing aerobatic models with smaller horizontal stabilizers generally will snap roll more easily than others.

Better Answer: First of all it is important to say what we mean by the term "snap roll". It is frequently misused and it is not always a bad thing. A snap roll is like a roll induced by using the ailerons but it occurs with little or no warning, is usually extreme or violent and usually does not involve using the ailerons. Snap rolls are often messier... they are not a clean aileron induced roll and often look like the rudder is being put into play as well. This scares the dickens out of pilots who have become used to seeing an airplane roll only when it is asked to do so by deflecting the ailerons.

In fact most aerobatic aircraft use snap rolls as part of their repertoire of maneuvers. So one way to reduce but not eliminate the probability of snap rolls is to stay away from aerobatic models! Unfortunately this approach takes a heck of a lot of fun out of one whole category of RC Flying!

Rather than give up on aerobatic models, manage the risk with the following tips:

1) Watch your Altitude: Snap rolls are not dangerous themselves unless they are so violent that they tear the airframe apart. This can happen in lightweight 3D type models but other than that most model airframes are built to withstand a snap roll. It's not the snap roll that wrecks most models... it's impacting the ground that causes the problem! Granite Congestus is hard stuff! Altitude is everything. If you are going to experiment, do so with lots of air between the model and the ground.

2) Watch your Air Speed: Many unexpected snap rolls are caused by insufficient air speed. Keep your flying speed up. If in doubt, a bit too much air speed is better than too little.

3) Watch your Angle of Attack: All wings have an angle of attack beyond which they will not fly. If you force a wing beyond it's critical angle of attack, it stops flying and your model becomes a brick.

4) Watch your Elevator Throw: This is probably the most critical single thing you can do. Too much elevator throw rapidly and often uncontrollably increases the angle of attack and reduces your air speed. High angles of attack and reduced air speeds are precursors for the almost immediate onset of a snap roll.

5) Watch your Landings and Take Offs: Things gang up on you when you are near the ground. Your altitude is low, your air speed is low, your angle of attack is higher (particularly when landing... slowing down, preliminary flair setting up) and you are nervous on the sticks with a tendency to overcompensate on elevator every time the model takes a bit of a lurch downward.

6) If your radio supports dual rates, set up dual rates for the elevator and limit the throws at the low rate to not more than 65% of full aileron deflection and use the low rates during take offs and particularly during landing. You might want to experiment with exponential as well to reduce sensitivity of the servos to movements of the sticks near center.

Remember that Snap Rolls can be fun if you've got altitude and time on your side. Stay out of low altitude situations when one or more of the other contributing factors start to come into play and you will be managing the risk of a snap roll induced crash!.

 

7.10. Speed Brake Deflection - How Much is about right?

Question: How much deflection should I use for my Speed Brakes? Can I overdo it?

Answer: We recommend using no more than 50% of the maximim upward deflection that the flap is capable of. Any more than that may make your model unstable and very difficult to control safely. 

Better Answer:
If you overdo the speed brake deflection beyond 50% of the maximum upward deflection that the flap is capable of, you will get additional braking effect but will substantially increase the drag and possibly make the model unstable. There is also a reduction in the effectiveness of the vertical stabilizer and the rudder when as speed brake deflection is increased. This loss of effectiveness can reduce the ability to counteract and control Yaw making it particuarly important to ensure that both speed brakes are deployed to the same degree at all times. Differential (non-equal) speed brake deflection can result in a crash due to roll and pitch changes that can be very difficult to overcome and control.
We suggest phasing in the amount of speed brake deflection, starting with very little and working up to the 50% max noted above. At each step, test your control over Yaw (using the rudder) and Roll (using the ailerons). If you can't maintain control over Yaw and/or Roll or the model is Pitching suddenly up or down, back off on the amount of speed brake deflection.
 
A more sophisticated setup can allow for speed brake deflection beyond 50% but only when the model is on the ground. This helps to reduce runout length upon landing. This can be done in a model with a high end computer radio that allows for speed brakes to depoly in stages. The flyer then ensures that the max speed brake deflection is limited to 50% until such time as the model is on the ground.
7.11. What is a good second or third model to fly after I have soloed on a Trainer?

Question: What is a good second or third model after I have soloed on a Trainer?

Answer: Probably the best choice would be to move from the high wing flat bottom airfoil type of trainer you learned on to a high wing model with a semi-symmetrical wing.

Better Answer: It really depends on many things and there are lots opinions to listen to on this. We recommend that your second model be a high wing model with a semi-symmetrical wing and trike landing gear. You could go to a high wing semi-symmetrical tail dragger if you are flying from long grass or a rough field.

If you want to make a bit of a leap, move directly from your high wing trainer with a flat bottom wing to a semi-symmetrical low wing model with trike gear. We do not recommend going to a low wing tail dragger when you move to your first low wing model. Too much change all at once. A low wing model requires a different set of flying skills and a tail dragger can be a bit challenging when it comes to ground handling. Best to tackle your challenges one at a time.

Ideally we recommend the following sequence of VMAR models...

  1. First Model - High Wing, Flat Bottom Wing, Trike Gear, at least 60 inch wing span.
    • Apache or Discovery or Challenger
  2. Second Model - High Wing, Semi-Symmetrical Wing, Trike Gear, at least 60 inch wing span.
    • Stinger or Hornet
  3. Third Model - Low Wing, Semi-Symmetrical Wing, Trike Gear, at least 60 inch wing span.
    • Escape or RamRod
    • Subaru (semiscale model of a real aircraft... has all the characteristics of a good low wing trainer along with semiscale appearance of a good looking aircraft)
7.12. Wing - Airfoil Designation - NACA Number

Question: Does the factory provide NACA designations for the wings used in VMAR models?

Answer: VMAR models are known world wide for their great flying characteristics. One of the keys to this is the unique wing design. As such, the factory considers this information proprietary.

General airfoil types are described in our specifications and the following article includes tips on how to determine the airfoil type.

Wing - Airfoil Type - How Can I Tell?

Question: How can I tell what airfoil type is used on my model?

Answer: This is usually listed in the specifications for the model but if you can't locate the specs, not to worry. There is an easy way to determine the general type:

  1. Check the wing root (or wing tip if the root is not accessible).
  2. Draw a line from the leading edge to the trailing edge (or align one edge of low tack masking tape if you don't want to leave any marks later on).
  3. At the Thickest part of the wing, measure the distance above the line to the top skin of the wing and measure the distance below the line to the bottom skin of the wing.
    1. If the line is coincident with the bottom of the wing, the wing is a Flat Bottom Wing (also often referred to as a "Clark Y" wing)
    2. If the distance above the line is greater than the distance below the line, the airfoil is Semi-Symmetrical
    3. If the distance above the line is the same as the distance below the line, the airfoil is Symmetrical
7.13. Wing - Airfoil Type - How Can I Tell?

Question: How can I tell what airfoil type is used on my model?

Answer: This is usually listed in the specifications for the model but if you can't locate the specs, not to worry. There is an easy way to determine the general type:

  1. Check the wing root (or wing tip if the root is not accessible).
  2. Draw a line from the leading edge to the trailing edge (or align one edge of low tack masking tape if you don't want to leave any marks later on).
  3. At the Thickest part of the wing, measure the distance above the line to the top skin of the wing and measure the distance below the line to the bottom skin of the wing.
    1. If the line is coincident with the bottom of the wing, the wing is a Flat Bottom Wing (also often referred to as a "Clark Y" wing)
    2. If the distance above the line is greater than the distance below the line, the airfoil is Semi-Symmetrical
    3. If the distance above the line is the same as the distance below the line, the airfoil is Symmetrical
8. Technical Information - RC Flying Electric - General
8.1. Electric Power - Flight Performance Estimator

Question: I'm interested in getting into Electric RC Flying. I've checked out a couple of the local hobby shops, thumbed through a bunch of the RC magazines and browsed the web. I'm learning but I find some of the techno talk rather confusing and I'm more than a bit skeptical about some of the advertised claims. I've been around the block over the years and understand that nobody is going to advertise that their model flies "like a sick pig". Fair enough but sheesh... it would sure be nice to get real information instead of a load of bunkercarb! A friend of mine bought one of the low cost "foamies". The box art claimed the moon but the darned thing would hardly stay in the air... never mind actually fly!

I'd like to find a way of sifting BS from fact that does not involve smashing up models in order to find that they fly like a truck. Is there a way to estimate flight performance from some of the specs?  

Answer: Yes. There is an estimating equation that works from basic specifications to calculate the Flight Performance Index for an electric RC model. It's pretty rough and ready but it really helps sort out what is probably real from what is patent nonsense. Here is a simple way to calculate the approximate flight performance of an RC model equipped with a fully charged Lithium Polymer (LiPo) battery in good condition, an Electronic Speed Control (ESC) and a direct drive (no gearbox) Brushless Motor. (We can't attest to this working for other technologies or setups because we have not tried it)

Here is a simple estimating equation:

Performance Index  = Power supplied to the motor [watts] / Flying Weight of the model [ounces]

where:

    • Performance Index is a number ranging from 1 to 6 as calculated above and described below.   
    • Power supplied to the motor [watts]. Use an AstroFlight Whatt Meter or Medusa Flight Power Analyzer.
    • Flying Weight of the model [ounces] complete with motor, ESC, battery etc... everything that goes into the air.

To determine the Power supplied to the motor [watts] you will need to measure the power in [watts] flowing from the LiPo battery to the brushless motor after about 1 minute of full throttle operation. By this time the peak voltage and current associated with a fully charged LiPo have been burned off the battery and you will be able to measure a more stable and typical value for Power [watts]. If you have a volt meter across the battery leads and a good quality medium current DC amp meter in one line between the LiPo and the ESC you can calculate the Power [watts] = Voltage [V] * Current [Amps]. Be careful to avoid the propeller at all times. The easiest way to measure Power [watts] is to use an AstroFlight Whatt Meter or a Medusa Power Analyzer. These are both great tools for the electric flight enthusiast!

Example:

  • Power supplied to the brushless motor  = 100 Watts
  • Flying Weight of the model (complete) = 25 ounces
  • Flight Performance Index = Power[watts] / Weight[ounces] = 100/25 = 4

Interpretation:

The Flight Performance Index is a number between 1 and 6 for most models. In fact the index seldom is valued below 1 or above 6 but both are theoretically possible.

Here's the decode to interpret the Power Index:

  • 1 = Here doggy doggy! Woof woof! This simply won't fly. You'll be able to throw a brick further than you can fly this puppy!
  • 2 = Not an Eagle and not for beginners but in the hands of skilled RC pilot at sea level it will probably fly.  Hand launches pretty well a must. Ground takeoffs very tricky if not impossible. Best to not attempt to fly in the thin air of a high and/or hot location.
  • 3 = Fun to Fly. Ground takeoffs the norm. OK for beginners and up. No ball of fire but it flies well. Seldom induces panic attacks. Reduced flight performance at high altitude locations but it should still fly OK even on a hot day.
  • 4 = Sport Model. Ground takeoffs are a piece of cake. Flies well and does all the basic maneuvers. Seriously good fun and will put a smile on most faces! Relatively tolerant of thinner air found at high altitude locations and hot summer days.
  • 5 = Warbirds and hot Sport flying. Goes like stink. Too hot for beginners. Will provide a nice blend of thrills and chills. You'll be gasping for breath  long before the thin air at high and/or hot locations bogs this fast flyer down.
  • 6 = 3D capable with the right model in the right hands. Bores holes in the sky. Best to inform the Air Force. Lay on the Depends.

Caveats & Comments:

We cannot emphasize enough, the importance of considering the LiPo battery pack, ESC, brushless motor, propeller, wiring and connectors etc as a system. The components that make up your power system must all work together in such a way that current, voltage and RPM does not exceed the operating limit or efficiency threshold on any particular component. If you overload anything, it will heat up, performance will suffer and the life expectancy of the component(s) will drop dramatically. 

We are using Power [watts] measured on the ground to derive the Flight Performance Index. This is a bit counter intuitive. In almost all configurations and in almost all models, the Power [watts] in the air will be less than that measured on the ground during a static test. The Performance Index therefore is being estimated somewhat optimistically here although we have factored some of that into the interpretation of the index number itself.

Ideally, Power [watts] should be measured at the temperature and altitude expected during flight. Temperature and altitude affect air density. Air density decreases (thins) as temperature and altitude increase. Thinner air will affect performance of the propeller and this in turn affects the Power of the motor. Hence try to measure the Power at the temperature and altitude you expect to fly at. Don't worry about small variations in altitude like a few hundred feet, but flying at 5000 feet will produce a different value of the Flight Performance Index than flying at sea level and this should be accounted for when estimating actual performance.

You will notice that battery voltage is not used in the equation. Battery voltage is very important to the correct operation of the motor and ESC and has an effect on RPM and the selection of an efficient propeller but once a voltage has been selected that is compatible with the model and the various power system components, the voltage manifests itself as a contributor to Power [watts].

If your battery is not fully charged or is in bad shape you will get actual performance results that are lower than indicated by the Flight Performance Index.

If the discharge rate approaches or exceeds the battery discharge maximum recommendation you will get significant reductions in actual performance and are heading towards imminent battery failure.

Acknowledgments:

We believe in giving credit where credit is due and would like to thank Don Dombrowski of House of Balsa Inc (www.houseofbalsa.com) for providing much of the information in this article.

8.2. Electric Power - Flight Time Estimator

Question: Is there a quick and dirty way to estimate the approximate flight time in the air for my electric powered RC aircraft? I'm pretty good with a calculator but I don't work for NASA... can you give me some simple tips?

Answer: Sure. Here is a simple way to calculate the approximate flight time in the air for an RC model equipped with a fully charged Lithium Polymer (LiPo) battery in good condition, an Electronic Speed Control (ESC) and a direct drive (no gearbox) Brushless Motor. (We can't attest to this working for other technologies or setups because we have not tried it)

Here is a simple estimating equation:

Flight Time [min] = (.06 * LiPo Capacity [mAh]) / Current Draw [amps]

where:

    • Flight Time is in [minutes]. Remember this is an estimate. See caveats below.
    • LiPo Capacity is in milliAmphours [mAh].  
    • Current Draw is in amperes [Amps]

To determine LiPo Capacity, look at the label on your LiPo battery. Capacity is measured in [mAh] and is usually a number from say 500 to 4000 or more.  

To determine Current Draw you will need to measure the current flowing from the LiPo battery after about 1 minute of full throttle operation. By this time the peak voltage and current associated with a fully charged LiPo have been burned off the battery and you will be able to measure a more stable and typical Current Draw. Use a medium current DC amp meter between the LiPo and the ESC. Be careful to avoid the propeller at all times. The easiest way to do this is to use an AstroFlight Whatt Meter or a Medusa Power Analyzer. These are both great tools for the electric flight enthusiast!

Example:

  • Battery with LiPo Capacity = 1800 mAh
  • Current Draw after 1 minute of full throttle = 11 Amps
  • Flight Time in minutes = .06*1800/11 = 9.8 minutes

Caveats & Comments:

We cannot emphasize enough, the importance of considering the LiPo battery pack, ESC, brushless motor, propeller, wiring and connectors etc as a system. The components that make up your power system must all work together in such a way that current, voltage and RPM does not exceed the operating limit or efficiency threshold on any particular component. If you overload anything, it will heat up, performance will suffer and the life expectancy of the component(s) will drop dramatically. The system as a whole must also be suitable for the model, it makes little sense to deploy a power system intended for a 36 inch span model aircraft weighing 16 ounces into a 72 inch model aircraft weighing 7 pounds. The power system may work just fine in and of itself but it must be suitable for the model it is being installed into, in order to produce satisfactory flight performance.

We are using Current Draw measured on the ground to derive flight times. This is a bit counter intuitive. In almost all configurations and in almost all models, the Current Draw in the air will be less than that measured on the ground during a static test. Flight times therefore are being estimated conservatively here.

Ideally, Current Draw should be measured at the temperature and altitude expected during flight. Temperature and altitude affect air density. Air density decreases (thins) as temperature and altitude increase. Thinner air will affect performance of the propeller and this in turn affects the Current Draw. Hence try to measure the current draw at the temperature and altitude you expect to fly at. Don't worry about small variations in altitude like a few hundred feet, but flying at 5000 feet will produce a different value for Current Draw than flying at sea level and this should be accounted for when estimating flight times.

You will notice that battery voltage is not used in the equation. Battery voltage is very important to the correct operation of the motor and ESC and has an effect on RPM and the selection of an efficient propeller but once a voltage has been selected that is compatible with the model and the various power system components, the voltage thereafter manifests itself in the magnitude of the Current Draw.  

If your battery is not fully charged or is in bad shape you will get significantly shorter flight times.

If the discharge rate approaches or exceeds the battery discharge maximum recommendation you will get significantly shorter flight times and are heading towards imminent battery failure.

Acknowledgments:

We believe in giving credit where credit is due and would like to thank Don Dombrowski of House of Balsa Inc (www.houseofbalsa.com) for providing much of the information in this article.

8.3. Electric Power - Performance at High Altitudes

Question: I live at 5000 feet above sea level. What should I do to get my electric power system to perform at high altitudes as well as it does at sea level?

Answer: It's tough to get the same performance at 5000 or 8000 feet as you do at sea level but we do have a technique that will help you come close.

First of all it's important to understand a few things:

1) Unlike an internal combustion engine (i.e. glow or gas), an electric motor does not consume oxygen and hence could care less about oxygen or anything else that affects combustion.

2) An electric motor system that runs well at sea level will underperform at higher altitudes not because the air has less oxygen but because the air is thinner. Hot weather does the same thing... the air gets thinner. Hot and high together can really gang up and take a chunk out of the performance.

In order to get your electric motor system to perform in thinner air the same way it does at sea level, you may actually have to change the motor, speed control, battery pack and prop but before you go reaching for your credit card here is a technique that attacks the problem from the lowest cost component first.

1) Measure the watts that your power system consumes at sea level or other relatively low altitude location. Use a Medusa Power Analyzer or AstroFlight Whatt meter.

2) Better yet, if possible, use the Medusa Power Analyzer PRO thrust meter to measure the thrust generated and the watts consumed.

3) Now do the same measurements (1 & 2) at the higher altitude location. You will notice that your system consumes less watts and if you are able to measure thrust you will notice that you get less thrust at higher altitude than you do at lower altitude. This is because the air is thinner (less dense) at higher altitudes.

4) In order to get the thrust back up to where it was at lower altitudes you need the prop to move more of the thinner air. To do this, select a higher pitch and/or larger diameter prop for use at higher altitudes. Test again and try to find a prop that gives you the same thrust and/or watt values as you were getting on the original prop at lower altitude. If you can get the same thrust at 5000 feet as you got at sea level for example, you will have similar flight performance. Thrust is really the key here and it's best to work with thrust numbers but watts are a good relative indicator of thrust. Not perfect but still helpful!

Be cautious when testing to ensure that the motor, ESC and battery do not overheat with the new prop. Some compromising may be necessary to get good performance that does not overheat components.

In a perfect world, you would carefully select a specific motor, ESC, battery and prop to get the ideal combination for high altitude performance when installed in a particular model. Yup... perfect is best... but for those of us who can settle for a bit less than ideal and have limited budgets, changing the prop to generate similar thrust in high, hot & thinner air as you get in low, cool & thicker air is a good low cost way to go.    

 

VMA-U160X V-Stik 60 ARF - Electric Power Conversion

For those of you who may be wondering about flying a VMAR V-Stik 60 ARF using Electric Power here is an equipment report from a modeler who has electrified his V-Stik 60 ARF as follows:

  • AXI Outrunner 4120/18
  • 5 Cell LiPo
  • APC 13 x 8.5
  • Reports brisk reliable performance with this power system in the V-Stik 60 ARF

Please note that this report comes from a modeler flying near Durango, CO at approximately 7000 feet above sea level. A lower pitch and/or smaller diameter prop could be used at lower elevations. See the article included below for more information re adjusting for altitude when flying electric.


9. Technical Information - VMAR Products - General
9.1. VMAR - Documents - Common to Many Models that do not require anything more specific.
9.1.1. VMA ARF Products - Using POLYCOTE ECS Covering

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

This READ ME FIRST is common to many VMA ARF Models having

POLYCOTE ECS COVERING 

that did not require anything more specifically tailored to this particular model at the time of production.

A specific READ ME FIRST document may have been subsequently published for this particular model following the production of the model. To check for subsequent publication of a READ ME FIRST document for this model please visit www.richmondrc.com, Enter the Site & click on Support Services. Select Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this model. If a READ ME FIRST document exists for this model it takes precedence.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

9.1.1.1. VMA ARF Products - General Information
 
 
 
 
 
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

9.1.1.2. VMA ARF Products - Supplement to the Manual

 

 

Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
9.1.1.3. VMA ARF Products - Important Information

 

9.1.1.3.1. VMA ARF Products - Covering POLYCOTE ECS


This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering
POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
9.1.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
9.1.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
9.1.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
9.1.2. VMA ARF Products - Using VCOTE Covering

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

 

This READ ME FIRST is common to many VMA ARF Models having

VCOTE COVERING 

that did not require anything more specifically tailored to this particular model at the time of production.

A specific READ ME FIRST document may have been subsequently published for this particular model following the production of the model. To check for subsequent publication of a READ ME FIRST document for this model please visit www.richmondrc.com, Enter the Site & click on Support Services. Select Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this model. If a READ ME FIRST document exists for this model it takes precedence.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

9.1.2.1. VMA ARF Products - General Information

 

 

 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

9.1.2.2. VMA ARF Products - Supplement to the Manual
 
 
 
 
 
Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

9.1.2.3. VMA ARF Products - Important Information

 

9.1.2.3.1. VMA ARF Products - Covering VCOTE

This model uses VCOTE Covering

VCOTE - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.

 

9.1.2.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
9.1.2.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
9.1.2.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
9.1.3. VMA ARF Products - Using VCOTE2 - 3DS Covering

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

 

This READ ME FIRST is common to many VMA ARF Models having

VCOTE2-3DS COVERING 

that did not require anything more specifically tailored to this particular model at the time of production.

A specific READ ME FIRST document may have been subsequently published for this particular model following the production of the model. To check for subsequent publication of a READ ME FIRST document for this model please visit www.richmondrc.com, Enter the Site & click on Support Services. Select Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this model. If a READ ME FIRST document exists for this model it takes precedence.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

9.1.3.1. VMA ARF Products - General Information
 
 
 
 
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

9.1.3.2. VMA ARF Products - Supplement to the Manual

 

 

 
 
Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

9.1.3.3. VMA ARF Products - Important Information

 

9.1.3.3.1. VMA ARF Products - Covering VCOTE2-3DS

This model uses VCOTE2-3DS Covering

VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE2 - 3DS is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE2 - 3DS is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE2 - 3DS, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE2 - 3DS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE2 - 3DS, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13 bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE2 - 3DS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.  

 

9.1.3.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
9.1.3.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
9.1.3.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
9.2. VMAR - Adhesives Related
9.2.1. VMAR - Adhesive Types Used in Production

Question: What adhesives are used in the production of VMAR ARF products? Do you use hot melt glue?

Answer: VMAR ARFS do NOT use hot melt glue... never have. There is some mis-information and some rumours to this effect but they are simply incorrect.

We use PVA, Epoxy and CA adhesives to build VMAR ARF's. We also have a proprietary hinge glue and a proprietary canopy glue that are not unlike some of the aftermarket adhesives designed for the unique challenges of glueing hinges and canopies. 

 

9.2.2. VMAR - Adhesives - Should I add more of my own?

Question: Some of my friends tell me that I should goop up all the pre-assembled joints of every ARF with EPOXY or other heavy duty adhesive because ARF manufacturers skimp on adhesives and if I can't see the adhesive it can't be there. Should I do this?

Answer: This is not necessary with VMAR ARFS. We use primarily PVA and CA which dry pretty well clear. We also know how to use these adhesives in an industrial setting so that they don't run all over the place. We also use Epoxy for major structural areas like firewalls and this is easier to see. Frankly, when you add more adhesive on your own,  you are adding weight, spending money on adhesives and likely accomplishing precious little else.

We have built and flown literally hundreds of VMAR ARF's since 1998. We have never supplemented a joint with extra adhesive and we have never had a structural failure. That gives us quite a bit of confidence in saying that the adhesives we use and the way we use them give good results.  

To make everyone a bit more comfortable and to cater somewhat to those who advise to get out your trowel and ladle on the 30 minute epoxy... here is what we would recommend if you want to add a little adhesive on your own.

First of all, this does not apply to the wing joint. Follow the assembly instructions re the wing joint... use only 30 minute epoxy for joining wings.

Aside from the wing joint:

  • Work with adequate ventilation when using adhesives. Avoid skin and eye contact. Do not breath vapors. Read the directions and warnings that came with the adhesive. Be attentive to possible alergic responses such as rashes, breathing difficulties etc. Again, read the instructions and pay attention to any warnings that come with the adhesive.
  • Use Pacer ZAP/CA (pink bottle) which is a super thin fast drying CA. Nothing wicks into joints like ZAP/CA. Just lightly touch up inside the radio bay formers. Wick the CA into the triangle or square stock joints around the formers.
  • For plywood joints or where you want a small fillet of adhesive, use Pacer ZAP-A-GAP CA+ which is a medium thickness CA+. ZAP-A-GAP CA+ loves plywoods and tolerates acidic PH, dirt, oil, pitch, resin, other adhesives, surface roughness and gap joint better than any CA we have ever used. It does not wick as well as ZAP/CA but it is better for the rougher joints, plywoods, laminates, hardwoods and wherever a small fillet is desired after a primary bond has formed. 
  • After applying the ZAP/CA and ZAP-A-GAP CA+, give a the fuselage radio bay a fine mist blast of ZIP KICKER from about 12" away. Use the hand pump spritzer with a vigorous 1 or two pumps or a brief shot from the new ZIP KICKER aerosol dispenser. Set the fuselage aside for a minute and you are done.

This method adds very very little weight, gives you that extra reassurance you were looking for and is clean, neat and effective.

 

9.3. VMAR - Canopy (Window) Cleaning - How to Tips

Question: What is the best way to go about cleaning a canopy or formed clear plastic window on a VMAR model?

Answer: First things first... regardless of what cleaner or solvent or method you use, TEST TEST TEST on a small out of the way area of the plastic before proceeding further. It is almost impossible to guarantee how any particular solution will work with any particular plastic without testing first.
 
Second, please review the related article (see below) re cleaning a model in general. There are some relatively common but very scary cleaners out there that can really make a mess out of your model.
 
Third, please review the related article (see below) re cleaning POLYCOTE ECS. This method has been found to work well on most canopies and clear plastic formed parts as well. Remember TEST TEST TEST.
 
Lastly, if the blemish will not go away, you may want to consider replacing the part. Please review the related article (see below) about replacing canopies and formed clear plastic windows. Before launching into a replacement operation we suggest considering if it is worthwhile. Blemishes in clear plastic are common and you may replace a canopy today only to have a new scuff mark or blemish again tomorrow. Enjoy your ARF model and your RC hobby and confine the replacement effort to when it is really necessary like when you have a hole or crack.
9.4. VMAR - Canopy (Window) Replacement - How to Tips

Question: What is the best way to go about replacing a Canopy or formed clear plastic windshield or window on a VMAR model?

Answer: Actually it is not difficult if you go about it the right way. Please review the entire process listed below before actually doing anything.  

The key to this process is to NOT remove the entire old canopy off the model. If you take the old canopy entirely off the model you run the risk of damaging the covering AND will have a more difficult time aligning the new canopy into position.

1) First of all do NOT totally remove the old canopy!  We don't want to take a chance on spoiling the covering so we are going to leave the portion of the old canopy in place that currently is bonded to the covering.

2) Instead of removing the old canopy, carefully clean it all off with Fantastic and paper towels. This will remove all oil, dirt and grime. Clean the canopy and surrounding fuselage area twice.

3) Use Pacer (the ZAP people) RC56 Canopy Glue or Pacer DAP-A-GOO to carefully bond any loose spots of the bird cage back into place on the fuselage. If you've had a crash carefully retrieve and reuse as must of the bird cage "bottom edge" as possible. Ideally you want the bird cage contact area firmly bonded to the fuselage. Will CA work... yes but be careful to avoid "clorosis" which leaves a white powder like residue... use Pacer Poly Zap or Plasti Zap to reduce clorosis effects. Best of all is the Canopy Glue.  

3) Now take a new SHARP #11 Xacto blade and carefully cut the canopy just above the surrounding "bird cage" or frame material. We want to leave the bird cage in place.  If you have a model that has a canopy without a bird cage or frame, cut the canopy just above where it is bonded to the fuselage.

4) Now inspect the remaining bird cage or canopy and make sure that it is bonded to the fuselage... you can work from "inside" the canopy area now if you have to.

5) Carefully trial fit the new canopy on top of the remains of the old bird cage or remainder of the old canopy if no bird cage was present. You should get a nearly perfect fit, particularly when using the old bird cage. The simulated rivets will key exactly into the new canopy rivets.

6) After trial fitting the new bird cage, use Pacer RC56 Canopy glue to carefully bond it into place. Clean up any excess adhesive before it cures. Check several times in case adhesive oozes out. Use low tack masking tape to hold the new canopy into place until the RC56 has thoroughly dried.

That's it!

9.5. VMAR - CG Location - General Guidelines

Question: How do I know where the CG (Center of Gravity) is to be located on my model?

Answer: Always refer to the instruction manual and documentation that came with your model. There is usually a diagram and/or explanation of where the CG lies in each manual. Any changes after the manual is printed are reflected in documents included with the kit. If the documentation has been misplaced and/or you want to double check, use our Knowledge Base and search on CG or look for your specific model in the listing of products.

Information: In the event that you cannot obtain any documentation related to your model and wish to locate the CG here is a procedure that you may wish to try. The CG is generally located just forward of the thickest part of the wing. Setting the CG slightly further forward will not hurt, it will limit the aerobatic capabilities of the model if the CG is too far forward but it will not cause loss of control. the CG too far back makes the model unstable, difficult to control and will often result in a crash. If you are stuck with no solid information at all we suggest setting the CG  3/4" forward of the thickest part of a non-swept wing for initial flights and then gradually moving it back to about 1/4-1/2" forward of the thickest part of the wing but only if the model remains stable in flight.

This procedure works reasonably well for non-swept wings. For swept wings, the thickest part of the wing also tends to sweep back with distance out from the fuselage. To roughly set the CG on a swept wing model we suggest going with a location that represents 25% of the area of the wing. This is the location from which a line running at right angles (perpendicular) from the fuselage will disect the wing such that 25% of the wing area is forward of this line and 75% of the wing area is aft of this line. After initial flights you may wish to move the CG back towards about the 30% mark but only if the model remains stable in flight.
 
Use of "CG Machine": Unfortunately, our comments in this regard are not very positive. Over many years we have noticed that when we get questions from modelers about CG, that 99% of the time they are using a "CG Machine" of some sort and get totally confused about how to use it and in many cases have erroneous information about the CG location of their model.
 
In our opinion, for the vast majority of RC Aircraft applications, such "CG Machines" are tools looking for a purpose. Yes, if you have a swept wing biplane with non-symmetric mass in all three axis and you are entering the Tournament of Champions and know little about CG in model airplanes, you might get some use out of a "CG Machine" IF IF IF you took a few hours to study the device carefully and read the instructions thoroughly.
 
However, if you are not in this rather august group, there are more practical, faster, easier and cheaper ways to set up the CG on your RC model airplane without spending money, getting yourself confused or frustrated.
 
1) Check the documentation that came with your model and any support information that may be on the suppliers web site or knowledge base. From this determine "where" the CG is supposed to be. We will call where the CG is supposed to be, the "CG Datum Point".
 
2) Mark the CG Datum Point on the model.
 
3) For a high wing model extend the CG Datum Point out to the wing tips. If the leading edge (LE) of the wing is straight, use that as your reference point. If, for example, the CG Datum Point is 3" back from the LE of  the wing then mark this on the wing tips. In any event the CG Datum Point should be extended out to the wing tips at right angles (90 degrees) to the thrust line running from the spinner to the tail.
 
4) Put your fingers on or under the wing tips where the CG Datum points are. Lift the model. If it is balanced, you are good to go. If the tail drops, move your battery forward or add small amounts of weight to the nose until it balances. If the nose drops you can leave it slightly nose heavy for training and first flights and then shift your battery back or add a bit of weight to the tail to balance it later on. If the nose drops a great deal, you are very nose heavy and should fix this before flying by shifting weight aft until the model is balanced.
 
5) For a low wing model, you can extend the CG Datum Point out to the wing tips in the same manner as for a high wing model OR better yet, invert the model and screw a cup hook ($.05 cents at the hardware store) into the wing center joint at the CG Datum Point. Hang the model from the cup hook using a piece of string. If it is balanced, you are good to go. If the tail drops, move your battery forward or add small amounts of weight to the nose until it balances. If the nose drops you can leave it slightly nose heavy for training and first flights and then shift your battery back or add a bit of weight to the tail to balance it later on. If the nose drops a great deal, you are very nose heavy and should fix this before flying by shifting weight aft until the model is balanced.
 
The "cup hook" method can also be used for high wing models if you can put a cup hook into top of the fuselage at the CG Datum Point. The cup hook method offers the advantage of also being able to balance the model across the wing span. The wings should also be level when hanging. If not, add weight to the high wing tip by pushing nails or lead pellets into the bottom of the high wing tip and using CA or Epoxy to retain them. You can also use stick on weights.
 
This is not intended to be a treatise on CG Datum Points or adjusting CG locations but it is a good practical simple approach that works for most trainers, fun-fly, sport, scale and pattern airplanes. If you are into something more exotic there are additional considerations.
 
 
9.6. VMAR - Cleaning Model Aircraft

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model aircraft. What should I be aware of when cleaning it after flying?

Answer: Couple of general suggestions here and a few DO NOT DO caveats. See the additional information below for more details. We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and you can dilute it 50/50 with water. Always test any cleaner on a small out of view area first. Avoid overspray on plastics. Spray cleaner lightly (do NOT flood) and wipe away cleaner and dirt/oil with disposable towels as soon as possible after spraying. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane.

Additional Information: VMAR models are covered in V-Cote, POLYCOTE ECS and VCOTE-2 3DS. All of these materials are heat shrink film. V-Cote is flatter in gloss and tolerates up to 15% nitro fuel well. Higher nitro fuel can soften V-Cote graphics if allowed to sit on the surface for extended periods of time. POLYCOTE ECS is higher in gloss. VCOTE-2 3DS has a medium gloss and has 3D indentations for some panel lines and rivets. POLYCOTE and VCOTE-2 3DS can tolerate high nitro fuels and other fuel types. Always wipe away raw fuel quickly in any event.

All of these covering materials clean well with Fantastic and many other household cleaners. We recommend Fantastic diluted 50/50 with water. Always test on a small out of view area first when working with any cleaner. Do NOT flood or over spray. Avoid spraying directly on plastic components and canopies. Wipe away cleaner and residue immediately after spraying with cleaner using disposable paper towels. 

Do NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane. Simple Green and 409 are good products for cutting grease and other industrial/commercial type applications but they are intended for use on non-porous materials and contain powerful chemicals that are not compatible with adhesives, balsa wood and other material found in a model aircraft. Use a web search engine to search on Simple Green and/or 409 and note the warnings and chemicals appliable to these and similar products. Do NOT NOT NOT use other cleaners having similar chemicals to those found in Simple Green or 409.

Here is a link to information related to 409: http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~jsmith/MSDS/FORMULA%20409%20CLEANER.htm

What can SIMPLE GREEN, 409 and similar cleaners do to your model? Well... it depends. If you are not concerned about the safety aspects of these products and spray these materials on a paper towel and then use the damp towel to wipe down your model (avoid plastics) these products seem to do a good job of cutting grease and cleaning the model and many modelers like these cleaners. However, if you spray the material on to the model rather than the towel, you run the risk of the cleaner running into seams, cavities, hinge slots, covering joints and onto plastic components etc. These type of cleaners are intended for non-porous materials and if they wick or run into adhesive joints, hinge slots or under covering they can loosen the covering (this has been going on for years and modelers sometimes fight back with CA on the joint) AND react with some adhesives to soften and weaken the bond. We have also seen these type of cleaners react with adhesive commonly used to glue hinges and canopies into place and leave an ugly looking dark green stain under the covering where it has wicked further into the wooden substrate. This cannot be repaired and will continue to spread if more Simple Green, 409 or similar cleaner finds its way into the same area. We have also seen these type of cleaners attack plastic... generally the plastic does not dissolve or soften, instead it gets dry, hard, brittle and will over time crack and flake off.

In summary it would be best to use the cleaner and the techniques we recommend. If you are fond of your particular cleaner then at least make sure you follow the techniques we have outlined above. Test first. Do not flood or overspray. Wipe away quickly. Best to spray on the towel rather than the model. Make sure no cleaner can get into the model substrate such as the balsa or plywood materials... stay away from hinge slots, seams, cavities, joints, adhesive bonds etc. Protect plastics from direct contact with cleaners and/or long term exposure to cleaners.

Related Articles:

For each type of covering we use, there may be additional articles related to cleaning that particular covering. To check for Related Articles please use the Search tool near the top left of the Knowledge Base window and search on the word "Clean". Type just the letters Clean (clean) into the search box and then click on the button marked Search. The search tool will return a list of articles having "Clean" in the header or body. We suggest reviewing the articles related to the covering on your particular model.

 

9.7. VMAR - Construction
9.7.1. Construction - Triangle Stock - Where is it Used?

Question: Do VMAR ARFs make use of triangle stock to expand the bonding area of right angle joints?

Answer: Yes. We use triangle stock whereever a right angle joint is under stress and needs an expanded bonding area. In some cases the stock is square and in other cases it is triangle shaped but the intent and the result is the same.

Primary areas where you will see this are on the formers fore and aft of the radio bay, behind the firewall and under the wing mounting blocks.

In some cases the triangle or square stock may not be visible upon casual inspection... look carefully on both sides of the formers. In response to user inquiries we have tended to put the extra stock where it is more visible since 2003.

9.8. VMAR - Control Surfaces
VMAR control surfaces are built up rather than solid stock. This makes them lighter, faster to deploy and greatly reduces the chances of a warp occuring.  
 
With very few exceptions, VMAR control surfaces are pre-hinged and installed at the factory. Always check control surfaces when building and before every flight to ensure that they are firmly attached to the aircraft.
9.8.1. VMAR - Control Surfaces - Fixing Warps
VMAR control surfaces seldom warp due to their unique construction method. Occasionally a control surface will warp. This is nearly always found immediately following shipping and is due to the control surface being subject to loads and bending forces during transit.
 
Here are some hints that will help you resolve warps in control surfaces:
1) Always inspect components before attaching them with glue to anything else. Once a component is glued, you are pretty much on your own to resolve problems that may occur or be found later. Do a careful check out before gluing anything.
 
2) Most warps are small. Although everyone strives for perfection, a small warp will have minimal impact on the flying characteristics of a model aircraft once you trim the model in flight. Yes, trimming to counter a warp will induce minor drag but we are not flying the space shuttle... it's a model!
 
3) For larger warps or warps that you just feel you must try to fix, use a #11 blade to cut the hinges. Leave the stubs in the leading and trailing edges, just trim them down. Take the warped surface and bend it opposite to the warp and hold it under tension for a minute or so. Let go and see of the warp is still present or comes back over a 10 minute period. If it does not, rehinge and reattach the control surface being careful to align it properly.
 
If the quick de-warping procedure outlined above does not solve your problem, use an iron and heat gun to warm the warped area on both sides without damaging the covering. You want to get the wood warm but not muck up the covering. Once the wood around the warp is warm on both sides, take the warped surface and bend it opposite to the warp so that you have over-corrected the warp by a degree or so. Hold the control surface securely and let it cool completely. Don't relax the dewarping pressure until the control surface is cool. Rehinge and reattach the control surface being careful to align it properly.
 
4) If neither of these two de-warping procedures works for you, please contact Richmond RC Supply Ltd (see our contact info) and open a Priorty Response Ticket or request a return authorisation number by email. Upon receipt we will review the component and follow up with you shortly thereafter.
 
  
 
 
9.9. VMAR - Covering - General Information
9.9.1. VMAR - Covering - How to Identify What Type of Covering is on My Model.

Question: How can I identify what type of covering is on my VMAR model?

Answer: It's not hard. Just look for these tell-tale signs.

  • POLYCOTE ECS - The finish is glossy with a deep pearl like finish as if you are looking through a layer of clear plastic (cause you are!). Nothing else looks like POLYCOTE ECS!
  • VCOTE - Except for white, the colors are generally flat. Used on older models AND on some warbirds where a flat camoflage finish is desired.
  • VCOTE2-3DSVC - Used on higher end models where more scale like 3D detailing is required. It has a a glossy or semi-glossy finish but most importantly some of the rivets and panel lines are indented into the surface to give a true 3D look and feel to the detailing. Run your finger nail across a variety of panel lines, if any of the lines are indented... you've got VCOTE2-3DS on your model.

If you need a bit more help with this, check out the descriptions and key features of each covering type as shown below.

POLYCOTE ECS - What is it?

POLYCOTE ECS is a proprietary Enhanced Covering System engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR.

  • With POLYCOTE ECS the graphics are inside the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • POLYCOTE ECS utilizes ULTRA TOUGH polyester and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • Best of all POLYCOTE is totally fuel proof!

Quite simply... POLYCOTE ECS leads the pack in ARF covering systems! By putting the graphics where they belong... inside the POLYESTER covering... we've eliminated the need for decals and overlays and reduced  maintenance to a minimum. No overlays edges to pick up, very few seams, extraordinary fuel proofing etc. With POLYCOTE ECS you will spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

POLYCOTE ECS offers the best in covering performance!

VCOTE2-3DS - What is it?

VCOTE2-3DS is a proprietary 3D Detailing System engineered in Canada and used on our premium VMAR ARF models where scale detailing and a tough long lasting covering is essential! Rivets and some of the hatches and panel lines are actually 3D. They stand up on the surface skin like the real thing!

VCOTE2-3DS is totally different and simply the best covering and detailing system available. VCOTE2-3DS builds on our VCOTE technology and goes a lot farther. All the detailing is inside the covering... no decals, no strips, no stripes and totally fuel proof.

Best of all... VCOTE2-3DS is very very sag resistant. Extensively tested in direct sunlight and heated air up to 130F!

  • With VCOTE2-3DS the graphics are pre-applied to the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • VCOTE2-3DS utilizes a tough heat shrinkable film and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • VCOTE2-3DS is fuel proof. We recommend dabing up any raw unburned high nitro fuel as a precaution.

By pre-applying the the graphics... we've eliminated the need for decals or overlays completely and reduced the need for maintenance to a minimum. No decal or overlay edges to pick up, and very few seams. With VCOTE2-3DS you will have a great model that looks terrific right out of the box and spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

VCOTE2-3DS 3D Detailing System - Only from VMAR!

 

9.9.2. VMAR - Covering - Color Changes
Question: Does covering change color over time?
 
Answer: Yes.
 
To varying degree's nearly all colors and types of heat shrink plastic covering will change color over time when exposed to light and/or heat. Bright sunlight and hot temperatures tend to accelerate the process.
 
Flourescent colors and most shades of blue and purple will show the most change when exposed to light and will tend to fade or appear more muted when exposed to light.
 
VCOTE and VCOTE2-3DS may also change color when exposed to raw high nitro fuel and/or non-approved cleaning solvents.
 
 
9.9.3. VMAR - Covering - Custom Graphics
Question: Are VMAR models available with Custom Graphics?
 
Answer: Yes.
 
There is a set up a charge and a minimum run quantity. Custom Graphics are viable for hobby shops and clubs who wish to promote their organization. Please email sales@richmondrc.com for more information.
 
Please note that Custom Graphics will be very expensive if the run size is small hence this service is not recommended for run sizes of less than 25.  
9.9.4. VMAR - Covering - Not Factory Applied
Question: Are VMAR models available without the factory applied covering? I'd like to get just the bare wood model and cover it myself.  
 
Answer: Yes.
 
This is a special order requiring 50% payment at time of order and 50% when we are ready to ship. Lead time is 120 days. To order OnLine please add a note to your order (in the notes or comments section) specifying WITHOUT COVERING.
 
Please note that due to the need for additional packaging and handling to protect the bare non-covered framework, shipping charges are double the normal rates and that there is NO product warranty and NO insurance available for shipping damage. These products are sold as FINAL SALE items and subject to the same terms & conditions as our Final Sale items. Please see the following link for further information on the Terms and Conditions associated with FINAL SALE items:

 

POLYCOTE ECS - Tools - For working with POLYCOTE ECS

 

9.9.5. VMAR - Covering - Patch Material - Availability

Question: The documentation that was included with my model, refers to patch sheets. I did not get these. What's the story here?

Answer: Due to continual upgrading of the covering material, since early 2005 patch sheets are NOT shipped with the model. Please see the Knowledge Base article related to the covering on your model and then consult the Care & Maintenance > Repairing Punctures article for further information on patching punctures.

Covering Patch Material and Covering Sets are available as after market items. Please see the VMAR OnLine Store at www.richmondrc.com

Covering Patch Material is sold as a generic set suitable for most models. This is available as part# VMA-PATCHPAK. You may also wish to consider the appropriate covering set for your particular model.

If you wish to jump straight to the parts section of the VMAR OnLine Store please go to:  http://www.richmondrc.com/shop2/VMA_USA_Retail.html.  To locate the generic set of Covering Patch Material use the search engine and search on Patch. To find the covering set for your particular model, we suggest searching on the part number of the model itself or the name of the model. Searching on SUB-COVERSET may also prove helpful.

9.9.6. VMAR - Covering - Patches vs Sets - What's the Difference?
Question: What is the difference between Covering Patches and Covering Sets?

Answer:
Covering Sets contain all the covering applicable to the set type. For example a Covering Set for a Wing contains all the covering for that wing.
 
Covering Patch Material is available in two forms.
a) A generic patch set suitable for many models that is available as part# VMA-PATCHPAK. This contains a variety of color swatches that work on many models but no attempt is made to try to provide a perfect color match to any particular model.
 
b) A patch set made from the particular covering for a specific model. Basically a complete set of actual covering is cut up into small swatches and pieces. Each patch set contains about 1/12 of the covering set for that model.
 If you wish to jump straight to the parts section of the VMAR OnLine Store please go to:  http://www.richmondrc.com/shop2/VMA_USA_Retail.html.  To locate the generic set of Covering Patch Material use the search engine and search on Patch. To find the covering set or patches for your particular model, we suggest searching on the part number of the model itself or the name of the model. Searching on SUB-COVERSET may also prove helpful.
9.9.7. VMAR - Covering - POLYCOTE ECS - Information & Tips
9.9.7.1. POLYCOTE ECS - What is it?

POLYCOTE ECS is a proprietary Enhanced Covering System engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR.

  • With POLYCOTE ECS the graphics are inside the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • POLYCOTE ECS utilizes ULTRA TOUGH polyester and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • Best of all POLYCOTE is totally fuel proof!

Quite simply... POLYCOTE ECS leads the pack in ARF covering systems! By putting the graphics where they belong... inside the POLYESTER covering... we've eliminated the need for decals and overlays and reduced  maintenance to a minimum. No overlays edges to pick up, very few seams, extraordinary fuel proofing etc. With POLYCOTE ECS you will spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

POLYCOTE ECS offers the best in covering performance!

9.9.7.2. POLYCOTE ECS - Can I see the difference?

Question: With POLYCOTE ECS can I actually see the difference?

Answer: You Bet! Nothing beats having the real thing to look at but even on the web you can see the difference. Check out the image below of the VMAR Edge 540T 45-60 ARF ECS using POLYCOTE ECS. Zoom it out by clicking on the image. Now look carefully at the yellow on blue star field and the stylized US Flag and you will see gradient composite colors... possible ONLY with POLYCOTE ECS from VMAR!.

 

Check out the tail detailing (second image shown below) on the VMAR Edge 540T 45-60 ARF ECS using POLYCOTE ECS. With any other covering system this type of detail would be done using decals, overlays and stripes. Worse yet, the factory would leave it "blank" and you would have to do the tedious hours long task yourself. With POLYCOTE ECS all the graphics are inside the covering where they belong. The graphics are totally fuel proof beneath a factory applied rich deep lustre clear layer of POLYCOTE  ECS! No decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes! No work! Nothing to peal up, flak off or snag when you clean your model. ONLY with POLYCOTE ECS from VMAR!.

9.9.7.3. POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance Tips

 

9.9.7.3.1. POLYCOTE ECS - Introduction - Care & Maintenance

 

9.9.7.3.2. POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
9.9.7.3.3. POLYCOTE ECS - Avoid Hot Vehicles parked in the Sun

Question: I inadvertently left my model locked in my closed van all afternoon in the hot desert sun? Will this have any effect on the POLYCOTE ECS covering?

Answer: Nothing permanent but you will likely have some sagging at least the first and second time you do this. At the risk of sounding facetious... cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions and if your model is stuck in this environment with no circulation for hours and hours, sagging is often the result.

We recommend avoiding this type of problem. Keep the model out of situations where the temperature is extreme with little or no circulation.

If it has occurred, there is no point in crying over spilt milk...  if you see sagging, don't panic! BEFORE you do anything at all, please review the Tip on Tightening Sags in POLYCOTE ECS.  Sagging is fixable (a whole model can be done in less than an hour) but only if you go about it properly. If you jump into this with your heat iron and heat gun assuming you know how to do this because you've fixed Monokote sags and bubbles for years, you have a high probabilty of making a botch of this and you will be stuck with a rather unpleasant result.

 

9.9.7.3.4. POLYCOTE ECS - Cleaning After Flying

Question: I have been flying my model using a glow or gasoline engine. I have some oil residue on the model along with some bug guts and a bit of dirt from a less than perfect landing. How do I clean it up?

Answer:  To clean POLYCOTE ECS after flying we recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Wipe along seams, not across. To really show off your POLYCOTE ECS covering, after cleaning wtih Fantastic... use a bit of Armorall and buff dry & shiny.

Please carefully review the following information and take particular note if you are planning on using Simple Green, 409 or similar non-approved cleaners.

VMAR - Cleaning Model Aircraft

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model aircraft. What should I be aware of when cleaning it after flying?

Answer: Couple of general suggestions here and a few DO NOT DO caveats. See the additional information below for more details. We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and you can dilute it 50/50 with water. Always test any cleaner on a small out of view area first. Avoid overspray on plastics. Spray cleaner lightly (do NOT flood) and wipe away cleaner and dirt/oil with disposable towels as soon as possible after spraying. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane.

Additional Information: VMAR models are covered in V-Cote, POLYCOTE ECS and VCOTE-2 3DS. All of these materials are heat shrink film. V-Cote is flatter in gloss and tolerates up to 15% nitro fuel well. Higher nitro fuel can soften V-Cote graphics if allowed to sit on the surface for extended periods of time. POLYCOTE ECS is higher in gloss. VCOTE-2 3DS has a medium gloss and has 3D indentations for some panel lines and rivets. POLYCOTE and VCOTE-2 3DS can tolerate high nitro fuels and other fuel types. Always wipe away raw fuel quickly in any event.

All of these covering materials clean well with Fantastic and many other household cleaners. We recommend Fantastic diluted 50/50 with water. Always test on a small out of view area first when working with any cleaner. Do NOT flood or over spray. Avoid spraying directly on plastic components and canopies. Wipe away cleaner and residue immediately after spraying with cleaner using disposable paper towels. 

Do NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane. Simple Green and 409 are good products for cutting grease and other industrial/commercial type applications but they are intended for use on non-porous materials and contain powerful chemicals that are not compatible with adhesives, balsa wood and other material found in a model aircraft. Use a web search engine to search on Simple Green and/or 409 and note the warnings and chemicals appliable to these and similar products. Do NOT NOT NOT use other cleaners having similar chemicals to those found in Simple Green or 409.

Here is a link to information related to 409: http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~jsmith/MSDS/FORMULA%20409%20CLEANER.htm

What can SIMPLE GREEN, 409 and similar cleaners do to your model? Well... it depends. If you are not concerned about the safety aspects of these products and spray these materials on a paper towel and then use the damp towel to wipe down your model (avoid plastics) these products seem to do a good job of cutting grease and cleaning the model and many modelers like these cleaners. However, if you spray the material on to the model rather than the towel, you run the risk of the cleaner running into seams, cavities, hinge slots, covering joints and onto plastic components etc. These type of cleaners are intended for non-porous materials and if they wick or run into adhesive joints, hinge slots or under covering they can loosen the covering (this has been going on for years and modelers sometimes fight back with CA on the joint) AND react with some adhesives to soften and weaken the bond. We have also seen these type of cleaners react with adhesive commonly used to glue hinges and canopies into place and leave an ugly looking dark green stain under the covering where it has wicked further into the wooden substrate. This cannot be repaired and will continue to spread if more Simple Green, 409 or similar cleaner finds its way into the same area. We have also seen these type of cleaners attack plastic... generally the plastic does not dissolve or soften, instead it gets dry, hard, brittle and will over time crack and flake off.

In summary it would be best to use the cleaner and the techniques we recommend. If you are fond of your particular cleaner then at least make sure you follow the techniques we have outlined above. Test first. Do not flood or overspray. Wipe away quickly. Best to spray on the towel rather than the model. Make sure no cleaner can get into the model substrate such as the balsa or plywood materials... stay away from hinge slots, seams, cavities, joints, adhesive bonds etc. Protect plastics from direct contact with cleaners and/or long term exposure to cleaners.

Related Articles:

For each type of covering we use, there may be additional articles related to cleaning that particular covering. To check for Related Articles please use the Search tool near the top left of the Knowledge Base window and search on the word "Clean". Type just the letters Clean (clean) into the search box and then click on the button marked Search. The search tool will return a list of articles having "Clean" in the header or body. We suggest reviewing the articles related to the covering on your particular model.

 

9.9.7.3.5. POLYCOTE ECS - Cleaning Initially

Question: I have my model all assembled and have a few streaks or other residue on the POLYCOTE ECS covering. How do I clean these off.

Answer:  POLYCOTE ECS has very few seams and we use our SURE SEAL system to really lock the seams down. Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS when looked at under bright light this is a light residue from the SURE SEAL process. It is easily removed using Minerial Spirits (Paint Thinner, Varsol). If you've ever painted with oil base paints you probably have Mineral Spirits on hand already, if not, it is readily available at a paint or hardware store. It is recommended that you work with Mineral Spirits outdoors and follow the directions on the container. Use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Use a clean towel to buff dry. If you want to accentuate the deep "clear cote" gloss of POLYCOTE ECS even more, use a bit of Armorall and buff shiny with a clean paper towel. Discard all soiled paper towels into a metal garbage can stored outdoors.

 

9.9.7.3.6. POLYCOTE ECS - How to Cut.

Question: POLYCOTE ECS is tough stuff! How do I cut it?

Answer: POLYCOTE ECS is made from Ultra Tough Polyester. Where possible, use scissors to cut POLYCOTE. Scissors work well. Otherwise use a new sharp #11 Blade. The blade must be SHARP.

 

9.9.7.3.7. POLYCOTE ECS - Pealing - What should I do?

Question: I've been flying my VMAR model for a while and notice that a small area of covering appears to have lifted at an edge and looks like it is pealing back. What should I do?

Answer: Don't panic! This is generally repairable. This can occur in two ways.

a) If the color layer is still bonded to the underside of the clear polyester layer, use a heat iron and soft heat iron sock to iron the loose layer back into place. If the seam is on a curve such as a leading or trailing edge or at the edge of a cutout like a servo cavity, you might want to wick thin CA along the exposed seam after you have reseated the covering to ensure the edge does not pick up again.

b) If the color layer has remained on the model and only the clear polyester layer has pulled away, you can try the same method as outlined in a) above but you will need more heat to rebond the clear layer to the model. If this does not work, you can either remove the clear layer where it is loose and recover the exposed section with clear UltraCote (UltraCote is made also made from Polyester) or you can apply a thin coat of latex contact cement (spray on works well) to the exposed area and the underside of the clear loose film and after the contact cement has dried to tacky, firmly press the loose film back into place working towards the edge. Work slowly and wipe back and forth as you press downwards. If you do do not have access to contact cement you might want to try a product called Balsarite from Coverite products which is specifically made to help increase the bond strenght between most coverings and balsa wood. . Seal the edge with CA as outlined in a) above.

 

9.9.7.3.8. POLYCOTE ECS - Protecting the Finish - What should I do?

Question: I've been flying my VMAR model for a while and it looks great. Is there anything that I need to do protect the finish to ensure it lasts.

Answer: POLYCOTE ECS is pretty tough stuff and does not need kid glove handling. If you do the following you should get good durability for the life of the model.

  • Most Importantly - Follow the Cleaning instructions. Use the recommended Cleaners and Method.
  • Secondly, remove raw fuel from the canopy, plastic parts and around seams as soon as possible. Dab it off gently and then clean with Fantastic.
  • Test anything you apply to any covering, plastic or component. It's a good idea to assume that whatever is made there is something that can attack it. Test any glue, paint, cleaner, sealer, wax or anything else you may feel inclined to try on your model by applying the material to a small out of the way area first. If you get a reaction, a small blemish is better than having your canopy curl up or the covering turn black overnight. We've run into some very strang situations over the years... 99.9% of these would have been avoided by testing first.
  • Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun. UV light can play hell with pigments especially dark colors and flourescents. This does not mean you need to go around covering your model every 15 minutes but if you can get it out of the sun after a few hours we would suggest that's a good way to go.
  • Patch holes and tack down any loose seams as soon as possible after the problem is noticed.

That's about it. Nothing to really sweat over... basically common sense.

 

9.9.7.3.9. POLYCOTE ECS - Removing & Using Tape

Question: Some of my control surfaces have arrived from the factory with tape holding them in place during shipment. Is there a correct method for removing the tape.

Answer: When removing tape from POLYCOTE ECS (or any covering for that matter), peal the tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering. If the tape is near or across a seam or an edge, peal towards the edge or seam. Do NOT pull the tape up at right angles to the covering or away from a seam or edge.

If you use your own tape during the assembly process, use a low tack masking tape and remove it using the procedure noted above.

 

9.9.7.3.10. POLYCOTE ECS - Repairing Punctures - How to Patch.

Question: I have a puncture in my POLYCOTE ECS.  How do I patch this?

Answer:  If you puncture POLYCOTE ECS, clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. We clean using Fantastic and then a paper towel moistened with Pacer De-Bonder or alcohol or water to remove any remaining residue from the surface. The patch should be 1/2" (13 mm) bigger than the hole on all sides.

It may be difficult to match colors or patterns. When you run into this challenge, you might want to take a different approach. Rather than try to match the color or pattern, deliberately use a black white or silver patch and cut it into the shape of a panel hatch. Detail this with lettering and a perimeter line and it will look like the hatch is supposed to be there. Another trick is to cut the patch into a shape of a letter, flag or aircraft marking.

We recommend using after market POLYCOTE patching material or polyester covering such as POLYCOTE, ULTRACOTE or ORACOVER and the use of a heat iron and soft cloth. Monokote, SolarFilm or V-COTE covering material will also work. Cut the patch with rounded corners. Seal the patch in place with a heat iron set at 250F first and then tighten the patch and the original covering around the patch as outlined in the tightening tip. You may need to experiment a bit with the temperature of your iron depending on the patch material you are using.

To repair larger more extensive damage areas, you may wish to obtain the appropriate POLYCOTE ECS covering set for your model

 

9.9.7.3.11. POLYCOTE ECS - Seam Loose - How to Reseal.

Question: One of the seams on my model has come loose. What have I done wrong? What should I do to reseal it?

Answer: Although we are very careful to tack all seams down and then to seal them as well, we are not perfect (although we're trying!) so the loosening of a seam may not be due to anything you are doing. Once a seam is in place properly we advise being very careful when cleaning the model to avoid wiping across the seam... wipe parallel to it. There are very few seams on VMAR models.

Generally seams are located at:

  • The trailing edge of the wing (hidden by the aileron),
  • The leading edge of the wing if swept or tapered,
  • The leading and trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer,
  • 1 or more seams on the bottom of the fuselage,
  • Some models with shaped turtle decks may have a seam at the top of the fuselage running more or less along the spine.

If you do have a loose edge, clean any oil residue from the area and the edge and reseal with thin CA.

 

9.9.7.3.12. POLYCOTE ECS - How to Tighten Sags

Question: My model is covered with POLYCOTE ECS and I have noticed that there are some sags in the covering. What is causing this? Can I fix it? What should I do?

Answer: It helps to understand how the sags develop before we get into tightening things up to get rid of the sags.

In low humidity air such as is found in the hot desert areas or in continental winter conditions where cold outside air is brought inside and heated to 22C ( 70F), the underlying structure is drying and shrinking. Many modelers feel that the sags are caused by heat and to a point they are correct because hot conditions are often dry and most definitely heat is the key to solving the problem. However, the real underlying cause is low humidity air drying the structure out and as the structure drys it gets lighter and smaller. POLYCOTE ECS will not shrink at normal room temperatures and you end up with,  in effect,  more covering on your model than you need!

The way to get rid of the sags is to shrink the POLYCOTE ECS with a heat gun and rub it down into the substrate with a soft cloth once it has shrunk. Before you start firing up your flame thrower, please note the following procedure... if you get the method down pat, you will get a good result and not have to do this more than 1-2 times... 3 times at most. However if you assume that POLYCOTE ECS is like Monokote or SolarFilm, you will make a hash of it and you will not be happy with the outcome. POLYCOTE ECS is polyester and the technique for shinking it is similar to that used for ORACOVER (ULTRACOTE).

Remember SSB! As in 

SECURE the perimeter.

SHRINK to fit

BOND to the structure.

First, SECURE the perimeter by sealing and bonding the seams, edges and around perimeters. Use a heat iron with sock set at around 250F and a soft cotton glove or sock. Heat the perimeter edge in stages, just warm up a small area and then  press the warm covering down firmly with the iron sock or a soft cotton cloth to bond the perimeter of the covering to the underlying substrate. Do not overheat or the edge will pull back as the material shrinks. Always rub along seams, not across the seam. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. Avoid using more heat than required to prevent bubbles from forming beneath the covering or edges pulling back as the material shrinks. Remember you are just SECUREing the perimeter at this point. Be patient and work systematically starting with a small out of the way area first to gain experience.

AFTER SECURING the perimeter, SHRINK the interior areas to fit, using a heat gun set at around 250K. Heat about 1 square foot of area at a time, shrink the covering to fit and then rub the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to BOND the covering to the underlying substrate. Over open bays the POLYCOTE ECS will appear to first sag and then begin to tighten as you apply heat. Do this in stages and try repeatedly until the covering over the open bay is tight when cool. Don't overdo it... like may things, there is a technique to this that requies a bit of experience to develop. Go slowly one step at a time. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. DO NOT APPLY EXTENSIVE HEAT NEAR EDGES & SEAMS. Always practise on the bottom of a less noticable section first. Be patient and work systematically. You will likely only have to tighten POLYCOTE once or twice to accomodate any shrinkage of the airframe in dry hot conditions.

To prevent or at least minimize the occurence of sags do not leave your model in a closed car parked in the sun. Here is some information that may help you avoid this problem.

9.9.7.3.13. POLYCOTE ECS - Tools - For working with POLYCOTE ECS

 

VMAR - Covering - Tools - Recommended

Question: What would you recommend in the way of tools for working with Covering materials?

Answer: Here's a list of what we would suggest:

  • A pair of sharp scissors
  • An Xacto Knife with a SHARP #11 Blade
  • A Heat Iron with controllable temperature (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Iron Sock (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Gun with controllable consistent output temperature
  • A soft cotton cloth or glove.

Please note that the heat gun is particularly important. Unfortunately the standard RC covering heat gun has been driven down in price so that it is selling at times for usa$14.95-19.95. We say unfortunately because at that price we are getting exactly what we are paying for... a pretty crude unregulated heat producer. Even a decent hair dryer costs more!

Most of these low end RC covering heat guns do not monitor the heat coming out of the nozzle. They have a heating element that heats the air sucked into the back of the gun and a fan that blasts it out the front. The vanes at the back of the gun have a very limited effect on the output temperature. So... if you take a 1000 watt gun for example, and heat air that is at 50F flowing into the back of gun you get a fixed amount of temperature increase... lets say 350F and the outflowing air is at 50+350=400F. Now run the same gun with ambient air of 75F flowing into the back of the gun and the same 1000W of energy will increase this 75F air by 350 degrees to 425F. So depending on the ambient air temperature you get a different output temperature. To add to the confusion somewhat, adding a fixed amount of energy to dry air (low humidity) will change the temperature of the air more than if you add if you add the same amount of energy to moist (high humidity) air. This variation in output temperature due to changes in the ambient air and ambient humidity makes it very difficult to work out a reliable consistent technique when you are working with heat shrink covering. One day you get a "feel" for the right amount of heat, time and distance and everything goes great. The next day or a month later you try this with a different ambient air temperature and/or different humidity and your technique does not work... why? Because the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun has changed without you being aware of it.

What can you do about this to make your covering technique more consistent? Well sadly to say you either have to live with this problem or you have to dump the cheapy RC covering heat gun and get a heat gun that measures and controls the consistency of the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun.

There are a number of heat guns for shrinking heat shrink tubing that work well. They can be rather expensive but give you good control over the temperature you want AND hold that temperature consistently regardless of ambient temperature and humidity. It's nice to be able to select the temperature if you've got the cash to buy such a gun. If you need to watch your pennies a bit more carefully, we suggest opting for less control and go for consistency. Some of the lower priced heat guns intended for stripping paint do this. You will need to work out the distance and time technique that works for your covering but at least you will be doing so with a gun that is producing a reliable temperature output. We have used the Black & Decker #9756 with good results. This has two temperature settings, 500F and 1000F. Read the safety instructions that comes with the unit. Work with the 500F setting at a good distance at first (say 15") and move the gun frequently until you get a feel for it. Generally the closer you get and/or the hotter the air coming out of the gun, the quicker you have to move the gun (less exposure time) to avoid overheating the covering.

 

9.9.8. VMAR - Covering - VCOTE Information & Tips
9.9.8.1. VCOTE - What is it?

VCOTE is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada available only from VMAR.

  • With VCOTE the graphics are pre-applied to the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • VCOTE utilizes a tough heat shrinkable film and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • VCOTE is fuel proof to 15% nitro fuels and fuel resistant to higher nitro fuels provided that any raw unburned fuel is removed quickly. We recommend dabbing up any raw unburned high nitro fuel as a precaution.

By pre-applying the the graphics... we've eliminated the need for decals or overlays completely and reduced the need for maintenance to a minimum. No decal or overlay edges to pick up, and very few seams. With VCOTE you will have a great model that looks terrific right out of the box and spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

VCOTE from VMAR!

 

 

9.9.8.2. VCOTE - Care & Maintenance Tips

VCOTE FROM VMAR

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
9.9.8.2.1. VCOTE - Introduction - Care & Maintenance

 

VCOTE - What is it?

VCOTE is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada available only from VMAR.

  • With VCOTE the graphics are pre-applied to the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • VCOTE utilizes a tough heat shrinkable film and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • VCOTE is fuel proof to 15% nitro fuels and fuel resistant to higher nitro fuels provided that any raw unburned fuel is removed quickly. We recommend dabbing up any raw unburned high nitro fuel as a precaution.

By pre-applying the the graphics... we've eliminated the need for decals or overlays completely and reduced the need for maintenance to a minimum. No decal or overlay edges to pick up, and very few seams. With VCOTE you will have a great model that looks terrific right out of the box and spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

VCOTE from VMAR!

 

 

9.9.8.2.2. VCOTE - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.

 

9.9.8.2.3. VCOTE - Avoid Hot Vehicles parked in the Sun

Question: I inadvertently left my model locked in my closed van all afternoon in the hot desert sun? Will this have any effect on the VCOTE covering?

Answer: Nothing permanent but you will likely have some sagging at least the first and second time you do this. Generally not a good idea. Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions and if your model is stuck in this environment with no circulation for hours and hours, sagging is often the result.

We recommend avoiding this type of problem. Keep the model out of situations where the temperature is extreme with little or no circulation.

If it has occurred, there is no point in crying over spilt milk...  if you see sagging, don't panic! BEFORE you do anything at all, please review the Tip on Tightening VCOTE.  Sagging is fixable (a whole model can be done in less than an hour) but only if you go about it properly. If you jump into this with your heat iron and heat gun assuming you know how to do this because you've fixed Monokote sags and bubbles for years, you have a high probabilty of making a botch of this and you will be stuck with a rather unpleasant result.

 

9.9.8.2.4. VCOTE - Cleaning After Flying

Question: I have been flying my model using a glow or gasoline engine. I have some oil residue on the model along with some bug guts and a bit of dirt from a less than perfect landing. How do I clean it up?

Answer:  To clean VCOTE after flying we recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. You can use other similar cleaners but avoid cleaners with solvents or abrasives. It is a good idea to always test a small out of the way spot first. Wipe along seams, not across. To really show off your VCOTE covering, after cleaning wtih Fantastic... use a bit of Armorall and buff dry & shiny.

Please carefully review the following information and take particular note if you are planning on using Simple Green, 409 or similar non-approved cleaners.

VMAR - Cleaning Model Aircraft

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model aircraft. What should I be aware of when cleaning it after flying?

Answer: Couple of general suggestions here and a few DO NOT DO caveats. See the additional information below for more details. We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and you can dilute it 50/50 with water. Always test any cleaner on a small out of view area first. Avoid overspray on plastics. Spray cleaner lightly (do NOT flood) and wipe away cleaner and dirt/oil with disposable towels as soon as possible after spraying. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane.

Additional Information: VMAR models are covered in V-Cote, POLYCOTE ECS and VCOTE-2 3DS. All of these materials are heat shrink film. V-Cote is flatter in gloss and tolerates up to 15% nitro fuel well. Higher nitro fuel can soften V-Cote graphics if allowed to sit on the surface for extended periods of time. POLYCOTE ECS is higher in gloss. VCOTE-2 3DS has a medium gloss and has 3D indentations for some panel lines and rivets. POLYCOTE and VCOTE-2 3DS can tolerate high nitro fuels and other fuel types. Always wipe away raw fuel quickly in any event.

All of these covering materials clean well with Fantastic and many other household cleaners. We recommend Fantastic diluted 50/50 with water. Always test on a small out of view area first when working with any cleaner. Do NOT flood or over spray. Avoid spraying directly on plastic components and canopies. Wipe away cleaner and residue immediately after spraying with cleaner using disposable paper towels. 

Do NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane. Simple Green and 409 are good products for cutting grease and other industrial/commercial type applications but they are intended for use on non-porous materials and contain powerful chemicals that are not compatible with adhesives, balsa wood and other material found in a model aircraft. Use a web search engine to search on Simple Green and/or 409 and note the warnings and chemicals appliable to these and similar products. Do NOT NOT NOT use other cleaners having similar chemicals to those found in Simple Green or 409.

Here is a link to information related to 409: http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~jsmith/MSDS/FORMULA%20409%20CLEANER.htm

What can SIMPLE GREEN, 409 and similar cleaners do to your model? Well... it depends. If you are not concerned about the safety aspects of these products and spray these materials on a paper towel and then use the damp towel to wipe down your model (avoid plastics) these products seem to do a good job of cutting grease and cleaning the model and many modelers like these cleaners. However, if you spray the material on to the model rather than the towel, you run the risk of the cleaner running into seams, cavities, hinge slots, covering joints and onto plastic components etc. These type of cleaners are intended for non-porous materials and if they wick or run into adhesive joints, hinge slots or under covering they can loosen the covering (this has been going on for years and modelers sometimes fight back with CA on the joint) AND react with some adhesives to soften and weaken the bond. We have also seen these type of cleaners react with adhesive commonly used to glue hinges and canopies into place and leave an ugly looking dark green stain under the covering where it has wicked further into the wooden substrate. This cannot be repaired and will continue to spread if more Simple Green, 409 or similar cleaner finds its way into the same area. We have also seen these type of cleaners attack plastic... generally the plastic does not dissolve or soften, instead it gets dry, hard, brittle and will over time crack and flake off.

In summary it would be best to use the cleaner and the techniques we recommend. If you are fond of your particular cleaner then at least make sure you follow the techniques we have outlined above. Test first. Do not flood or overspray. Wipe away quickly. Best to spray on the towel rather than the model. Make sure no cleaner can get into the model substrate such as the balsa or plywood materials... stay away from hinge slots, seams, cavities, joints, adhesive bonds etc. Protect plastics from direct contact with cleaners and/or long term exposure to cleaners.

Related Articles:

For each type of covering we use, there may be additional articles related to cleaning that particular covering. To check for Related Articles please use the Search tool near the top left of the Knowledge Base window and search on the word "Clean". Type just the letters Clean (clean) into the search box and then click on the button marked Search. The search tool will return a list of articles having "Clean" in the header or body. We suggest reviewing the articles related to the covering on your particular model.

 

9.9.8.2.5. VCOTE - Cleaning Initially

Question: I have my model all assembled and have a few streaks or other residue on the VCOTE covering. How do I clean these off.

Answer:  VCOTE has very few seams and we use our SURE SEAL system to really lock the seams down. Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the covering when looked at under bright light this is a residue from the SURE SEAL process. Use alcohol with a paper towel and wipe the residue away. VCOTE and the graphics detailing are resistant to alcohol but it is always a good idea to test alcohol or any other cleaner or solvent you are using on a small out of the way area first! Change towels frequently. If you want to accentuate the gloss of VCOTE even more, use a bit of Armorall and buff shiny with a clean paper towel. Test the Armoral on a small out of the way area first! Discard all soiled paper towels into a metal garbage can stored outdoors.

 

9.9.8.2.6. VCOTE - How to Cut.

Question: VCOTE is tough stuff! How do I cut it?

Answer: VCOTE is made from a thermally reactive film. Where possible, use scissors to cut VCOTE. Scissors work well. Otherwise use a new sharp #11 Blade. The blade must be SHARP.

 

9.9.8.2.7. VCOTE - Protecting the Finish - What should I do?

Question: I've been flying my VMAR model for a while and it looks great. Is there anything that I need to do protect the finish to ensure it lasts.

Answer: VCOTE is pretty tough stuff and does not need kid glove handling. If you do the following you should get good durability for the life of the model.

  • Most Importantly - Follow the Cleaning instructions. Use the recommended Cleaners and Method.
  • Secondly, Avoid getting raw fuel higher than 15% on the model. Remove any raw fuel from the finish as soon as possible. Dab it off gently and then clean with Fantastic.
  • Test anything you apply to any covering, plastic or component. It's a good idea to assume that whatever is made there is something that can attack it. Test any glue, paint, cleaner, sealer, wax or anything else you may feel inclined to try on your model by applying the material to a small out of the way area first. If you get a reaction, a small blemish is better than having your canopy curl up or the covering turn black overnight. We've run into some very strang situations over the years... 99.9% of these would have been avoided by testing first.
  • Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun. UV light can play hell with pigments especially dark colors and flourescents. This does not mean you need to go around covering your model every 15 minutes but if you can get it out of the sun after a few hours we would suggest that's a good way to go.
  • Patch holes and tack down any loose seams as soon as possible after the problem is noticed.

That's about it. Nothing to really sweat over... basically common sense.

 

9.9.8.2.8. VCOTE - Removing & Using Tape

Question: Some of my control surfaces have arrived from the factory with tape holding them in place during shipment. Is there a correct method for removing the tape.

Answer: When removing tape from VCOTE (or any covering for that matter), peal the tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering. If the tape is near or across a seam or an edge, peal towards the edge or seam. Do NOT pull the tape up at right angles to the covering or away from a seam or edge.

If you use your own tape during the assembly process, use a low tack masking tape and remove it using the procedure noted above.

 

9.9.8.2.9. VCOTE - Repairing Punctures - How to Patch.

Question: I have a puncture in my VCOTE.  How do I patch this?

Answer:  If you puncture VCOTE, thoroughly clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. We clean using Fantastic and a paper towel. Once you have all the oil residue removed, wipe the area again with a fresh clean towel moistened with water or plain alcohol. The patch should be 1/2" (13 mm) bigger than the hole on all sides.

It may be difficult to match colors or patterns. When you run into this challenge, you might want to take a different approach. Rather than try to match the color or pattern, deliberately use a black white or silver patch and cut it into the shape of a panel hatch. Detail this with lettering and a perimeter line and it will look like the hatch is supposed to be there. Another trick is to cut the patch into a shape of a letter, flag or aircraft marking.

We recommend using after market VCOTE patch material. You can also use polyester covering such as POLYCOTE, ULTRACOTE or ORACOVER. Monokote or SolarFilm covering material will also work. Cut the patch with rounded corners. Seal the patch in place with a heat iron with sock set at 225F first and then tighten the patch and the original covering around the patch using a heat gun as outlined in the tightening section above. To repair larger more extensive damage areas, you may wish to obtain the appropriate VCOTE covering set for this model.

 

9.9.8.2.10. VCOTE - Seam Loose - How to Reseal.

Question: One of the seams on my model has come loose. What have I done wrong? What should I do to reseal it?

Answer: Although we are very careful to tack all seams down and then to seal them as well, we are not perfect (although we're trying!) so the loosening of a seam may not be due to anything you are doing. Once a seam is in place properly we advise being very careful when cleaning the model to avoid wiping across the seam... wipe parallel to it. There are very few seams on VMAR models.

Generally seams are located at:

  • The trailing edge of the wing (hidden by the aileron),
  • The leading edge of the wing if swept or tapered,
  • The leading and trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer,
  • 1 or more seams on the bottom of the fuselage,
  • Some models with shaped turtle decks may have a seam at the top of the fuselage running more or less along the spine.

If you do have a loose edge, clean any oil residue from the area and the edge and reseal with thin CA.

 

9.9.8.2.11. VCOTE - How to Tighten Sags

Question: My model is covered with VCOTE and I have noticed that there are some sags in the covering. What is causing this? Can I fix it? What should I do?

Answer: It helps to understand how the sags develop before we get into tightening things up to get rid of the sags.

In low humidity air such as is found in the hot desert areas or in continental winter conditions where cold outside air is brought inside and heated to 22C ( 70F), the underlying structure is drying and shrinking. Many modelers feel that the sags are caused by heat and to a point they are correct because hot conditions are often dry and most definitely heat is the key to solving the problem. However, the real underlying cause is low humidity air drying the structure out and as the structure drys it gets lighter and smaller. VCOTE will not shrink at normal room temperatures and you end up with,  in effect,  more covering on your model than you need!

The way to get rid of the sags is to shrink the VCOTE with a heat gun and rub it down into the substrate with a soft cloth once it has shrunk. Before you start firing up your flame thrower, please note the following procedure... if you get the method down pat, you will get a good result and not have to do this more than 1-2 times... 3 times at most. However if you assume that VCOTE is like Monokote or SolarFilm, you will make a hash of it and you will not be happy with the outcome. VCOTE is a thermal shrink film  and the technique for shinking it is similar to that used for ORACOVER (ULTRACOTE) without the use of a heat iron.

Remember SSB! As in 

SECURE the perimeter.

SHRINK to fit

BOND to the structure.

To tighten VCOTE, use a heat gun only. Do not use a heat iron. First, SECURE the perimeter by sealing and bonding the seams, edges and around perimeters. Use a heat gun set at around 225F and a soft cotton cloth or glove. Heat the perimeter edge in stages, just warm up a small area and then  press the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to bond the perimeter of the covering to the underlying substrate. Do not overheat or the edge will pull back as the material shrinks. Always rub along seams, not across the seam. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. Avoid using more heat than required to prevent bubbles from forming beneath the covering or edges pulling back as the material shrinks. Remember you are just SECUREing the perimeter at this point. Be patient and work systematically starting with a small out of the way area first to gain experience.

AFTER SECURING the perimeter, SHRINK the interior areas to fit, using a heat gun set at around 225K. Heat about 1 square foot of area at a time, shrink the covering to fit and then rub the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to BOND the covering to the underlying substrate. Over open bays heat the VCOTE until it is warm and sags slightly then remove the heat and the VCOTE will shrink tight over the open bay. Try this repeatedly until the covering over the open bay is tight. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. DO NOT APPLY EXTENSIVE HEAT NEAR EDGES & SEAMS. Always practise on the bottom of a less noticable section first. Be patient and work systematically. You will likely only have to tighten VCOTE once or twice to accomodate any shrinkage of the airframe in dry hot conditions.

To prevent or at least minimize the occurence of sags do not leave your model in a closed car parked in the sun. Here is some information that may help you avoid this problem.

9.9.8.2.12. VCOTE - Tools - For working with VCOTE

 

VMAR - Covering - Tools - Recommended

Question: What would you recommend in the way of tools for working with Covering materials?

Answer: Here's a list of what we would suggest:

  • A pair of sharp scissors
  • An Xacto Knife with a SHARP #11 Blade
  • A Heat Iron with controllable temperature (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Iron Sock (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Gun with controllable consistent output temperature
  • A soft cotton cloth or glove.

Please note that the heat gun is particularly important. Unfortunately the standard RC covering heat gun has been driven down in price so that it is selling at times for usa$14.95-19.95. We say unfortunately because at that price we are getting exactly what we are paying for... a pretty crude unregulated heat producer. Even a decent hair dryer costs more!

Most of these low end RC covering heat guns do not monitor the heat coming out of the nozzle. They have a heating element that heats the air sucked into the back of the gun and a fan that blasts it out the front. The vanes at the back of the gun have a very limited effect on the output temperature. So... if you take a 1000 watt gun for example, and heat air that is at 50F flowing into the back of gun you get a fixed amount of temperature increase... lets say 350F and the outflowing air is at 50+350=400F. Now run the same gun with ambient air of 75F flowing into the back of the gun and the same 1000W of energy will increase this 75F air by 350 degrees to 425F. So depending on the ambient air temperature you get a different output temperature. To add to the confusion somewhat, adding a fixed amount of energy to dry air (low humidity) will change the temperature of the air more than if you add if you add the same amount of energy to moist (high humidity) air. This variation in output temperature due to changes in the ambient air and ambient humidity makes it very difficult to work out a reliable consistent technique when you are working with heat shrink covering. One day you get a "feel" for the right amount of heat, time and distance and everything goes great. The next day or a month later you try this with a different ambient air temperature and/or different humidity and your technique does not work... why? Because the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun has changed without you being aware of it.

What can you do about this to make your covering technique more consistent? Well sadly to say you either have to live with this problem or you have to dump the cheapy RC covering heat gun and get a heat gun that measures and controls the consistency of the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun.

There are a number of heat guns for shrinking heat shrink tubing that work well. They can be rather expensive but give you good control over the temperature you want AND hold that temperature consistently regardless of ambient temperature and humidity. It's nice to be able to select the temperature if you've got the cash to buy such a gun. If you need to watch your pennies a bit more carefully, we suggest opting for less control and go for consistency. Some of the lower priced heat guns intended for stripping paint do this. You will need to work out the distance and time technique that works for your covering but at least you will be doing so with a gun that is producing a reliable temperature output. We have used the Black & Decker #9756 with good results. This has two temperature settings, 500F and 1000F. Read the safety instructions that comes with the unit. Work with the 500F setting at a good distance at first (say 15") and move the gun frequently until you get a feel for it. Generally the closer you get and/or the hotter the air coming out of the gun, the quicker you have to move the gun (less exposure time) to avoid overheating the covering.

 

9.9.9. VMAR - Covering - VCOTE2-3DS Information & Tips
9.9.9.1. VCOTE2-3DS - What is it?

VCOTE2-3DS is a proprietary 3D Detailing System engineered in Canada and used on our premium VMAR ARF models where scale detailing and a tough long lasting covering is essential! Rivets and some of the hatches and panel lines are actually 3D. They stand up on the surface skin like the real thing!

VCOTE2-3DS is totally different and simply the best covering and detailing system available. VCOTE2-3DS builds on our VCOTE technology and goes a lot farther. All the detailing is inside the covering... no decals, no strips, no stripes and totally fuel proof.

Best of all... VCOTE2-3DS is very very sag resistant. Extensively tested in direct sunlight and heated air up to 130F!

  • With VCOTE2-3DS the graphics are pre-applied to the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • VCOTE2-3DS utilizes a tough heat shrinkable film and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • VCOTE2-3DS is fuel proof. We recommend dabing up any raw unburned high nitro fuel as a precaution.

By pre-applying the the graphics... we've eliminated the need for decals or overlays completely and reduced the need for maintenance to a minimum. No decal or overlay edges to pick up, and very few seams. With VCOTE2-3DS you will have a great model that looks terrific right out of the box and spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

VCOTE2-3DS 3D Detailing System - Only from VMAR!

 

9.9.9.2. VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance Tips

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
9.9.9.2.1. VCOTE2-3DS - Introduction - Care & Maintenance

 

VCOTE2-3DS - What is it?

VCOTE2-3DS is a proprietary 3D Detailing System engineered in Canada and used on our premium VMAR ARF models where scale detailing and a tough long lasting covering is essential! Rivets and some of the hatches and panel lines are actually 3D. They stand up on the surface skin like the real thing!

VCOTE2-3DS is totally different and simply the best covering and detailing system available. VCOTE2-3DS builds on our VCOTE technology and goes a lot farther. All the detailing is inside the covering... no decals, no strips, no stripes and totally fuel proof.

Best of all... VCOTE2-3DS is very very sag resistant. Extensively tested in direct sunlight and heated air up to 130F!

  • With VCOTE2-3DS the graphics are pre-applied to the covering... not stuck on top. No Decals! No Layers! No Strips! No Stripes!
  • VCOTE2-3DS utilizes a tough heat shrinkable film and our SURE SEAL system to ensure that the seams stay down!
  • VCOTE2-3DS is fuel proof. We recommend dabing up any raw unburned high nitro fuel as a precaution.

By pre-applying the the graphics... we've eliminated the need for decals or overlays completely and reduced the need for maintenance to a minimum. No decal or overlay edges to pick up, and very few seams. With VCOTE2-3DS you will have a great model that looks terrific right out of the box and spend more time flying and less time applying and reworking the covering!

VCOTE2-3DS 3D Detailing System - Only from VMAR!

 

9.9.9.2.2. VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE2 - 3DS is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE2 - 3DS is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE2 - 3DS, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE2 - 3DS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE2 - 3DS, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13 bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE2 - 3DS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.  

 

9.9.9.2.3. VCOTE2-3DS - Avoid Hot Vehicles parked in the Sun

Question: I inadvertently left my model locked in my closed van all afternoon in the hot desert sun? Will this have any effect on the VCOTE2-3DS covering?

Answer: Nothing permanent but you will likely have some sagging at least the first and second time you do this. Generally not a good idea. Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions and if your model is stuck in this environment with no circulation for hours and hours, sagging is often the result.

We recommend avoiding this type of problem. Keep the model out of situations where the temperature is extreme with little or no circulation.

If it has occurred, there is no point in crying over spilt milk...  if you see sagging, don't panic! BEFORE you do anything at all, please review the Tip on Tightening VCOTE2-3DS.  Sagging is fixable (a whole model can be done in less than an hour) but only if you go about it properly. If you jump into this with your heat iron and heat gun assuming you know how to do this because you've fixed Monokote sags and bubbles for years, you have a high probabilty of making a botch of this and you will be stuck with a rather unpleasant result.

 

VCOTE - How to Tighten Sags

Question: My model is covered with VCOTE and I have noticed that there are some sags in the covering. What is causing this? Can I fix it? What should I do?

Answer: It helps to understand how the sags develop before we get into tightening things up to get rid of the sags.

In low humidity air such as is found in the hot desert areas or in continental winter conditions where cold outside air is brought inside and heated to 22C ( 70F), the underlying structure is drying and shrinking. Many modelers feel that the sags are caused by heat and to a point they are correct because hot conditions are often dry and most definitely heat is the key to solving the problem. However, the real underlying cause is low humidity air drying the structure out and as the structure drys it gets lighter and smaller. VCOTE will not shrink at normal room temperatures and you end up with,  in effect,  more covering on your model than you need!

The way to get rid of the sags is to shrink the VCOTE with a heat gun and rub it down into the substrate with a soft cloth once it has shrunk. Before you start firing up your flame thrower, please note the following procedure... if you get the method down pat, you will get a good result and not have to do this more than 1-2 times... 3 times at most. However if you assume that VCOTE is like Monokote or SolarFilm, you will make a hash of it and you will not be happy with the outcome. VCOTE is a thermal shrink film  and the technique for shinking it is similar to that used for ORACOVER (ULTRACOTE) without the use of a heat iron.

Remember SSB! As in 

SECURE the perimeter.

SHRINK to fit

BOND to the structure.

To tighten VCOTE, use a heat gun only. Do not use a heat iron. First, SECURE the perimeter by sealing and bonding the seams, edges and around perimeters. Use a heat gun set at around 225F and a soft cotton cloth or glove. Heat the perimeter edge in stages, just warm up a small area and then  press the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to bond the perimeter of the covering to the underlying substrate. Do not overheat or the edge will pull back as the material shrinks. Always rub along seams, not across the seam. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. Avoid using more heat than required to prevent bubbles from forming beneath the covering or edges pulling back as the material shrinks. Remember you are just SECUREing the perimeter at this point. Be patient and work systematically starting with a small out of the way area first to gain experience.

AFTER SECURING the perimeter, SHRINK the interior areas to fit, using a heat gun set at around 225K. Heat about 1 square foot of area at a time, shrink the covering to fit and then rub the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to BOND the covering to the underlying substrate. Over open bays heat the VCOTE until it is warm and sags slightly then remove the heat and the VCOTE will shrink tight over the open bay. Try this repeatedly until the covering over the open bay is tight. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. DO NOT APPLY EXTENSIVE HEAT NEAR EDGES & SEAMS. Always practise on the bottom of a less noticable section first. Be patient and work systematically. You will likely only have to tighten VCOTE once or twice to accomodate any shrinkage of the airframe in dry hot conditions.

To prevent or at least minimize the occurence of sags do not leave your model in a closed car parked in the sun. Here is some information that may help you avoid this problem.

9.9.9.2.4. VCOTE2-3DS - Cleaning After Flying

Question: I have been flying my model using a glow or gasoline engine. I have some oil residue on the model along with some bug guts and a bit of dirt from a less than perfect landing. How do I clean it up?

Answer:  To clean VCOTE2-3DS after flying we recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. You can use other similar cleaners but avoid cleaners with solvents or abrasives. It is a good idea to always test a small out of the way spot first. Wipe along seams, not across. To really show off your VCOTE2-3DS covering, after cleaning wtih Fantastic... use a bit of Armorall and buff dry & shiny.

Please carefully review the following information and take particular note if you are planning on using Simple Green, 409 or similar non-approved cleaners.

VMAR - Cleaning Model Aircraft

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model aircraft. What should I be aware of when cleaning it after flying?

Answer: Couple of general suggestions here and a few DO NOT DO caveats. See the additional information below for more details. We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and you can dilute it 50/50 with water. Always test any cleaner on a small out of view area first. Avoid overspray on plastics. Spray cleaner lightly (do NOT flood) and wipe away cleaner and dirt/oil with disposable towels as soon as possible after spraying. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane.

Additional Information: VMAR models are covered in V-Cote, POLYCOTE ECS and VCOTE-2 3DS. All of these materials are heat shrink film. V-Cote is flatter in gloss and tolerates up to 15% nitro fuel well. Higher nitro fuel can soften V-Cote graphics if allowed to sit on the surface for extended periods of time. POLYCOTE ECS is higher in gloss. VCOTE-2 3DS has a medium gloss and has 3D indentations for some panel lines and rivets. POLYCOTE and VCOTE-2 3DS can tolerate high nitro fuels and other fuel types. Always wipe away raw fuel quickly in any event.

All of these covering materials clean well with Fantastic and many other household cleaners. We recommend Fantastic diluted 50/50 with water. Always test on a small out of view area first when working with any cleaner. Do NOT flood or over spray. Avoid spraying directly on plastic components and canopies. Wipe away cleaner and residue immediately after spraying with cleaner using disposable paper towels. 

Do NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials to clean a model airplane. Simple Green and 409 are good products for cutting grease and other industrial/commercial type applications but they are intended for use on non-porous materials and contain powerful chemicals that are not compatible with adhesives, balsa wood and other material found in a model aircraft. Use a web search engine to search on Simple Green and/or 409 and note the warnings and chemicals appliable to these and similar products. Do NOT NOT NOT use other cleaners having similar chemicals to those found in Simple Green or 409.

Here is a link to information related to 409: http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~jsmith/MSDS/FORMULA%20409%20CLEANER.htm

What can SIMPLE GREEN, 409 and similar cleaners do to your model? Well... it depends. If you are not concerned about the safety aspects of these products and spray these materials on a paper towel and then use the damp towel to wipe down your model (avoid plastics) these products seem to do a good job of cutting grease and cleaning the model and many modelers like these cleaners. However, if you spray the material on to the model rather than the towel, you run the risk of the cleaner running into seams, cavities, hinge slots, covering joints and onto plastic components etc. These type of cleaners are intended for non-porous materials and if they wick or run into adhesive joints, hinge slots or under covering they can loosen the covering (this has been going on for years and modelers sometimes fight back with CA on the joint) AND react with some adhesives to soften and weaken the bond. We have also seen these type of cleaners react with adhesive commonly used to glue hinges and canopies into place and leave an ugly looking dark green stain under the covering where it has wicked further into the wooden substrate. This cannot be repaired and will continue to spread if more Simple Green, 409 or similar cleaner finds its way into the same area. We have also seen these type of cleaners attack plastic... generally the plastic does not dissolve or soften, instead it gets dry, hard, brittle and will over time crack and flake off.

In summary it would be best to use the cleaner and the techniques we recommend. If you are fond of your particular cleaner then at least make sure you follow the techniques we have outlined above. Test first. Do not flood or overspray. Wipe away quickly. Best to spray on the towel rather than the model. Make sure no cleaner can get into the model substrate such as the balsa or plywood materials... stay away from hinge slots, seams, cavities, joints, adhesive bonds etc. Protect plastics from direct contact with cleaners and/or long term exposure to cleaners.

Related Articles:

For each type of covering we use, there may be additional articles related to cleaning that particular covering. To check for Related Articles please use the Search tool near the top left of the Knowledge Base window and search on the word "Clean". Type just the letters Clean (clean) into the search box and then click on the button marked Search. The search tool will return a list of articles having "Clean" in the header or body. We suggest reviewing the articles related to the covering on your particular model.

 

9.9.9.2.5. VCOTE2-3DS - Cleaning Initially

Question: I have my model all assembled and have a few streaks or other residue on the VCOTE2-3DS covering. How do I clean these off.

Answer:  VCOTE2-3DS has very few seams and we use our SURE SEAL system to really lock the seams down. Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the covering when looked at under bright light this is a residue from the SURE SEAL process. Use alcohol with a paper towel and wipe the residue away. VCOTE2-3DS and the graphics detailing are resistant to alcohol but it is always a good idea to test alcohol or any other cleaner or solvent you are using on a small out of the way area first! Change towels frequently. If you want to accentuate the gloss of VCOTE2-3DS even more, use a bit of Armorall and buff shiny with a clean paper towel. Test the Armoral on a small out of the way area first! Discard all soiled paper towels into a metal garbage can stored outdoors.

 

9.9.9.2.6. VCOTE2-3DS - How to Cut.

Question: VCOTE203DS is tough stuff! How do I cut it?

Answer: VCOTE2-3DS is made from a thermally reactive film. Where possible, use scissors to cut VCOTE2-3DS. Scissors work well. Otherwise use a new sharp #11 Blade. The blade must be SHARP.

 

9.9.9.2.7. VCOTE2-3DS - Protecting the Finish - What should I do?

Question: I've been flying my VMAR model for a while and it looks great. Is there anything that I need to do protect the finish to ensure it lasts.

Answer: VCOTE2-3DS is pretty tough stuff and does not need kid glove handling. If you do the following you should get good durability for the life of the model.

  • Most Importantly - Follow the Cleaning instructions. Use the recommended Cleaners and Method.
  • Secondly, remove raw fuel from the finish as soon as possible. Dab it off gently and then clean with Fantastic.
  • Test anything you apply to any covering, plastic or component. It's a good idea to assume that whatever is made there is something that can attack it. Test any glue, paint, cleaner, sealer, wax or anything else you may feel inclined to try on your model by applying the material to a small out of the way area first. If you get a reaction, a small blemish is better than having your canopy curl up or the covering turn black overnight. We've run into some very strange situations over the years... 99.9% of these would have been avoided by testing first.
  • Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun. UV light can play hell with pigments especially dark colors and flourescents. This does not mean you need to go around covering your model every 15 minutes but if you can get it out of the sun after a few hours we would suggest that's a good way to go.
  • Patch holes and tack down any loose seams as soon as possible after the problem is noticed.

That's about it. Nothing to really sweat over... basically common sense.

 

9.9.9.2.8. VCOTE2-3DS - Removing & Using Tape

Question: Some of my control surfaces have arrived from the factory with tape holding them in place during shipment. Is there a correct method for removing the tape.

Answer: When removing tape from VCOTE2-3DS (or any covering for that matter), peal the tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering. If the tape is near or across a seam or an edge, peal towards the edge or seam. Do NOT pull the tape up at right angles to the covering or away from a seam or edge.

If you use your own tape during the assembly process, use a low tack masking tape and remove it using the procedure noted above.

 

9.9.9.2.9. VCOTE2-3DS - Repairing Punctures - How to Patch.

Question: I have a puncture in my VCOTE2-3DS.  How do I patch this?

Answer:  If you puncture VCOTE2-3DS, thoroughly clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. We clean using Fantastic and a paper towel. Once you have all the oil residue removed, wipe the area again with a fresh clean towel moistened with water or plain alcohol. The patch should be 1/2" (13 mm) bigger than the hole on all sides.

It may be difficult to match colors or patterns. When you run into this challenge, you might want to take a different approach. Rather than try to match the color or pattern, deliberately use a black white or silver patch and cut it into the shape of a panel hatch. Detail this with lettering and a perimeter line and it will look like the hatch is supposed to be there. Another trick is to cut the patch into a shape of a letter, flag or aircraft marking.

We recommend using after market VCOTE2-3DS patch material.You can also use polyester covering such as POLYCOTE, ULTRACOTE or ORACOVER. Monokote or SolarFilm covering material will also work. Cut the patch with rounded corners. Seal the patch in place with a heat iron and sock set at 225F first and then tighten the patch and the original covering around the patch using a heat gun as outlined in the tightening section above. To repair larger more extensive damage areas, you may wish to obtain the appropriate VCOTE2-3DS covering set for this model.

 

9.9.9.2.10. VCOTE2-3DS - Repairing Splits - How to.

Question: I appear to have a split in my VCOTE2-3DS covering.  What should I do?

Answer: VCOTE2-3DS is first painted by hand and the a final overcoat of polyurethane is applied to seal the covering and paint. 
 
If a small split has occurred in the covering substrate layer during production it will have been painted and sealed with polyurethane. No further work is required unless you can see bare wood through the split in the covering.
 
If bare wood is visible through the split in the covering, the split occurred after production, likely in shipping or thereafter. Thoroughly clean any oil residue from the area of the split. We clean using Fantastic and a paper towel. Once you have all the oil residue removed, wipe the area again with a fresh clean towel moistened with plain alcohol. Using a clean towel, press down gently on either side of the split to ensure the covering is well bonded to the wood beneath.
 
Seal the exposed wood with ZAP/CA (pink bottle, thin). Use a small amount only and allow it to wick into the wood and under the edges of the covering on either side of the split. Let the ZAP/CA cure. DO NOT ACCELERATE.
A small split that is not overly noticeable to the eye is probably not worth further effort beyond sealing the wood. If you wish to try to "hide" the split, it may be difficult to match colors or patterns. When you run into this challenge, you might want to take a different approach. Rather than try to match the color or pattern, deliberately use a black, white or silver patch and cut it into the shape of a panel hatch. Detail this with lettering and a perimeter line and it will look like the hatch is supposed to be there. Another trick is to cut the patch into a shape such as a letter, flag or aircraft marking.

We recommend using after market VCOTE2-3DS patch material.You can also use polyester covering such as POLYCOTE, ULTRACOTE or ORACOVER. Monokote or SolarFilm covering material will also work. Cut the patch about 1/2 inch (12 mm) larger than the minimum necessary and cut it with rounded corners. Seal the patch in place with a heat iron and sock set at 225F first, and then only if necessary, tighten the patch and the original covering around the patch using a heat gun as outlined in a related article about tightening. Be cautious with the amount of heat that you apply, you do not want to end up turning a small problem into a larger one! To repair larger more extensive damage areas, you may wish to obtain the appropriate VCOTE2-3DS covering set for your model.

 

9.9.9.2.11. VCOTE2-3DS - Seam Loose - How to Reseal.

Question: One of the seams on my model has come loose. What have I done wrong? What should I do to reseal it?

Answer: Although we are very careful to tack all seams down and then to seal them as well, we are not perfect (although we're trying!) so the loosening of a seam may not be due to anything you are doing. Once a seam is in place properly we advise being very careful when cleaning the model to avoid wiping across the seam... wipe parallel to it. There are very few seams on VMAR models.

Generally seams are located at:

  • The trailing edge of the wing (hidden by the aileron),
  • The leading edge of the wing if swept or tapered,
  • The leading and trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer,
  • 1 or more seams on the bottom of the fuselage,
  • Some models with shaped turtle decks may have a seam at the top of the fuselage running more or less along the spine.

If you do have a loose edge, clean any oil residue from the area and the edge and reseal with thin CA.

 

9.9.9.2.12. VCOTE2-3DS - How to Tighten Sags

Question: My model is covered with VCOTE2-3DS and I have noticed that there are some sags in the covering. What is causing this? Can I fix it? What should I do?

Answer: It helps to understand how the sags develop before we get into tightening things up to get rid of the sags.

In low humidity air such as is found in the hot desert areas or in continental winter conditions where cold outside air is brought inside and heated to 22C ( 70F), the underlying structure is drying and shrinking. Many modelers feel that the sags are caused by heat and to a point they are correct because hot conditions are often dry and most definitely heat is the key to solving the problem. However, the real underlying cause is low humidity air drying the structure out and as the structure drys it gets lighter and smaller. VCOTE2-3DS will not shrink at normal room temperatures and you end up with,  in effect,  more covering on your model than you need!

The way to get rid of the sags is to shrink the VCOTE2-3DS with a heat gun and rub it down into the substrate with a soft cloth once it has shrunk. Before you start firing up your flame thrower, please note the following procedure... if you get the method down pat, you will get a good result and not have to do this more than 1-2 times... 3 times at most. However if you assume that VCOTE2-3DS is like Monokote or SolarFilm, you will make a hash of it and you will not be happy with the outcome. VCOTE2-3DS is a thermal shrink film  and the technique for shinking it is similar to that used for ORACOVER (ULTRACOTE) without the use of a heat iron.

Remember SSB! As in 

SECURE the perimeter.

SHRINK to fit

BOND to the structure.

To tighten VCOTE2-3DS, use a heat gun only. Do not use a heat iron. First, SECURE the perimeter by sealing and bonding the seams, edges and around perimeters. Use a heat gun set at around 225F and a soft cotton cloth or glove. Heat the perimeter edge in stages, just warm up a small area and then  press the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to bond the perimeter of the covering to the underlying substrate. Do not overheat or the edge will pull back as the material shrinks. Always rub along seams, not across the seam. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. Avoid using more heat than required to prevent bubbles from forming beneath the covering or edges pulling back as the material shrinks. Remember you are just SECUREing the perimeter at this point. Be patient and work systematically starting with a small out of the way area first to gain experience.

AFTER SECURING the perimeter, SHRINK the interior areas to fit, using a heat gun set at around 225K. Heat about 1 square foot of area at a time, shrink the covering to fit and then rub the warm covering down firmly with a soft cotton cloth to BOND the covering to the underlying substrate. Over open bays heat the VCOTE2-3DS until it is warm and sags slightly then remove the heat and the VCOTE2-3DS will shrink tight over the open bay. Try this repeatedly until the covering over the open bay is tight. Higher temperatures may assist with complex curved surfaces. DO NOT APPLY EXTENSIVE HEAT NEAR EDGES & SEAMS. Always practise on the bottom of a less noticable section first. Be patient and work systematically. You will likely only have to tighten VCOTE2-3DS once or twice to accomodate any shrinkage of the airframe in dry hot conditions.

To prevent or at least minimize the occurence of sags do not leave your model in a closed car parked in the sun. Here is some information that may help you avoid this problem.

VCOTE2-3DS - Avoid Hot Vehicles parked in the Sun

Question: I inadvertently left my model locked in my closed van all afternoon in the hot desert sun? Will this have any effect on the VCOTE2-3DS covering?

Answer: Nothing permanent but you will likely have some sagging at least the first and second time you do this. Generally not a good idea. Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions and if your model is stuck in this environment with no circulation for hours and hours, sagging is often the result.

We recommend avoiding this type of problem. Keep the model out of situations where the temperature is extreme with little or no circulation.

If it has occurred, there is no point in crying over spilt milk...  if you see sagging, don't panic! BEFORE you do anything at all, please review the Tip on Tightening VCOTE2-3DS.  Sagging is fixable (a whole model can be done in less than an hour) but only if you go about it properly. If you jump into this with your heat iron and heat gun assuming you know how to do this because you've fixed Monokote sags and bubbles for years, you have a high probabilty of making a botch of this and you will be stuck with a rather unpleasant result.

 

9.9.9.2.13. VCOTE2-3DS - Tools - For working with VCOTE2-3DS

 

VMAR - Covering - Tools - Recommended

Question: What would you recommend in the way of tools for working with Covering materials?

Answer: Here's a list of what we would suggest:

  • A pair of sharp scissors
  • An Xacto Knife with a SHARP #11 Blade
  • A Heat Iron with controllable temperature (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Iron Sock (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Gun with controllable consistent output temperature
  • A soft cotton cloth or glove.

Please note that the heat gun is particularly important. Unfortunately the standard RC covering heat gun has been driven down in price so that it is selling at times for usa$14.95-19.95. We say unfortunately because at that price we are getting exactly what we are paying for... a pretty crude unregulated heat producer. Even a decent hair dryer costs more!

Most of these low end RC covering heat guns do not monitor the heat coming out of the nozzle. They have a heating element that heats the air sucked into the back of the gun and a fan that blasts it out the front. The vanes at the back of the gun have a very limited effect on the output temperature. So... if you take a 1000 watt gun for example, and heat air that is at 50F flowing into the back of gun you get a fixed amount of temperature increase... lets say 350F and the outflowing air is at 50+350=400F. Now run the same gun with ambient air of 75F flowing into the back of the gun and the same 1000W of energy will increase this 75F air by 350 degrees to 425F. So depending on the ambient air temperature you get a different output temperature. To add to the confusion somewhat, adding a fixed amount of energy to dry air (low humidity) will change the temperature of the air more than if you add if you add the same amount of energy to moist (high humidity) air. This variation in output temperature due to changes in the ambient air and ambient humidity makes it very difficult to work out a reliable consistent technique when you are working with heat shrink covering. One day you get a "feel" for the right amount of heat, time and distance and everything goes great. The next day or a month later you try this with a different ambient air temperature and/or different humidity and your technique does not work... why? Because the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun has changed without you being aware of it.

What can you do about this to make your covering technique more consistent? Well sadly to say you either have to live with this problem or you have to dump the cheapy RC covering heat gun and get a heat gun that measures and controls the consistency of the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun.

There are a number of heat guns for shrinking heat shrink tubing that work well. They can be rather expensive but give you good control over the temperature you want AND hold that temperature consistently regardless of ambient temperature and humidity. It's nice to be able to select the temperature if you've got the cash to buy such a gun. If you need to watch your pennies a bit more carefully, we suggest opting for less control and go for consistency. Some of the lower priced heat guns intended for stripping paint do this. You will need to work out the distance and time technique that works for your covering but at least you will be doing so with a gun that is producing a reliable temperature output. We have used the Black & Decker #9756 with good results. This has two temperature settings, 500F and 1000F. Read the safety instructions that comes with the unit. Work with the 500F setting at a good distance at first (say 15") and move the gun frequently until you get a feel for it. Generally the closer you get and/or the hotter the air coming out of the gun, the quicker you have to move the gun (less exposure time) to avoid overheating the covering.

 

9.9.9.3. VCOTE2-3DS - Painting Tips

Question: I want to add some additional graphics to my VMAR ARF model using paint. The model I have is covered in VCOTE2 - 3DS. Can you give me any tips on painting VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we can. Here are some tips:

  1. Please thoroughly review  the articles included below.
  2. Resolve any issues related to punctures, sags, seams etc BEFORE painting. The material to be painted must be tight, secure, clean and in a good state of repair before applying any paint.
  3. After carefully maintaining & cleaning the material to be painted, select a small out of sight area to test. Do NOT assume that your paint is compatible with any covering material, plastic or component without testing first.
  4. If the paint is to be applied to plastic or covering, use fine steel wool or very very fine wet/dry sandpaper (400+ grit) to buff out the gloss from the factory finish on the test area. All paints will stick better if the underlying surface has been cleaned and "de-glossed". Remember this is a test, do not work with a large area until you test first!
  5. Vaccuum or use a clean tack cloth to remove any sanding dust from the test area.
  6. We suggest trying a PolyUrethane based spray paint. Follow the paint instructions, cautions & warnings. Pay particular attention to health warnings, hazards & requirements for ventilation. Unless the paint instructions specifically state otherwise, work in a dry area at room temperature and build up the paint layer slowly. Do not flood. Mist a partial first coat onto the test area, let it set up according to the instructions on the can and then build up the first coat so that it is more or less opaque (solid). If you cannot get an opaque first coat without flooding, stop and plan on applying a second coat later.  
  7. Please note that most paints specifically state how they should be applied and how long to wait before attempting to apply a second or third coat.
  8. As you are applying the first coat and for at least 24 hours after applying the first coat, watch the paint and underlying material for any adverse reaction. If the paint or the underlying material bubbles, blisters, wrinkles, sags or otherwise reacts adversely, stop applying paint immediately. Remember the purpose of testing a small area is to work out the technique AND to avoid inducing damage to your model. If the test is a failure, do not continue!
  9. If the testing produces a good result, after 24 hours, test for adhesion of the paint to the underlying material (substrate). A good test is to use low tack masking tape pulled back upon itself. If the paint has not adhered well to the substrate, you will likely have to choose a different paint type or method. Primers and etches may be needed. Further research and testing will be required.
  10. Test that the paint stands up OK to your type of fuel and your cleaning solution.
  11. Provided that all your testing turns out successfully, you can then move forward with painting the area you have in mind. Always avoid flooding and always stop painting if you detect any adverse reactions.
  12. Following the application of your paint layers, you may wish to overspray the new paint with a clear protective layer of similar paint type to help seal and protect the color coat. Again, review the instructions that come with the paint re applying second and subsequent coats. Test Test Test before going hog wild!

 

9.9.9.4. VCOTE2-3DS - Rivets (3D) - Are they Fuel Proof?
Question: My model is covered with VCOTE2-3DS. The 3D rivets are very authentic looking! Some of the rivet indentations appear to have punctured the covering all the way through leaving a very small hole at the center of their base. Should I be concerned about this? How about fuel proofing?

Answer:
Some of the 3D rivet indentations may have a very small hole in their center. These are then sealed with a small drop of CA at the factory before the entire model is factory overcoated with a clear coat sealer.
 
If you wish to be doubly sure about fuel proofing, for example in an area that is directly exposed to raw or burned fuel during operation, take a bottle of ZAP/CA with a microdropper tube and apply a drop of CA to any small holes that appear in the base of the 3D Rivets. This will apply yet another clear barrier and help to further ensure fuel proofing.
 
 
VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE2 - 3DS is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE2 - 3DS is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE2 - 3DS, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE2 - 3DS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE2 - 3DS, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13 bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE2 - 3DS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.  

 

9.9.10. VMAR - Covering - Tools - Recommended

Question: What would you recommend in the way of tools for working with Covering materials?

Answer: Here's a list of what we would suggest:

  • A pair of sharp scissors
  • An Xacto Knife with a SHARP #11 Blade
  • A Heat Iron with controllable temperature (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Iron Sock (on VCOTE or VCOTE2-3DS use only for applying patches)
  • A Heat Gun with controllable consistent output temperature
  • A soft cotton cloth or glove.

Please note that the heat gun is particularly important. Unfortunately the standard RC covering heat gun has been driven down in price so that it is selling at times for usa$14.95-19.95. We say unfortunately because at that price we are getting exactly what we are paying for... a pretty crude unregulated heat producer. Even a decent hair dryer costs more!

Most of these low end RC covering heat guns do not monitor the heat coming out of the nozzle. They have a heating element that heats the air sucked into the back of the gun and a fan that blasts it out the front. The vanes at the back of the gun have a very limited effect on the output temperature. So... if you take a 1000 watt gun for example, and heat air that is at 50F flowing into the back of gun you get a fixed amount of temperature increase... lets say 350F and the outflowing air is at 50+350=400F. Now run the same gun with ambient air of 75F flowing into the back of the gun and the same 1000W of energy will increase this 75F air by 350 degrees to 425F. So depending on the ambient air temperature you get a different output temperature. To add to the confusion somewhat, adding a fixed amount of energy to dry air (low humidity) will change the temperature of the air more than if you add if you add the same amount of energy to moist (high humidity) air. This variation in output temperature due to changes in the ambient air and ambient humidity makes it very difficult to work out a reliable consistent technique when you are working with heat shrink covering. One day you get a "feel" for the right amount of heat, time and distance and everything goes great. The next day or a month later you try this with a different ambient air temperature and/or different humidity and your technique does not work... why? Because the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun has changed without you being aware of it.

What can you do about this to make your covering technique more consistent? Well sadly to say you either have to live with this problem or you have to dump the cheapy RC covering heat gun and get a heat gun that measures and controls the consistency of the temperature of the air flowing out of the gun.

There are a number of heat guns for shrinking heat shrink tubing that work well. They can be rather expensive but give you good control over the temperature you want AND hold that temperature consistently regardless of ambient temperature and humidity. It's nice to be able to select the temperature if you've got the cash to buy such a gun. If you need to watch your pennies a bit more carefully, we suggest opting for less control and go for consistency. Some of the lower priced heat guns intended for stripping paint do this. You will need to work out the distance and time technique that works for your covering but at least you will be doing so with a gun that is producing a reliable temperature output. We have used the Black & Decker #9756 with good results. This has two temperature settings, 500F and 1000F. Read the safety instructions that comes with the unit. Work with the 500F setting at a good distance at first (say 15") and move the gun frequently until you get a feel for it. Generally the closer you get and/or the hotter the air coming out of the gun, the quicker you have to move the gun (less exposure time) to avoid overheating the covering.

 

POLYCOTE ECS - Tools - For working with POLYCOTE ECS

 

9.10. VMAR - Cowl Installation - Information & Tips
9.10.1. Cowl - Custom Fitting Tips

We have embedded here a link to the VMAR Bird Dog ARF Assembly and Operations Manual. Although the manual is intended to specifically provide for assembly of the Bird Dog, modelers may find Stage 13 on page 9 to be of help when mounting any cowl.

We have also attached a PDF reprint from the Model Airplane News "Flight Ready" book of tips and techniques related to ARF model airplanes. Copyright (c) 2004 Model Airplane News. All Rights Reserved. Used by Permission. The PDF outlines a simple reliable method to measure, cut and fit a cowl around an engine without the use of a dummy cowl.

In summary,  the Bird Dog manual gives a good overview of a technique for mounting a cowl on the fuselage somewhat irrespective of engine cut outs while the Model Airplane News reprint focusses on cutting the cowl to accomodate your muffler and engine head, carb etc. We suggest readers review both of these before mounting their cowl.

Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. Acrobat Reader can be downloaded free from www.adobe.com or by clicking on the icon below.

Get Adobe Reader

 

 

9.10.2. Cowl - Retaining Screws - Using

Question: My VMAR ARF came with a nice fibreglass cowl and 3 or 4 retaining screws. How do I use the screws?

Answer: Generally we recommend screwing the screws into the edge of the fixed firewall at the forward end of the fuselage. Use one screw on each side and one at the top of the cowl. Or you may wish to go with two screws on each side and forego having a screw at the top. Leave any opening (slack space) at the top and sides, try to avoid a gap at the top.

To prevent the holes from chaffing out under vibration you may wish to enlarge the holes just large enough to accomodate a small rubber grommet (servo grommets work well for this) and then put a flat washer under the head of each screw.

Before drilling any holes in your cowl, we recommend thoroughly reviewing your manual AND the related articles attached here. The article from Model Airplane News is well worth reading.

Cowl - Custom Fitting Tips

We have embedded here a link to the VMAR Bird Dog ARF Assembly and Operations Manual. Although the manual is intended to specifically provide for assembly of the Bird Dog, modelers may find Stage 13 on page 9 to be of help when mounting any cowl.

We have also attached a PDF reprint from the Model Airplane News "Flight Ready" book of tips and techniques related to ARF model airplanes. Copyright (c) 2004 Model Airplane News. All Rights Reserved. Used by Permission. The PDF outlines a simple reliable method to measure, cut and fit a cowl around an engine without the use of a dummy cowl.

In summary,  the Bird Dog manual gives a good overview of a technique for mounting a cowl on the fuselage somewhat irrespective of engine cut outs while the Model Airplane News reprint focusses on cutting the cowl to accomodate your muffler and engine head, carb etc. We suggest readers review both of these before mounting their cowl.

Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. Acrobat Reader can be downloaded free from www.adobe.com or by clicking on the icon below.

Get Adobe Reader

 

 

9.11. VMAR - Electric Power Conversions & Requirements
9.11.1. What Electric Motor, Speed Control, Battery, Prop etc works with what model?

Question: What electric motor, speed control and battery should I use when converting my VMAR ARF to electric or when powering my VMAR Electric ARF?

Answer: This is a rapidly expanding area of RC modeling and there is a wide range of products coming into the market along with some rather dubious claims and some strong opinions about what is good and what is bad. Rather than getting ourselves and our customers in hot water working with third party heresay recommendations we have determined that aside from products that we have tested ourselves we are not able to make recommendations regarding specific electric power systems. In general, you will require an electric motor of comparable power to that produced by the size of engine recommended for your model. You will also require an electronic speed control (ESC), a battery pack, wirning harness, fuse and connectors. A suitable prop will also be required and it will usually be considerably different than they prop you would use on a glow engine.

Although there are many things to consider, if the flying weight remains the same and your electric motor produces similar thrust (power) as engines recommended for your model, you are on the right track. If the weight goes up and the thrust goes down, you are headed for problems and the model will likely not fly.

As of Sept 2005, we have released our VMAR L19 Bird Dog and VMAR Electric Aero Subaru ARF and both of these products have been tested extensively with a battery, motor and speed control system that we are able to recommend and supply. Please see our web site at www.richmondrc.com

9.12. VMAR - Engine Mounting - General Information & Tips
9.12.1. Installing Engines on the Mounts - Clamp or Drill.

We occasionally get inquiries from modelers who are concerned that their engine will not fit on the VMAR engine mounts supplied with VMAR ARF's. Although there is no way to guarantee that the VMAR engine mounts will accomodate every engine on the market we are quite careful to make sure that VMAX and most other popular engines fit on the mounts, provided that the engine is of the recommended size. Discussions with consumers reveals that some modellers occasionally misunderstand the way the engine mount is to be used or do unnecessary work (drilling) when installing their engines.

Resolution:

In Brief: The VMAR clamp style engine mounts do not have to be drilled for most engines. The engine lugs fit between the engine mount beams and the clamping plates. Generally the instruction manuals illustrate how to use the clamping plates.

In Detail: No drilling is normally required to use the VMAR clamp style engine mount. Remove the four black machine bolts and clamping plates from the engine mount beams. Place the engine on the engine mount beams and reinstall the clamping plates and bolts so that the clamping plates are above the engine lugs and the bolts are placed such that one bolt is ahead of each engine lug and one bolt is aft of each engine lug. Align the engine to be pointing straight ahead or slightly to the right and tighten the clamping bolts firmly to hold the engine in place.

Generally the clamping plates have three bolt holts to allow for two different orientations and different fore and aft locating of the engines. Four Stroke engines should be set further foreward if they are too long aft of the engine lugs. In the event that an engine does not fit on the beams with the clamps and bolts in place, the bolts should be removed and the engine mount drilled or drilled and tapped for bolts to pass through the engine and the lugs in the traditional manner.

Some engines such as the OS LA series have narrower cases than others and may be pose difficulties when mounting.  If modelers are determined to install an OS LA they may have to remove the engine mounts and respace them closer together. The engine mounts can be removed by undoing the mounting bolts from the back of the beams i.e. inside the fuel tank compartment slightly aft of the beams or, depending on the model, when blind nuts have been installed behind the firewall the bolts can be loosened from the front.  Alternatively, modellers may wish to leave the engine mounts in place per the factory location and use a plywood adapter plate to accomodate the OS LA. Use 1/8" or thicker plywood. To make a plywood adapter plate, remove the four machine black machine screws and clamping plates from the engine mounts. Make the adapter large enough to completely cover the flat area of engine beams... from left to right and from the beam forward tip to the aft end near the firewall ensuring that the adapter plate is sized to sit flat on the engine beams. Mount the plywood plate to the engine beams with the four screws and washers. Do not reuse the metal engine clamps. Now position your engine on top of the plywood plate, center it and mark the cutout area you will require in the plate center area so that your engine lugs can sit down upon and be supported by the plywood. Cut away the engine clearance area. Center and mount the engine using machine bolts/nuts/washers... the bolts should pass through the engine lug holes and the plywood adapter plate.

Some engines have wider crankcases or in cases where a larger engine is being installed and the beams are not wide enough apart, they beams can be removed and reinstalled with a wider stance OR filing the clamping plates to accomodate the case width may help where only a small additional bit of clearance is required.

9.12.2. Engine Orientation - Upright, Sideways, Inverted - Relation to Position on FIrewall

Question: How do I position my engine on the engine mounts and on the firewall when I intend on installing the engine at an angle or inverted rather than upright?

Short Answer: Regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. There are a few exceptions as described below.

Better Answer: Some models pretty much force you to install your engine in an upright orientation. Other models, particularly once you move up from basic trainers, offer you a variety of engine orientation options. Rotated 90 degrees is one such choice that often works well with Pitts style mufflers...  inverted (sometimes called 180 degree rotation) is another choice. Generally these non-upright orientations, hide more of the engine and muffler and result in a more realistic scale like appearance to the model.

The choice of what angle to use is pretty much up to you, limited by the physical size of the engine, muffler, cowl etc. Some engines for example can be oriented at 90 or 135 degrees but run into a physical problem at other angles... they hit something, the muffler won't clear the fuselage, the needle valve is at an awkward location etc. When selecting an angle to mount your engine, you have to balance off appearance, convenience, practicality and most of all make sure it can physically fit. Don't forget to test your planned installation angle with the muffler and carb installed. Also check out your engine manual for any specific guidance from the engine manufacturer. Some manufacturers don't recommend an exactly inverted 180 degree installation. We have found this to be good advice in many cases... 180 degree inversions have a tendency to smother the glow plug in oil and residue if run at low RPM for too long.

Once you've decided on the installation orientation that you want, the actual position of the engine on the firewall is no different with a rotated engine than it is with an upright engine. The engine thrust is always centered around the crankshaft and regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. The horizontal thrust line is often drawn on the firewall or is to be draw on the firewall by you after referencing location information in the model instruction manual.  

There are some exceptions but the exceptions are few and far between... if the mounting face of the engine mounting lugs is offset from the center line of the crankshaft you have to adjust accordingly. This is rare, we have not seen this in standard two stroke engines. Engine manufacturers avoid this if at all possible. If you are working with a large gas engine adapted from another industry or a multi piston engine, examine the mounting system carefully and make sure you understand the relation between the engine mounting lugs and the center line of the crankshaft.

 

9.12.3. Engine Mounts - Plastic vs Aluminum - Interchangeable

Question: Which engine mounts are supposed to come with my model... Aluminum or Plastic type mounts?

Answer: Either Plastic or Aluminum mounts could be supplied depending on availability when your ARF was produced and packed at the factory.

Better Answer: The Plastic and Aluminum mounts are interchangeable. Both use the heavy duty metal clamping bars and machine bolts and nuts... only the base material of the T-Beam itself is different. Depending on availability from our suppliers we supply either type. Given increases in availability we are planning on moving all production to the plastic mount by the end of 2005 unless the model has a specific need for the aluminum mount.

 

 

9.12.4. Engine Mounts - Slight Variations in Finish & Surface Complexion

Question: Is it important that the two T-Beam Engine Mounts be exactly the same in appearance, smoothness and/or surface shape or size?

Answer: No. It does not matter.

Better Answer: No. It does not matter. There are several molds that make the T-Beam Engine Mounts and variations in appearance, smoothness, surface shape and/or size can be found between parts made in the different molds. These are a clamp style mount and the top surface of the T-Beam that lies against the engine lugs is flat. The sides and other appearance attributes of the mount do not affect its performance or suitability.

9.12.5. Engine Mounts - Without Clamps - How to Use

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model with an Engine Mount with no clamps. I bought my model in the summer or fall of 2004. Why does my engine mount not have clamps and how do I use it with my engine?

Answer: In response to some feedback from modellers we produced a limited number of models in the summer and fall of 2004 with no clamps to gauge public acceptance in advance of our 2005 production schedule. A set of four motor mount bolts, nuts and washers or 4 self tapping screws were included with each such ARF in lieu of the clamps. Position your engine so that the engine lug forward edge is about 15/16" back from the forward end of the engine mount.

If your model came with bolts, mark and then drill the mount with a 5/32" bit and bolt the engine directly to the engine mounts using the 4 bolts, nuts and washers provided.

If your model came with self tapping screws, drill the mount with a 1/16" drill bit to make pilot holes and then expand the holes to about 2/3 of the diameter of the screws provided. Do not over-enlarge the holes.

 

9.12.6. Engine Width - Will my engine fit between the VMAR pre-installed engine mounts?

Question: I have already purchased a .40 to .52 size engine. How do I know if my engine will fit properly between the engine mounts that are installed in many VMAR ARF's?

Answer: Most popular .40 to .52 size two stroke engine cases will fit between the engine mounts that are pre-installed in many VMAR ARF's. Most popular two stroke engines of this size have similar case dimensions. For example the VMAX, Thunder Tiger and OS .40-.52 size engines are very similar in size. The OS 40LA and 46LA have non-standard (too narrow) cases and pose difficult installation problems. We do not recommend the use of these engines unless you are able to modify either the engine mount T-beam spacing by removing and reinstalling the engine mounts OR can build and install a shim set (2 shims) to narrow the gap between the pre-installed engine T-Beams OR can cut a 1/8-3/32" plywood mounting plate and install it on top of the T-beams after cutting a horseshoe U-shaped recess for the engine case. 

Supplementary Information: Although case sizes vary somewhat we have ensured that most popular engines fit. To get an idea of a typical case size that does fit, consult the VMAX .46 - .52 Engine Operations Manual at ... http://142.179.114.175/novo/default.asp?SID=&Lang=1&id=4002&Lang=1&SID= See the dimensional diagram on Page 7 and note carefully the sizes denoted D, A and G. Metric dimensions in mm can be converted into imperial inches by dividing by 25.4
 
Some engines may be a tight fit when trying to install them. In this situation we recommend removing the steel clamp plates from the factory installed engine T-beam engine mount and using self tapping sheet metal screws or bolts, nuts and washers when trying to install a tight fitting engine. If the engine case is too wide to fit between the factory installed engine mount T-beams after the metal clamps plates have been removed from the engine mounts carefully determine how much additional clearance you required.  If you need only 1-2 mm more of total clearance to accomodate your engine, you may wish to grind or file away up to 1mm of material from the inside faces of each engine mount T-beam. If more than 1-2 mm of total clearance is needed to install your engine, you will need to consider a different engine or repositioning the factory provided engine mount T-beams or replacing the factory installed engine mount with a third party engine mount having enough clearance to accomodate your particular engine.  
9.12.7. Firewall - Finished Appearance & Sealing - Tips and Hints

Question: Can I finish my firewall to enhance it's appearance and seal it against oil and fuel?

Answer: Yes.

Better Answer: The firewalls are made from either 6mm plywood or multiple layers of thinner 2-3mm plywood laminated together. They are more than strong enough for any modelling application. They will withstand oil and fuel without further treatment or finishing. If you wish to seal the edges and faces that is also fine. When finishing, we suggest checking the edges for any voids, fill them with CA or Epoxy and then seal the edges and faces with finishing resin or epoxy. Let dry and then install your engine mounts and tank.

9.12.7.1. Firewall - Templates - VMAX Engines on RRC-MOUNTUNP Mount

Question: I want to make a new firewall and install a VMAX Engine using the standard VMA-MOUNTUNP componsite Engine Mount. Do you have any Templates that I could use a cutting and drilling guides?

Answer: Yes, please see the attached PDF files below. These are a bit rough and ready but they should do the trick.

9.12.8. Firewall - Thrust Lines - Can they be moved from the factory location?

Question: I am installing my engine and I'd like to shift the thrust line. Is this OK?

Answer: Well... it depends! The factory location for the vertical and horizontal thrust lines is fairly important and the best option is to not depart from the factory specs regarding thrust lines. However, we recognize that some engines and some engine orientations may look better aesthetically if they are shifted somewhat from the factory thrust line locations.

Our advice in this regard is as follows:

1) Do not shift the left and right location of the engine from the location of the vertical thrust line recommended for the model. i.e. keep the engine centered on the firewall with respect to left and right. If you need a bit of left or right thrust, use the power module nut and bolt spacing system or the engine mounting angle to change the thrust angle but do not offset the engine itself to the left or right.

2) You can shift the engine slightly higher or lower on the firewall than indicated by the location of the horizontal thrust line on the firewall. Don't go crazy... a centimeter maybe is a good maximum guideline depending on the model and how you plan on using it. The more you depart from the recommended location the more risk you are taking that this will adversely and significantly affect the flying characteristics of the model. Again, if all you want to do is induce some up or down thrust, use the the power module nut and bolt spacing system or the engine mounting angle to change the thrust angle rather than offset the entire engine up or down.

To understand what is happening when you shift the thrust lines by moving the engine up or down, left or right on the firewall.... it helps to take things to an extreme in your head. Consider nailing a 48" long 2x4 plank to your firewall so that the plank is pointing up and down and centered over the firewall so that 24" is above the center of the firewall and 24" is below the center of the firewall.

Now imagine mounting your engine to the front of the top end of the 2x4 and think what would happen when you rev up the propeller. The engine thrust would pull the top of the 2x4 forward and torque (twist) the nose of the model downwards. So applying power would result in the model pointing down... not really what you expected but that's what will happen! This will require aggressive amounts of up elevator to correct and the degree of up elevator required will constantly change not only with the engine thrust per RPM and prop selection but with the degree of effectiveness of the elevator depending on the air speed of the model. So every time you change the tprop or the throttle setting (RPM) of the motor or the models air speed you will need to adjust the elevator trim. Talk about a pain in the butt!

Now let's go the other way... imagine mounting your engine to the bottom end of the 2x4 and think would would happen when you rev up the propeller. The engine thrust would pull the bottom of the 2x4 forward and torque (twist) the nose upwards... i.e. applying power will result in the model pointing up. This will in turn require lots of down elevator to compensate for and the amount of down elevator needed will constantly change depending upon engine thrust and the effectiveness of any down elevator setting will in turn vary with the air speed of the model. Every time you change throttle setting of the motor or the prop or the air speed of the model, you will need to adjust the elevator trim. Big time headache!

So taking our imaginary extreme analogy and putting it into context of a typical model without a big honking 2x4 nailed to the front of the firewall... here are the results of moving the engine up or down from the recommended thrust line location:

a) Moving the motor below the recommended thrust line will pitch up the nose somewhat and require varying amounts of down elevator trim depending upon RPM, prop selection and air speed of the model.

b)  Moving the motor above the recommended thrust line will pitch down the nose somewhat and require varying amounts of up elevator trim depending upon RPM, prop selection and air speed of the model. 

c) The pitch up and pitch down forces will increase as you move the engine further from the recommended thrust line.

d) The further you shift the thrust line the more "snaky" and jumpy the model will tend to be as you vary throttle settings and the more difficult it will be to fly in a controlled and predictable manner.

9.12.9. Firewall - Thrust Lines - Where are they? Horizontal and Vertical

Question: I am installing my engine. Where are the thrust lines on the firewall?

Answer: The horizontal thrust line normally appears on the forward face of the firewall or you draw the horizontal thrust line on the forward face of the firewall yourself following location instructions contained in the documentation that came with your model.

If there is no horizontal line indicated on the firewall and you are unable to locate the location of the line in the reference material there is an easy way to position the horiztonal thrust line youself. To do this, fit your cowl over the fuselage. Look at the cowl from the left and right sides and adjust the vertical angle of the cowl to align with the fuselage. There should not be any sharp drop or rise in the silhouette profile of the fuselage as you move your eye along the fuselage and over the cowl. Once you have the cowl in place, look through the front hole where the crankshaft is going to protrude. Mark the horizontal thrust line on the firewall so that it is evenly located up and down with respect to the hole in the front of the cowl.

The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. If it is not shown, you can simply draw it into place. Make sure it is in the middle.

You may also find this information on our web site. Look for the links to your model, then the link to the detailed information and browse down to the engine section. The position of the horizontal and/or vertical thrust line may be stated there.

9.12.10. Firewall - What is it? What is it for? Do I have one?

Question: What is a Firewall? 

Answer: The firewall is the flat plate or wall like component that the engine mounts are attached to. All propeller driven model airplanes have a firewall. It is located near the front of the model just behind the engine.

Better Answer: The term firewall comes from the first use of internal combustion engines in cars and aircraft and dates back to even earlier usage in the 1800's. If we take the word apart into its elements it is exactly what is says it is... a Fire Wall.

Internal combustion engines like model airplane engines... burn fuel. They get hot, very hot. This heat is ok for the engine but is not generally a good thing for the rest of the aircraft. The Fire Wall separates the hot, heavy engine from the rest of the aircraft.

In most propellor driven aircraft the firewall is just aft of the engine and is a wall that pretty much caps the forward end of the fuselage. The engine mounts are attached to the forward face of the firewall and the engine in turn is attached to the engine mounts.

In VMAR models the firewall is generally a piece of plywood that looks like a small flat plate. The firewall may be round or elliptical, or be squarish in shape with rounded corners and measure 3 to 8+ inches across. It is usually about 6mm (1/4") thick.

 

9.12.11. Using 4 Stroke Engines on VMAR Models

Question: Can I use a 4 Stroke engine on my VMAR ARF model?

Answer: In most cases, Yes.

Better Answer: There are some things to consider here. First of all if the model has a cowl it will usually have a power module consisting of a removeable forward firewall and a set of engine mounts. These engine mounts can be oriented in many different ways so you can select the orientation and separation of the mounts to suit your engine. It is also very easy to work on with this setup because the forward firewall is completely removeable from the model. So... VMAR models with a cowl and power module probably will be able to accomodate a 4 stroke engine. Conversely... models without a cowl and power module usually have a factory installed engine mount and a fixed firewall only and may be more problematic when trying to fit them out with a 4 stroke engine. It is safe to say that if the model does not have a cowl and power module there may be significant work and mucking around in order to install a 4 stroke engine.

4 stroke engines are not as standardized as most 2 stroke engines... some have the carburetors at the front, some at the back. Some have valve pushrods running up the front of the crankcase... some up the back. As a consequence, 4 stroke engines vary quite a bit in length (i.e. the distance from the prop shaft to the back of the engine) within a particular size. Although for example a 2 stroke .46 from one supplier will be very similar in external size to that of a 2 stroke .46 from another supplier... it is not necessarily the case when comparing 4 strokes. A .52 four stroke from one manufacturer can be quite different from a .52 four stroke from another manufacturer. There is no way we can be aware of all the different sizes and shapes of four stroke engines in the market and modelers should be checking with the engine manufacturer for sizes before assuming that the engine will fit into any particular model. Once you know the length of the four stroke engine that you are considering, place the cowl on your model. Then measure from where the back plate of the spinner will be to the front face of the removeable power module firewall. Subtract about 1.25" from this distance and then compare the result with the length of your four stroke engine. Engines that exceed this length will significantly protrude from the front of the cowl and should be trial fitted carefully before purchase.

In some cases, we are pre-cutting cowls to make installation of our recommended 2 stroke engine go as quickly and easily as possible. We do stock blank (not cut) cowls for those who wish to use a differnet 2 stroke engine size (for example a .61 instead of a .46) or a 4 stroke instead of a 2 stroke or want to go with an inverted installation or other orientation when we may have assumed a 90 orientation when pre-cutting the factory cowl.

Lastly, we have some models that do not use a cowl per-se and do not have a power module but may look like they do. For example the F4U Phantom and Skyhawk and Arrow Tiger have a shaped and fitted nose section but not a cowl and we have not recommended 4 stroke engines for these models at all. Again, if we do not use a cowl and power module on a model... we may be significant work and mucking around in order to install a 4 stroke engine.

Please note that to this point this article makes no attempt to explain the differences between the different types of engine systems. For some of the pro's and con's of 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines please the article included below:

Engine Types and Power Considerations - 2 Stroke, 4 Stroke & Glow vs Gas vs Electric

Question: What gives with Model Airplanes Engines? What's a 2 stroke? What's a 4 Stroke? What do you mean by Glow as compared to Gas? Now there are electric motors being adapted to replace engines... how the heck do I choose what is right for my model?

Answer: Well, answers to this can take a bit of explaining. Here is an overview.

2 Stroke (sometimes called 2 cycle)

  • Is what the majority of current modelers mean when they say "Model Airplane" or "Glow" Engine
  • Noisy screaming type of sound that must be carefully muffled and never sounds like the real thing.
  • Uses Model Airplane Fuel (alcohol, oil, nitromethane and additives)
  • Uses a Glow Plug hence the term "Glow" Engine.
  • Generally the cheapest, lightest, most powerful engine for the money.
  • Referred to by displacment in hundreds of cubic inches (or in cubic centimeters = cc)
  • Imperial measure is cubic inches and a slang has developed
    • .40 cubic inches is referred to as "a 40"
    • .90 cubic inches is referred to as "a 90"
    • 1.20 cubic inches is referred to as "a 120"
  • Generally range in size from .049 to 1.80 although some smaller and bigger engines exist.

4 Stroke (sometimes called 4 cycle)

  • Has become more popular since the 90's with those wanting quieter more realistic engine sound for use in semi-scale or scale models.
  • Quieter more familiar engine sound when in the air. Much more realistic for scale flying models. Sounds much more like the real thing.
  • Uses Model Airplane Fuel (alcohol, oil, nitromethane and additives) although special blends with more or less oil and more or less nitro may be required for some engines.
  • Uses a Glow Plug hence the term "Glow" Engine can be used for either 2 stroke or 4 stroke engines
  • Generally costs more, weighs more and gives less power for more money than a 2 stroke engine of similar size.
  • Referred to by displacment in hundreds of cubic inches (or in cubic centimeters = cc)
  • Imperial measure is cubic inches and a slang has developed
    • .52 cubic inches is referred to as "a 52"
    • .91 cubic inches is referred to as "a 91"
  • Generally range in size from .25 to 2.50 although some smaller and bigger engines exist.
  • To get the same power as a 2 stroke, add on about 30-50% in size. This is a very rough rule and does not consider weight and torque issues but it is a good guide.
    • A model calling for a 2 stroke .46 would require roughly a 4 stroke of size .60-.70
    • A model calling for a 2 stroke .61 would require roughly a 4 stroke of size .80-.90

Gas (sometimes called Ignition Engine)

  • Has become more popular for use with big models.
  • Quieter more familiar engine sound when in the air. Much more realistic for scale flying models. Sounds like the real thing  because it pretty well is the real thing!
  • Uses Gasoline. Special oil or additives may be added to the gas in some cases. Gas is 25-50% cheaper than Model Airplane Fuel.
  • Uses a Spark Plug hence the term "Ignition".
  • Often adapted by the manufacturer from some other purpose such as a weed eater, leave blower etc. Although the engines end up quite different with regards to fuel supply, ignition, prop adapter and flywheel etc, they usually started with an existing product and adapted from there.
  • Seldom used on smaller models and nearly always used on big models due to the higher weight of the engine and ignition system.
  • Generally costs more, weighs more and gives less power for more money that a 2 stroke engine of similar size. May cost and weigh more than a 4 cycle Glow engine.
  • Referred to by displacement in cubic centimeters (cc) (or in cubic inches but almost universally now in cc)
  • Metric measure is cubic centimeters (cc) and the cc is nearly always noted in referring to these engines
    • for example "30 cc"
  • Generally range in size from 20cc to about 65cc although some smaller and considerable numbers of bigger engines exist.

Electric Motors (both brush type and brushless type)

  • Have become more popular since 2000. Increasing in popularity
  • Just as a combustion  Engine needs and is succesful depending on the type of fuel it burns, an electric Motor needs batteries.
  • As battery technology put more and more power (run time) into batteries of a certain weight (we call this energy density) electric powered flight is starting to take off (literally)
  • Generally brushless motors are taking over. They can be very expensive when coupled to a suitable electronic speed control and a good set of NiMh or LiPo batteries.
  • Main advantage is quieter and no mess. No fuel to buy.
  • Main disadvantage is price and flight time per charge.
  • They will continue to improve and be more popular in time.
  • The rating system is not yet standardized so it is hard to compare apples with applies. Generally if a model calls for a .40 two stroke engine, modelers need to select an electric motor that can provide similar power in order to have similar flight characteristics. This can vary widely by motor type (brushless is better), battery type, speed control and wiring.

Please note that to this point this article makes no attempt to advise on if a particular model can be adapted to accomodate a different type of power system. For some considerations related to fitting 4 stroke engines into a model please search on "Four Stroke" for further assistance.

9.13. VMAR - Engine Power Module - Information & Tips
9.13.1. Power Module - Alignment - What angle to use?

Question: My VMAR ARF uses the VMAR Power Module system. What angle should I align the Power Module at?

Answer: The VMAR Power Module system uses a fixed firewall "ring" permanently attached to the fuselage and a removable forward firewall "plate" to which the engine mounts are installed. Four stud bolts protrude from the fixed firewall ring and are used to set the offset spacing and hence the angle between the fixed firewall ring and the removable firewall plate.
 
This system provides a great deal of control over the offset spacing ("gap") between the firewalls to accommodate a wide range of different engine depths and spinner types. By varying the placement of the retaining bolts and washers on the four stud bolts, modelers can also control both the horizontal and vertical engine thrust angles.
 
We recommend a default setting for the horizontal and vertical engine thrust angles of 0, 0 respectively by having a consistent (equal valued) offset between the fixed firewall ring and forward firewall plate. The most common departure for this default configuration is 1-3 degrees of right thrust to assist with take offs. The vertical thrust angle can be adjusted as well if for example a particular engine power and weight combination results in "ballooning" of the model when additional power is applied above a cruise setting sufficient to maintain level flight. Such ballooning is often an indication of the need to adjust vertical thrust angles.  
 
The default 0.0 settings are the best place to start remembering that the VMAR Power Module system makes it easy to make incremental adjustments to the horizontal and vertical thrust angles as fliers become more familiar with their model and engine power settings. No setting is irreversible. The thrust angles can be changed at any time.
9.13.2. Power Module - Distance from fixed Firewall - How Much?

Question: My VMAR ARF uses the VMAR Power Module system. How much space should I allow between the fixed (aft) firewall attached the fuselage and the power module (adjustable) firewall?

Answer: The VMAR Power Module system uses a fixed firewall "ring" permanently attached to the fuselage and a removable forward firewall "plate" to which the engine mounts are installed. Four stud bolts protrude from the fixed firewall ring and are used to set the offset spacing and the angle between the fixed firewall ring and the removable firewall plate.
 
This system provides a great deal of control over the offset spacing ("gap") between the firewalls to accommodate a wide range of different engine depths and spinner types. By varying the placement of the retaining bolts and washers on the four stud bolts, modelers can adjust the gap and also control both the horizontal and vertical engine thrust angles.
 
We recommend first checking the assembly manual for your model and any specific Read Me First or Knowledge Base articles that may refer to this specific question as it pertains to your model.
 
In the absense of any specific documentation, we suggest the following:
 
a) Look over the cowl mounting tips provided in your assembly manual and in the article referenced below. Without installing the power module, mock up your cowl installation on the fuselage. No need to actually cut the cowl out at this point. Just align it and angle it etc per the articles and your assembly manual. Generally this leaves the back edge of the cowl overlapping the front of the fuselage by about .125-.25 in. (3-6mm). Mark the edge of the cowl with low tack masking tape for later reference.
 
b) Measure the distance between the front of the cowl crankshaft clearance hole and the forward face of the fixed firewall attached to the fuselage.
 
c) Now remove the cowl from the fuselage. Install your engine mounts to the power module firewall and your engine to the engine mounts.
 
d) Install the power module firewall with engine mounts and engine onto the four threaded studs using the nuts and washer arrangement outlined in your assembly manual.
 
e) Position the power module firewall so that the distance from the fixed firewall (fuselage front) to the forward face of the engine thrust washer (behind the prop) is about .125-.25 in. (3-6mm) longer than the distance measured in b) above. You can adjust the location of the power module firewall and the engine on the mounts to obtain this distance.
 
f) This can be a bit of an iterative process. You may have to try several different positions to get the optimum solution for your particular engine and model combination. Work slowly and patiently. Try to think ahead about eventually cutting out the cowl to clear your engine and muffer. Also the location of the fuel tank. type of spinner and prop etc. Also the thrust angles etc. We have referenced a thrust angle article below to keep in mind when adjusting the distance between the fixed firewall and the power module firewall.
 
g) Remember that the power module system gives you tremendous flexibility to accomodate a great number of different engines. If it does not work out on the first try, don't sweat it, we've given you a system that you can easily adjust many times until you get it the way you want it.
9.13.3. Power Module - Wood - Quality of Plywood

Question: A friend of mine has a VMAR model from a couple of years back. It has a power module with removeable firewall. He mentioned to me that the plywood used was strong but was not attractive to look at. Is this still the case?

Answer: We have been upgrading our plywood and sourcing new supplies since early 2004. Except for older production that may still be in the distribution chain, all firewalls now have a better and cleaner appearance. That said, please note that we were dealing with a cosmetic issue here. All firewalls have been more than strong enough to work well with the model they were supplied with.

9.13.4. Power Module - Wood - Laminations - Visible

Question: When I look at the edge of my power module firewall, I can see small gaps between some of the laminations. Is this normal? Is it OK? Is it coming apart?

Answer: Yes this is normal. Yes it is OK. No it will not come apart.

Expanded Answer: The power module wood firewall is made from 2 or 3 plywood layers that have then been laminated together with epoxy to produce a firewall that is approximately 1/4" (6mm) thick. There will be a wider gap between the plywood pieces than between the individual plys within a plywood piece. This is normal. The power module firewalls are extremely strong and are held together in operational use not only by Epoxy but by four engine mounting bolts and four power module to fuselage stud and nut sets. This represents 8 mechanical fasteners in addition to the epoxy between layers... all acting over an area less than the size of a dinner plate.

Short of a very violent crash the power module firewall is not going to come apart. Small gaps or voids in the plys or in the bonding layer between plywood pieces are not going to impact on the performance of the power module firewall in our application.

If you are wondering about sealing the power module firewall, please see below:

Power Module - Wood - How to Seal?

Question: Should I seal the wood power module firewall that came with my VMAR ARF?

Answer: It's not really necessary but it probably can't hurt aside from adding a bit of weight. If you have an hour or so and the right materials, you can improve the cosmetic appearance of the power module firewall by sealing it.

For those who wish to seal the edges and faces of the power module firewall, we recommend Pacer ZAP-A-GAP CA+ for filling edge voids or edge gaps between layers and then after the CA+ has cured, apply Pacer Finishing Resin to the edges and the front and rear faces of the firewall.

9.13.5. Power Module - Wood - How to Seal?

Question: Should I seal the wood power module firewall that came with my VMAR ARF?

Answer: It's not really necessary but it probably can't hurt aside from adding a bit of weight. If you have an hour or so and the right materials, you can improve the cosmetic appearance of the power module firewall by sealing it.

For those who wish to seal the edges and faces of the power module firewall, we recommend Pacer ZAP-A-GAP CA+ for filling edge voids or edge gaps between layers and then after the CA+ has cured, apply Pacer Finishing Resin to the edges and the front and rear faces of the firewall.

9.13.6. Power Module - Retaining Nuts - Self Locking & Plated

Question: What type of retaining nuts are used with the Power Module?

Answer: Prior to mid 2004, we used a lightly plated metric nut. These worked but occasionally rusted and required thread locker to ensure they stayed tight.

Since mid 2004 we have used a plated (chrome look) metric self locking hex nut like you would find on high end machinery. These look better, work better and do not require thread locker.

9.14. VMAR - Flaps & Flaperons - General Information and Tips
9.14.1. Flaps - If provided must they be used or is usage optional?

Question: My VMAR model comes complete wtih Flaps. Do I have to use them or is usage optional?

Answer: No you do not have to use the flaps. Although we have provided flaps with the model, you can simply lock the flaps in place at a neutral position and fly without activating them. We'd suggest that if you are going to go that route, install the control horns to the flaps and run the control rods to a fixed point near the flap servo cavity trays. Some folks actually mount a servo wheel to the servo cavity cover and attach the control rod to the servo wheel or even install flap servos as they would normally do for flap operation but don't hook the servos up to your receiver. This latter solution in effect has you all ready to use the flaps should you decide to later on.

9.14.2. Flaperons - If provided must they be used or is usage optional?

Question: My VMAR model comes complete wtih flaperons. Do I have to use them or is usage optional?

Answer: No you do not have to use the flaperons. Although we have provided flaperons with the model, you can simply use them as ailerons. You will need a computer radio to make the ailerons work as flaperons and this is entirely optional... they will work just fine as ailerons only.

For further information about flaperons please review the following article:

 

Flaperon Ready - What does it Mean? What are Flaperons anyway?

Question: What are Flaperons and what is meant by the term Flaperon Ready?

Answer: The term Flaperons is used to describe Ailerons that can act as Ailerons AND act as Flaps. When we design Ailerons so that they can or must use two servos the model is Flaperon Ready.

The Flaperons in a Flaperon Ready model are not mandatory but we have designed the model so that the Ailerons can be activated as Flaperons if you use two servos for the ailerons and a computer radio.

Better Answer: Flaps are generally used for take offs and landings only. They hang down from the back edge of the wing and increase the lift of the wing enabling the model to take off and land at slower speeds. Landing at slower speeds can make landing a little easier on the nerves. Flaps go down only.

Ailerons are used all the time in flight. Ailerons go up and down.

By using two servos and a computer radio it is possible to use an Aileron like a Flap while still using it as an Aileron. This is called a Flaperon.

When we manufacture a model we always include Ailerons. When we design Ailerons so that they can or must use two servos the model is Flaperon Ready.

To take advantage of Flaperons in a Flaperon Ready model, you must use two servos for the Ailerons and must have a computer radio.

For information regarding Flaperon Deflection please see the following article,

9.14.3. Flaps &/or Flaperons - End Sealing After Cutting - Tips and Hints?

Question: My VMAR model came with a long aileron running along almost the entire trailing edge of the wing panel. My model also came equipped with four servo mounting bays and instructions for the optional cutting of each single aileron into a flap and aileron or flap and flaperon. I have cut each single aileron as instructed. Should I seal the exposed wood ends of each of the resulting control surfaces? What should I use for sealant that will stand up to fuels and oils?

Answer: Yes you should seal the exposed wood ends so that they are fuel proof. You can use ZAP-CA as a quick sealant. Just apply a small amount at a time and let it wick into the wood. A better solution would be Pacer Finishing Resin which is a thin two part system that you mix together in equal amounts and then brush on.

9.15. VMAR - Fuel Leaks - Fuselage Soaked.- Can it be restored?

Question: I have discovered that fuel has somehow flooded the inside front section of my fuselage. Any ideas as to what caused the leak and how I might go about restoring the fuselage?

Answer: 

1) Fuel in copious amounts will gradually soften and weaken some of the glues used in your model. It takes quite a bit of fuel for a long time of exposure to really attack the adhesives and it is often noticed only when the fixed firewall suddenly pulls loose or the landing gear tears out rather neatly from the bottom of the fuselage after what appears to be pretty good landing. Such separations are usually clean indicating that the fuel has eventually broken down the adhesive and under load the parts have separated. .

2) To sort this out... first of all remove your engine, power module (if so equipped) tank and servo tray. Set everything aside. Get some kitty litter (the type with baking soda in it is best) and apply a good layer of kitty litter over all the oil soaked wood. Let it sit overnight and then discard it. Kitty Litter absorbs oil as well as other stuff! Now try to get some K2R spot remover and apply that to the oil soaked wood as well. This will absorb more oil. Let it dry and brush/vacuum it off.

3) Once you've sucked up all the oil that you can, reglue all the affected glue joints. Use Pacer ZAP-A-GAP (it is amazing on oil soaked wood... no other CA bites through oil like ZAP-A-GAP) on all the joints except those related to the landing gear and the fixed firewall. Use 30 minute (not 5 minute...30 minute) Epoxy and reglue the fixed firewall and landing gear blocks back into place. Let it dry overnight and then brush Pacer Finishing Resin over all the affected surfaces and into as many of the joints as you can reach... even those that you have reglued. You want a nice seal here... over all the wood and all the joints.

4) Once you have restored the wood and joints as best you can, the next step is remove all your external fuel tubing and discard it. Carefully check the metal tubes protruding from the tank for cracks. Use a pressure test (mouth/lung pressure is fine) and see if the tubes or tank is leaking. Check the seam of the tank carefully... a seam can split weeks or months later if the stopper has been overtightened. (many folks do this to try to make sure the stopper is sealed). Overtightening squeezes the stopper longitudinally and expands it laterally. This put tremendous pressure on the tank neck and although it may last forever, after a few weeks or months, the pressure may split the seam quite unexpectedly leading to a flood of raw fuel entering the fuselage. If only the top splits, the leakage will occur when the tank is full but slow down or stop as the fuel is consumed so it may be leaking for quite a while before it is noticed.

5) Once you have the tank and tubing all checked out and repaired/replaced to ensure a pressure tight system, re-install all of your equipment.

6) Do a thorough ground test under full RPM load before flying. Firstly you want to make sure the tank is not still leaking and secondly you want to make sure that your repair job on the wood and joints has the proper strength. Do your first flight well away from people and property and inspect the tank and joints for strutural integrity after each flight. You will have to keep an eye on things for quite a while. The oil can seep out of the wood and affect a joint at a later date... your cleanup should have done a good job of wicking up any oil, but you will need to inspect frequently thereafter. If you have any doubts about the structural integrity of your model, do not fly it.

9.16. VMAR - Fuel Proofing the Fuselage - Is it necessary?

Question: Should I fuel proof my fuselage?

Answer: Well, it depends on if your firewall is removeable.

If your firewall is not removeable, we do not recommend trying to fuel proof the fuel tank compartment. The only way fuel can get into the fuel tank compartment in this type of model is via a leaking tank or leaking tank to firewall gasket. You've generally be better off putting the time into carefully assembling the tank (do not overtighten the stopper cinch bolt) than trying to fuel proof the fuel tank compartment. Sort of a prevent leaks rather than plan for them approach.

If your firewall is removeable then it's a bit more of a six of one, a half dozen of the other type of decision. It's not really necessary but if you've got the time and material it probably won't hurt. Fuel proofing will be adding weight to the model so don't go overboard and really ladel the sealant on.

Here is some information on sealing the removeable power module firewall itself that is worth reviewing vis-a-vis considering a similar approach to fuel proofing the fuel tank compartment.

Firewall - Finished Appearance & Sealing - Tips and Hints

Question: Can I finish my firewall to enhance it's appearance and seal it against oil and fuel?

Answer: Yes.

Better Answer: The firewalls are made from either 6mm plywood or multiple layers of thinner 2-3mm plywood laminated together. They are more than strong enough for any modelling application. They will withstand oil and fuel without further treatment or finishing. If you wish to seal the edges and faces that is also fine. When finishing, we suggest checking the edges for any voids, fill them with CA or Epoxy and then seal the edges and faces with finishing resin or epoxy. Let dry and then install your engine mounts and tank.

Flaps &/or Flaperons - End Sealing After Cutting - Tips and Hints?

Question: My VMAR model came with a long aileron running along almost the entire trailing edge of the wing panel. My model also came equipped with four servo mounting bays and instructions for the optional cutting of each single aileron into a flap and aileron or flap and flaperon. I have cut each single aileron as instructed. Should I seal the exposed wood ends of each of the resulting control surfaces? What should I use for sealant that will stand up to fuels and oils?

Answer: Yes you should seal the exposed wood ends so that they are fuel proof. You can use ZAP-CA as a quick sealant. Just apply a small amount at a time and let it wick into the wood. A better solution would be Pacer Finishing Resin which is a thin two part system that you mix together in equal amounts and then brush on.

9.17. VMAR - Fuel Tanks - General Information
9.17.1. Fuel Tank - How to Measure Capacity?

Question: What is the typical capacity of the fuel tanks supplied with VMAR ARF models?

Answer: Generally 300-350ml (10-12oz)

Better Answer: To be sure you will need to determine exact capacity using a measured amount of clean water. Tanks with a plastic stopper cap, two lines and a notch in the front are approx 300ml (10oz) in capacity. Tanks without a notch in the front range up to 315-350ml (11-12oz). For more information please review the specifications for the particular tank of interest.

There are some exceptions: Control Line and small RC ARF's have a 100ml (3.3oz) tank. Dornier DO27 45 ARF's with the squat short tank have a 250ml (8oz) capacity and larger models like the 10 foot span Dehavilland Beaver have a 750ml (26oz) tank.

9.17.2. Fuel Tank - How to Install into Trainers & other models without Power Modules

Question: Once the fuel tank is assembled how do I install and secure it into my VMAR Trainer?

Answer: After assembly and pressure test, install the tank with the metal tubes protected and facing up. Use sealant to secure the black gasket to the tank and firewall from behind. Seal around neck from front. Support & surround tank with sponge foam.

Better Answer: VMAR Trainers and other non-cowled VMAR models generally do not have a power module. After tank assemly per the instruction book (all tanks assemble in a similar manner) do a pressure test and then protect the metal tubes from contamination by taping up the open ends or running a short length of fuel line between the metal tubes. Now apply sealant to both sides of black donut like rubber gasket and around the neck of the tank. Use Pacer Dap-A-Goo or clear silicone. Install the tank into the fuel tank compartment of the fuselage with the metal tubes facing up. Press the tank and sealant bead firmly against the back of the firewall and secure the tank while the sealant cures. Seal around the neck from the front of the fuselage to prevent fuel seapage into the fuselage. Support and surround the tank in the fuel tank compartment with sponge foam.

Note that in most cases, the receiver batttery pack is to be wrapped in cling film and installed beneath the fuel tank. Consult your radio manual for more information. In this case, the sponge foam should be arranged to support the tank and the battery pack.

9.17.3. Fuel Tank - How to Seal neck where it protrudes through firewall

Question: How do I install my fuel tank and seal the fuel tank neck area where it protrudes through the firewall.

Answer: Plan your fuel tank installation per the instructions in the manual that came with your model. Orient the tank and the metal tubes etc and install the tank clunk, tubing and stopper. See the illlustrations in your manual. Once you have the tank prepared, connect silicone tubing between the metal tubes so that the metal tubes are closed off and no dirt or material can get inside the metal tubing or your tank while you are working on it. Plan the position of your tank in the fuel tank compartment. See your manual. You may need some foam rubber pads or other material to position the tank on models that are not equipped with a power module. If the model has a power module, seal both sides of the forward firewall with epoxy or finishing resin and let it dry. Make sure you can dry fit the tank into place where you want it before proceeding to the next step. See your manual.

Once you have everything prepared you are ready to seal the tank into place. You will need some clear silicone or Pacer Dap-A-Goo sealant. Dap-A-Goo is perfect for this job. It's thick, dries quickly and seals well. On VMAR fuel tanks there is a foam rubber gasket around the neck of the tank. Remove the gasket. Apply a bead of sealant to the forward face of the tank in a circle about 1/4" (6mm) away from the neck. Re-install the foam rubber gasket and press it down onto the sealer. If your model has a power module system, apply a bead of sealant to the top of each dowel protruding from the back of the firewall. Keep moving and apply a second bead of sealant to the exposed face of the foam rubber gasket and press the tank firmly against the back of the firewall (and resting on the dowels if you have a power module system). Hold the tank in place with tape, elastic bands or other retainers and let the sealant dry. Apply additional sealant around the tubes (along the sides of the power module dowels if so equipped) and into the firewall passage hole from the front face of the firewall. Let the sealant dry. Remove any unnecessary retainers if they are no longer needed. Your tank is now installed and sealed into place.

9.17.4. Fuel Tank - Splitting - What causes this?

Question: After I had flown for about 3 weeks or so, my fuel tank split and fuel leaked into the foreward part of the fuselage. Any ideas what caused the tank to split?

Answer: Well you won't like to hear this... we test all our tanks before shipping and you tested it again after you assembled and installed it. So we know it was not leaking when you installed it into the ARF. We have done extensive testing and tanks that split anywhere from1 day or so to 6 months or more after installation do so when the stopper retaining screw has been overtightened. This compresses the stopper longtudinally and expands it laterally which of course is what seals the stopper in place. However, when the stopper screw is overtightened, the lateral expansion of the stopper becomes excessive and the tremendous pressure eventually splits the tank.

So... if you are using our tank or any other brand of tank, if you overtighten the stopper it will eventually split the tank or split the stopper... usually the tank. There are two ways to avoid this problem... go light on the torque... you want a seal yes but there is no need to really reaf on it. Secondly, recognizing that some folks like to use the same tools for a model airplane as a tractor (sorry but it's true), we invented our safety stopper to further reduce the chances that the tank will split.

Here is some information about our safety stopper.

Fuel Tank - What does "Safety Stopper mean?

Question: What does it mean in a VMAR model when I see the term "Safety Stopper"?

Answer: Beginning in mid 2004, the VMAR factory began a gradual change to a new 3 line tank with a metal overcap that aside from the convenience of a 3 line tank, helps prevent tank splitting due to overtightening of the stopper expansion bolt. The metal cap covers the end of the stopper like the older plastic disk units and also extends down and around the neck of the tank to prevent the stopper from being over compressed and splitting the tank. So, we call this new stopper and metal cap system "Safety Stopper" because it helps prevent the tank from splitting.

9.17.5. Fuel Tank - Three (3) Line Safety Stopper

Question: Which models come with fuel tanks equipped with the three line safety stopper?

Answer: The three line safety stopper was introduced into production across the VMAR ARF line in mid 2004.

Modelers who may wish to upgrade to the three line safety stopper can purchase this stopper as part number VMA-TANKCAP3

9.17.6. Fuel Tank - Two (2) Lines or Three (3) ? What's the third fuel line for?

Question: My VMAR ARF model came with a three (3) line fuel tank stopper. What is the third line for?

Answer: The third line is a fuel fill line that allows you to fill the fuel tank without using the line that normally supplies fuel to the carburetor.

More Information: With a two line system, one fuel line supplies fuel from the fuel tank to the carburetor and the other line normally supplies muffler pressure to the fuel tank. When adding fuel to the tank, since there is a clunk on the fuel end of the line running to the carburetor, filling must take place through this fuel supply line which necessitates removing the line from the carburetor fuel nipple. This is a nuisance and can result in a split at the end of line when done many times. Such splits can result in leakage and difficulty in setting a reliable mixture setting.

By adding a third line, the fuel line that supplies fuel to the carburetor can be left in place during fueling. Fuel is added to the fuel tank through the fuel fill line (i.e. the third line).

After fueling close the fuel fill line off with a plug to allow the muffler pressure line to pressurize the fuel tank.

Note: Most engine manufacturers stress the importance of NOT flooding the engine with fuel during the fueling process. If you flood the engine with fuel and then try to turn it over with an electric starter you can severely damage any or all of the following components; piston, wrist pin, connecting rod, crank pin. This will not be covered by warranty and will necessitate a very expensive repair. The best way to avoid this is to ALWAYS do the following:

  • Remove the pressure line from the muffler during fueling
  • Turn the engine over by hand without glow plug or spark plug power. Rotate the engine through a full 360 degrees by hand before using an electric starter. If you cannot rotate the engine by hand, do NOT use an electric starter. Drain excess fuel from the cylinder and try again.

 

 

9.17.7. Fuel Tank - Tubing - Bent or Straight

Question: Which models come with fuel tanks equipped with straight tubes?  

Answer: The three line safety stopper was introduced into production across the VMAR ARF line in mid 2004. The straight tubes were also phased in at that time. The tubes can be bent from straight or left as is depending on the application.

Kits introduced prior to mid 2004 may have Assembly and Operations Manuals showing the older two line tank with no safety stopper and bent tubes. The new tank, safety stopper and straight tubes have superceded the assembly shown.

9.17.8. Fuel Tank - What does "Safety Stopper mean?

Question: What does it mean in a VMAR model when I see the term "Safety Stopper"?

Answer: Beginning in mid 2004, the VMAR factory began a gradual change to a new 3 line tank with a metal overcap that aside from the convenience of a 3 line tank, helps prevent tank splitting due to overtightening of the stopper expansion bolt. The metal cap covers the end of the stopper like the older plastic disk units and also extends down and around the neck of the tank to prevent the stopper from being over compressed and splitting the tank. So, we call this new stopper and metal cap system "Safety Stopper" because it helps prevent the tank from splitting.

9.18. VMAR - Glow Power Conversions & Requirements
9.18.1. What do I need to convert a VMAR Electric model to Glow Power?

Question: What do I need to consider when converting one of the VMAR Electric ARF's to Glow Power?

Answer: VMAR Electric Models have retained the convention of providing a range of glow engine sizes in their name and description. Look on the box, on your invoice or in the operations manual and you will find a recommended engine range for your particular model.

Our Electric models come with a set (usually two) of power module firewalls that are drilled to fit the engine mounting studs. If you have two of these in your parts bag or on the fuselage you will use both of them. Glue them together using 30 minute epoxy so that the mounting stud holes line up. You will need a glow engine mount compatible with your engine. You will also need a small fuel tank such as the VMA-TANK100 (100cc... about 3.3 ounces) and fuel tubing appropriate to your type of fuel.

Mounting the engine is no different than any other model. See the articles included below for some helpful information on thrust lines and engine orientation. .  

Firewall - Thrust Lines - Where are they? Horizontal and Vertical

Question: I am installing my engine. Where are the thrust lines on the firewall?

Answer: The horizontal thrust line normally appears on the forward face of the firewall or you draw the horizontal thrust line on the forward face of the firewall yourself following location instructions contained in the documentation that came with your model.

If there is no horizontal line indicated on the firewall and you are unable to locate the location of the line in the reference material there is an easy way to position the horiztonal thrust line youself. To do this, fit your cowl over the fuselage. Look at the cowl from the left and right sides and adjust the vertical angle of the cowl to align with the fuselage. There should not be any sharp drop or rise in the silhouette profile of the fuselage as you move your eye along the fuselage and over the cowl. Once you have the cowl in place, look through the front hole where the crankshaft is going to protrude. Mark the horizontal thrust line on the firewall so that it is evenly located up and down with respect to the hole in the front of the cowl.

The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. If it is not shown, you can simply draw it into place. Make sure it is in the middle.

You may also find this information on our web site. Look for the links to your model, then the link to the detailed information and browse down to the engine section. The position of the horizontal and/or vertical thrust line may be stated there.

Engine Orientation - Upright, Sideways, Inverted - Relation to Position on FIrewall

Question: How do I position my engine on the engine mounts and on the firewall when I intend on installing the engine at an angle or inverted rather than upright?

Short Answer: Regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. There are a few exceptions as described below.

Better Answer: Some models pretty much force you to install your engine in an upright orientation. Other models, particularly once you move up from basic trainers, offer you a variety of engine orientation options. Rotated 90 degrees is one such choice that often works well with Pitts style mufflers...  inverted (sometimes called 180 degree rotation) is another choice. Generally these non-upright orientations, hide more of the engine and muffler and result in a more realistic scale like appearance to the model.

The choice of what angle to use is pretty much up to you, limited by the physical size of the engine, muffler, cowl etc. Some engines for example can be oriented at 90 or 135 degrees but run into a physical problem at other angles... they hit something, the muffler won't clear the fuselage, the needle valve is at an awkward location etc. When selecting an angle to mount your engine, you have to balance off appearance, convenience, practicality and most of all make sure it can physically fit. Don't forget to test your planned installation angle with the muffler and carb installed. Also check out your engine manual for any specific guidance from the engine manufacturer. Some manufacturers don't recommend an exactly inverted 180 degree installation. We have found this to be good advice in many cases... 180 degree inversions have a tendency to smother the glow plug in oil and residue if run at low RPM for too long.

Once you've decided on the installation orientation that you want, the actual position of the engine on the firewall is no different with a rotated engine than it is with an upright engine. The engine thrust is always centered around the crankshaft and regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. The horizontal thrust line is often drawn on the firewall or is to be draw on the firewall by you after referencing location information in the model instruction manual.  

There are some exceptions but the exceptions are few and far between... if the mounting face of the engine mounting lugs is offset from the center line of the crankshaft you have to adjust accordingly. This is rare, we have not seen this in standard two stroke engines. Engine manufacturers avoid this if at all possible. If you are working with a large gas engine adapted from another industry or a multi piston engine, examine the mounting system carefully and make sure you understand the relation between the engine mounting lugs and the center line of the crankshaft.

 

9.19. VMAR - Hardware & Fittings - General Information
9.19.1. Axles
9.19.1.1. Axles - What type of Axle do you use in VMAR ARF products?

Question: What type of axle do you use in VMAR ARF products?

Answer: We have used two main types of axles.

  • a) An axle that requires a wheel collar outboard of the wheel, and
  • b) An axle that does not require a wheel collar outboard of the wheel.

The latter is currently our standard axle and consists of a hardened machine bolt with a socket head and depending on the configuration, related fastening hardware such as retaining safety nut(s), washer(s) and in many cases one wheel collar. This axle has been found to be extremely strong, easy to install and most importantly, it is extremely resistant to vibration loosening of either the axle or the wheel.

9.19.2. Control Rods
9.19.2.1. Control Rods - Metal Studs - with 2mm threads

Question: What type of metal stud threads into the VMAR CNC metal clevis? Will imperial threaded rod work?

Answer: The VMAR CNC metal clevis is tapped for 2mm threaded studs. We make precision double ended 2mm studs in various lengths that work well with the VMAR CNC clevis and thread securely into VMAR inner plastic control rod. We have also found that our 2mm studs thread well into other brands of inner plastic rod as well, However we have not tested each and every alternative for compatibility with our 2mm threaded studs. Always test thorougly before and after flying... TUG TUG TUG!

 

9.19.2.2. Control Rods - Plastic with Splines

Question: What type of plastic control rods do you use? Are they splined or not?

Answer: We have used a variety of different plastic control rods since inception in 1999. From mid 2004 onwards we standardized on a new inner/outer plastic rod set. The rod set is of our own design. The inner rod is splined, the outer rod is not. The inner rod accepts our 2mm threaded metal studs and most other brand of studs. Always test for a secure joint when using threaded metal studs.

 

9.19.2.3. Control Rod System - Can it be Changed?

Question: I have my own favorite control rod system that I would to install on my VMAR ARF. Can the VMAR factory control rod system be changed?

Answer: Yes

Better Answer: Yes, we use a plastic or metal inner rod sliding in a plastic outer tube. The outer tube will accomodate the inner yellow splined plastic rod from Sullivan. The Sullivan inner rod will in turn accept threaded metal rods or studs which can engage with either plastic or metal clevises. To install your preferred system, simply remove the clevises or EZ connectors from the factory rods and gently pull the factory inner rods out of the fuselage. Then install your preferred system.

9.19.2.4. Control Rods - Wings - Too Short or Too Long

Question: When I install my wing servo for the ailerons and/or flaps and/or flaperons the control rod appears to be either too short or too long to connect with the control horns on the control surface. What should I do?

Answer: Estimate how much too long or too short the control rods appear to be. If it appears that the discrepancy is about 3/4" then you likely have the servos installed in the wing the wrong way around. Rotate the servo 180 degrees and check again. Most servos have the output shaft closer to one end than the other end and by rotating the servo you in effect change the required length of control rod by about 3/4".

9.19.3. Clevises
9.19.3.1. Clevis - Metal (CNC- Pin Diamater - Drill size for Servo Arm

Question: Should I drill out the holes in my servo arms and/control horns when using the new VMAR CNC produced metal clevis with 2mm screw pin?

Answer: VMAR control horns work with the clevis as is. It is not necessary to drill the horns. If you are using a non VMAR horn then we recommend drilling the hole to accomodate a 2mm screw pin. See below.

You will find it easier to insert the screw through the hole in the servo arms if you drill them out to 2mm first. It is possible to self tap your way through them using the screws but we don't recommend it.

For modelers with access to metric drill bits, use a 2mm drill bit. For modelers with access to imperial drill bits use a 5/64 inch drill bit. Keep in mind that 2mm is what you really want to use... 5/64" is a touch smaller than 2mm. For comparison purposes.

  • 2mm is .078740 in. 
  • 5/64" is .078125 in. which is 1.984 mm

If you are stuck and have neither a 2mm drill bit nor a 5/64" drill bit you can probably find a 1/16" drill bit. This is a bit small but will open up some of the very small holes in the arms of sub-micro servos enough so that with careful pressure you can self tap your way through the arm with the clevis screw. This is not ideal but 1/16" is better than trying to work the clevis screw through some of the very small pin holes in some of the servo arms we have seen on sub-micro servos. For comparison purposes here is some information on 1/16" drill bits.

  • 1/16" (4/64") .0625 in. which is 1.5875 mm
9.19.3.2. Clevises - What type is used in VMAR ARF products?

Question: What type of clevis do you use in VMAR ARF products?

Answer: We have used a number of different clevises.

  • a) A third party USA made clevis was used in 2000 and/or 2001
  • b) A plastic clevis with metal pin was used in 2002
  • c) A plastic clevis with screw pin was used in 2003
  • d) A third party metal clevis with metal pin was used in 2004
  • e) Our own CNC produced metal clevis with screw pin was introduced in mid 2004. This high quality solid metal CNC clevis is now standard in all production and used exclusively except for special applications requiring a plastic clevis. The CNC clevis is compatible with our own 2mm threaded studs and other precision 2mm threaded rods. In addition to superceding earlier clevises, the CNC metal clevis is also being used in most applications formerly requiring an EZ connector.
  • f) In early 2005, a new lightweight CNC metal clevis was developed and introduced into production for the L19 Bird Dog and other VMAR electric ARFS.  
9.19.4. Control Horn Assemblies
9.19.4.1. Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

9.19.4.2. Control Horn - Bevelled Washer - Orientation

Question: The bevelled washer that is a component of the control horn assembly can be oriented in two ways... either with the flat surface facing towards the bolt head or with the flat surface facing away from the bolt head. Which is correct?

Answer: Well in most cases it really does not matter. The main thing is to keep the bolt and lock washer hand snug so that nothing loosens up.

The assembly and operations manuals generally show the washer with the flat side of the washer towards the control surface and the tapered side of the washer facing towards the bolt head.

We actually prefer doing it the other way around so that the flat side of the washer is facing the towards the bolt head and the tapered side of the washer is facing towards the control surface. This helps self center the washer in the control horn hole thereby aligning the entire control horn at right angles to the control surface. This does NOT work well on smaller models with thin control surfaces. For thin control surfaces always have the flat side of the washer facing the control surface.

9.19.5. EZ Connectors - How to Install.
Question: How are the VMAR EZ Connectors Installed? 

Answer: This is a screw type EZ connector. It works in a similar manner to that of other manufacturers. Remove the set screw (larger) and beneath the set screw there is a small screw that passes like a shaft through the bottom of the EZ connector. Remove the nuts from the external threaded end of the small screw, thread the small screw through the hole in a control horn, steering arm or servo arm and fasten it in place with one or two of the small nuts. Now pass the control rod through the side holes in the EZ connector and lock the rod into place with the set screw. Apply thread locker to retain the set screw and the nut(s).

For pictures, modelers may wish to check their instruction manuals. There is a good collection of instruction manuals located on the support section of our web site. This can be accessed through the support button in our On-Line store or directly at http://www.richmondrc.com/support.htm . Some good pictures can be seen in the manual (PDF file) for the VMA-D260D Dornier DO27 on Page 4 (Figure 5.3) and on Page 5 (Figures 6.2 and 6.3)
9.19.6. Hinges
9.19.6.1. Hinges - Live - Ultratough and Flexible

Question: Do VMAR ARFS use so called one piece "Live" hinges or the two piece hinge with a metal pin holding them together?

Answer: We have used both in the past but since mid 2003 we have used one piece live hinges. We use a proprietary composite hinge material that has a textured surface and is very flexible, extremely strong and bonds well with CA or Epoxy.  Extensive testing and the experience of building 10's of thousands of ARFS using our live hinge material has confirmed that our live hinge allows us to give modelers a nice looking result that is simply the strongest in the industry.

 

9.19.6.2. Hinges - Pinned for Satety

Question: What do you mean by "pinned hinges"?

Answer: When we install the control surfaces using our proprietary composite live hinge material the hinges are glued into place using CA. Then we insert pins through the surfaces and right through both ends of the hinge itself. so that the hinge is trapped into place. The pin is then cut off flush with the surface and pressed further into the substrate. VMAR does this is at least for the hinges are each end of all control surfaces.

Question: What's the big deal? Why bother with this? Why are "pinned hinges" better than "un-pinned hinges"?

Answer: Most ARF manufacturers throw the control surfaces in the box, give you some rough and ready hinges and leave the job of hinging and installing the control surfaces to you. At VMAR we like to put more ARF in all our ARFS so we install your control surfaces at the factory. By using a super strong hinge, gluing it into place and pinning the hinge as well, we are reducing the chance that a control surface will come off in flight. As the builder and flyer of any model, you are responsible for all aspects of flight safety and integrity of the model no matter how much factory work has been done in advance... but we like to help you with this responsibility with a really good hinge, a really good hinge system and pins!

Remember... tug tug tug, test test test before and after each flight. If something is going wrong or loosening up or a sloppy fit is creeping into play, you want to find out on the ground... not in the air!

9.19.6.3. Hinges - Preinstalled Control Surfaces - Alignment & Gap

Question: Do VMAR ARF products come with the control surfaces pre-installed by the factory? Can I expect a clean hinging job and the correct hinge gap?

Answer: Yes Yes and Yes! We put more ARF in our ARFS than anyone in the business so we install the control surfaces for you. This is a real time saver and frankly, most people have trouble getting the control surfaces aligned in all three axis's and a hinge gap that is a gap not a GAP! We have a factory system for doing this and the system turns out a clean installation with consistently good alignment and just the right amount of hinge gap.

9.19.6.4. Hinges - Hinge Line Gap - Can it be reset?

Question: I want to increase the throws of my control surfaces. This requires increasing the hinge line gap. Can I do this?

Answer: Yes you can increase the hinge line gap to allow more movement of the control surfaces but you should NOT exceed the maximum recommended "throws" for your particular model.

Increasing the hinge line gap &/or exceeding the maximum recommended throws can lead to unpredictable results &/or control surface flutter and may result in loss of control and a crash.

If you are sure that you want to do this here is what to do:

  1. Cut the hinges (only the minimum required, don't cut hinges unless necessary) using a sharp #11 blade.
  2. Do not attempt to pull the hinge stubs out, they are glued and possibly pinned as well. Pulling the stubs out will make a heck of a mess. Trim the stubs down flush and leave the rest in place.
  3. Rehinge about 1/2" (12mm) over from the original hinge location.
  4. Use playing cards or other thin shim material to set the hinge gap.
  5. Apply hinge adhesive (Pacer Hinge Glue is recommended) and insert the hinges. Hold the control surface in place using low tack tape.
  6. Let the adhesive dry.
  7. Test the throws. Ensure the surface moves the way you want it to and that it does not exceed the maximum recommended throw.
  8. Pin at least the inboard and outboard hinges to ensure that the control surface cannot come loose even if the hinge glue lets go.
  9. Tug Tug Tug on the control surface. Make sure it is secure.
  10. Do Not Fly until you are sure that the control surface is securely attached and working properly.
9.19.7. Small Square Wood Blocks with Slots. What are they for?

Question: There are some small square wood blocks with slots in one side in my hardware pack. What are they for?

Answer: These are included with some of the VMAR ARF's as an extra item to be used if you wish to guide control rods at the servo end of the rod. They can be stacked or glued individually to the fuselage side with the slot "around" the rod to prevent the rod from flexing. With most installations they are no longer needed but if you find that the control rod flexes up or down you can trap the rod in the guide slots to limit the motion.

9.19.8. Spinners
9.19.8.1. Spinner - Collets - Plastic Rings on a Tree

Question: My VMAR ARF model came with a very complete set of Hardware & Accessories. I have one item that I am not sure about. Its a plastic "tree" with 8 rings on it. They look like they are intended to be a spacer or collet. What are they for?

Answer: These are collets for adapting VMAR spinners to various crankshaft diameters. Most VMAR ARF's now come with metal spinners that have a brass collett and generally do not require the plastic collets. But there may be some modelers who need to adapt a spinner to their crankshaft so we have included the 8 plastic rings (collets) with some models. In most cases they will not be required.

9.19.8.2. Spinners - Metal - Used on Most VMAR ARFS

Question: Does a spinner come with a VMAR ARF? Is the spinner plastic or metal?

Answer: With few exceptions (such as small electric and small glow engine ARF's) VMAR ARF's come with a spinner. Most of the lower price point products such as Trainers come with a good quality plastic spinner. Mid and higher end products and even some of the lower priced sport and fun fly products come with a VMAR metal spinner. Yes this is entirely metal. The back plate is either steel or aluminum and the cone is aluminum as is the mounting hardware with the exception of the steel center screw.

In the case of several of our Jets (prop), the metal spinner is sized and shaped for a scale look, for example the Mig21 has a pointed narrow spinner and the F4U Phantom has an elongated bullet like spinner.

 

9.19.8.3. Spinners - Plastic - Better Fit & Use of Socket Head Screws

Question: Has the VMAR plastic spinner been improved since it was first introduced in 1998?

Answer: Yes. In 1998-2000 the spinner did not have a good finsh and used Phillips head screws to retain the cone. In about 2000 (depending on size and color), we introduced hex head machine screws and redid all of the spinner molds to ensure a better fit and a cleaner finish.

As of 2005, these plastic spinners remain in use in our lower price point products including most VMAR Trainers.

9.19.9. Tail Wheel Assemblies
9.19.9.1. Tail Wheel Flange in Rudder - Hole Not Big Enough

Many of the VMAR Tail Dragger Models use a flange inserted into the bottom of the Rudder. This flange has a pipe like tube on one end. The tube has a plastic liner with a hole through it like a piece of air line tubing.

The Tail wheel assembly has a metal rod protruding from it. This rod is to go through the plastic liner of the Rudder Flange. In some cases either the rod is a bit too big in diameter or the hole in the plastic liner is a bit too small making it difficult to insert the metal rod into the plastic liner. Without inserting the rod into the plastic liner in the flange, the tail wheel will not steer when the rudder is turned.

Resolution:

Use a small drill bit and an electric drill to drill a larger hole through the
plastic liner. Or remove the plastic liner and install 1-2 layers of thin heat shrink tubing over the metal rod and then insert the shrink covered rod into the flange. It is important to maintain some form of plastic or insulating later between the metal rod and the metal flange to avoid radio noise caused by metal pieces vibrating against each other.

9.19.10. Wheels
9.19.10.1. Wheels - Metal Hub - Work Better, Look Better

Question: I have heard that VMAR has a new main and nose wheel with a metal hub. Do you mean looks like metal or for real metal? Just how many different styles of wheels have been used in VMAR ARF products?

Answer: Well, first of all, YES we have a new main and nose wheel with a metal  hub and YES it's real metal, not plastic painted to look like metal. More about the metal hub wheel shortly.

As to the different styles of wheel that we have had over the years: Beginning in about 96 or 97 we had a wheel that had a plastic hub and a square shouldered tire. We hated it... it was rather ugly, it was round in a sense, had too much run out in all axis, it worked OK on grass fields but was poor on pavement. At the time, the technology available to us was limited and this wheel was about the best that could be produced at our factory without huge increases in cost. Most modelers trashed these wheels and the wheels that came with most brands of ARFS at that time and installed their own favorite wheel.

In 2000 we introduced a new wheel with a better plastic hub and better rounded shoulder tires. It looked way way better, was more true to the concept that wheels should be round, had less run out and worked just fine on grass. Pavement was somewhat problematic if the wheel had any run out. Manufacturing cost was higher but manageable without a price increase to the end user. Anecdotal surveys of field use indicated that 80-90% of modelers with our trainers were using these wheels as is. Usage factors were lower in the intermediate, sport and scale categories.

In 2003 we began internal development of a new wheel that would have a better truer hub and help to reduce run out even more and work with round shouldered tires. A large number of sample sets were built and tested. In mid 2004 this wheel entered production and is the metal hub wheel that people are asking about. This wheel is significantly better than anything we had in the past, it works well on grass or pavement, is more consistent in production, looks good and lasts pretty much indefinitely. Prices to consumers purchasing VMAR ARF models did not increase with the introduction of the metal hub wheel. As of mid 2005, the metal hub main and nose wheel has been in production about a year. It is used on almost all models (some of the lower price point products were transitioned over last) and the supply chain is now generally flowing these new wheels into the market. Feedback to date indicates that this wheel is seldom discarded by the modeler. We expect and accept that scale modelers will continue to utilize high end after market replacements for stock wheels.

 

9.19.11. Why we use VMAR brand hardware in our ARF products.

Question: Why do you use VMAR brand hardware in VMAR ARF products?

Answer: Well, there a bunch of reasons. We are pretty flexible and have used alternatives with mixed results. Around 2000 we used an American source for plastic clevises. The quality was acceptable but we found that the metric sizing was not quite what we expected in the way of a match to our metric sized rods. Secondly we took a lot of flak from people who wanted a metal clevis and from everywhere outside the Americas market that wanted European or Japanese hardware. Lastly, there was confusion on the part of buyers who thought all of the hardware came from one Brand Name supplier when in fact it did not. We clearly stated this in our ads and on the box art but unfortunately some folks were confused anyway and complained loudly when they did not get the hardware that they thought they would be getting.

So... we made a decision to make our own hardware, all of it! This did the following for us:

  • Allowed us to design hardware that worked well for VMAR models. Our control horn is a good example. Our horn design was simple, easy to install, nearly fool proof and extremely reliable. We are still using it today and are flattered that other manufacturers are now making horns with a similar design.
  • Allowed us to control the metric to metric fit that we needed between our metal clevises, threaded studs and plastic inner (long) rods.
  • Ensured a steady reliable supply. There is nothing worse than having a thousand ARFS ready to ship except for some small piece of hardware coming from overseas.
  • Allowed us to avoid battles between us and modelers with rather strong opinions about the design and quality of various European, USA or Japanese hardware components.
  • Allowed us to control and steadily improve on the quality and change designs more readily. When you have access to CNC, presses and casting equipment you can pretty much make whatever you need whenever you need it. Our new three line safety stopper for our fuel tanks is a good example. With the metal overcap that wraps down the side of the tank neck, our safety stopper has greatly reduced the chances of modelers overtightening the cinch screw and expanding the stopper to the point that it splits the tank allowing fuel to leak everywhere. .
  • Allowed us to control costs and keep our ARF's priced right for todays market. Our universal servo tray is a good example, this tray is very compatible with all popular standard sized servos. Nobody else could supply us with a tray that worked well for Airtronics, Sanwa, Futaba, JR and HiTech. Each source had their own tray, some worked with other brands of servos, some did not... with our own tray we are good to go with pretty much any servo a modeler might have without having to raise the price of our product.
9.20. VMAR - Jet (Turbine) Power Conversions & Requirements

Question: I have a VMAR Jet (Prop) ARF model that runs great with a 2-stroke engine turning a prop in the nose but I would like to know if I could convert my VMAR model to use one of the Jet Turbines that are on the market?

Answer: In theory a very skilled modeller could possibly adapt a VMAR Jet (Prop) ARF to use a Jet Turbine for power. We do not recommend this as a viable conversion. This would be a great deal of work and likely would not lead to a workable solution and could result in a fire hazard or structural failure of the model or related components.

For those who are particularly determined to proceed along these lines in spite of all odds and in the face of our recommendation against such, given the all wood construction of VMAR Jet (Prop) ARF models, it may make more sense to use the VMAR fuselage as a male plug in order to make a mold for a new fibreglass fuselage with the same shape as the VMAR original fuselage. Then  it may be possible, with a great deal of effort, to safely incorporate the Jet Turbine into the new Fibreglass fuselage and adapt the remaining original VMAR components to mate with the new fibreglass fuselage.

Extensive testing will be required in order to validate the safety and integrity of any of the original VMAR Jet (Prop) ARF components for use in a model utilizing Jet Turbine power. No such testing has been done by VMAR or Richmond RC Supply Ltd. and we specifically again advise against such a conversion.

 

9.21. VMAR - Landing Gear - General Information
9.21.1. Landing Gear - Adjusting Height and/or Nose Up/Down Angle

Question: How do I adjust the nose up/down angle on my trike gear model?

Answer: Generally the nose gear can be adjusted slightly up and down so that the wing is near zero incidence (level) when the model is on the ground. If the nose is pointing up, the wing will be flying when the model is on the ground and you will tend to porpoise up and down when landing. If the nose is pointing down a high ground speed and excessive up elevator is often necessary to get the model to lift off.  

To adjust the nose up/down angle of the model when it is on the ground, you can do several different things or combine these things to get the desired result.

Lengthen the gear leg by loosening the set screw in the steering arm and pulling the gear downward or shorten the nose gear by pushing it upward slightly and then reseating the set screw.

AND/OR

A different nose wheel can be installed. Increasing the nose gear diameter by 1/2" will lift the nose approximately 1/4" higher with respect to the ground. So instead of a 2.5" wheel for example, try a 3" nose wheel. Do the reverse if you want to drop the nose lower towards the ground.

AND/OR

A different set of main gear wheels can be installed. Decreasing the main gear diameter by 1/2" will lower the center of model by approximately 1/4" with respect to the ground and at the same time reduce the degree of nose down attitude. So instead of a 3 " main wheels for example, try 2.5" main wheels. Do the reverse if you want to drop the nose lower towards the ground.

Note that by combining changes to both the nose wheel and the main wheels, a great deal of adjustment can be done to the nose up or down angle of the model when on the ground.

9.21.2. Landing Gear - Main - Wire Tight Fit into pre-drilled Holes

Question: I am about to install the main landing gear which is made from plated wire. Each gear "leg" is to be inserted into a pre-drilled hole in the bottom of the wing or fuselage and then aligned with a slot and clamped down with retaining straps. I find that it is difficult to insert the wire into the pre-drilled hole... either the wire is a touch too wide in diameter or the pre-drilled hole is a bit too narrow. Should I tap the gear legs into place with a small hammer or what?

Answer: If you can tap lightly and rotate the wire slightly to and fro a few times that will often work. If you find that it is a really tight fit and light tapping is not sufficient it would be best to take a few minutes and drill the hole out or grind the end of the wire.

Better Answer: Have a look at the wire first. Is there a burr or slight flairing at the end of the wire where it has been cut? If so, file the end to a slight taper. If the wire has no burrs or flairing at the end, the problem is likely that the wire is slightly oversized due to the plating and/or the pre-drilled hole has narrowed just a bit as the wood has dried after production. Either way, drill the hole out one size bigger. Here is how to do that... select a drill bit that is just large enough in diameter to barely fit into the hole without having to actually drill. Insert the drill into the hole and note how deep the hole is. Now select a drill bit that is 1/64" to 1/32" bigger in diameter. Apply masking tape to this drill bit to mark the depth of the hole. You don't want to overdrill the depth or you run the risk of drilling through a wing or other surface on the opposite side. Now use this larger drill bit to drill out one landing gear hole. Remember the idea is to increase the diameter of the hole slightly... not to drill deeper. Test fit the gear again. Then drill the second hole. Clamp the gear down with the retaining straps and screws.

If you ever end up with a hole that is too large and the gear has a loose or sloppy fit, turn the wing or fuselage so that the wheels are pointing up. Align the gear carefully so it is straight. Slide 1 or more narrow tooth picks into any slack space between the gear leg and the side of the hole. Flow CA+ such as ZAP-A-GAP CA+ from PACER down into the hole and around the tooth pick. Let the CA+ cure or accelerate with a light mist of ZIP KICKER. The gear should be nice and tight when you are finished.

9.21.3. Landing Gear - Main - Modification For Strength

Question: My landing gear appears to be made from aluminum or fiberglass. Is it possible to make it even stronger?

Answer: Yes. Please see the attached guidance for after market modification.   

9.21.4. Landing Gear - Nose - Alignment
Question: The nose gear on my VMAR model is steerable. I am having trouble aligning it so that it is centered (straight ahead) and so that I have some movement to both the left and right. What should I do?
 
Answer: Most VMAR models use a steering arm attached to a control rod and a servo. The steering arm is then slid over the nose gear wire or cylinder and locked into place with a set screw which engages with a flat spot that has been pre-positioned on the nose gear.
  
To resolve alignment problems:
 
1) Turn on your radio and center the servo that will move the nose gear.
 
2) Slide the steering arm into place on the nose gear, rotate the gear so that it points straight ahead. Cinch down the set screw. Check left and right movement. If you have more or less all the movement in just one direction, remove the wire gear and grind a new flat spot onto the wire at a location to allow the steering arm to engage with the wire and still rotate equally to both the left and right.
 
3) Remember that the amount of deflection to the left and right does not have to be large to enable nose steering. Slight left and right movement is all that is necessary.
 
4) In some cases, it may help to remove the steering arm and flip it over so that the distance between the firewall and the arm portion of the steering arm assembly is maximized. This stands the steering arm off from the firewall and enables the servo to "pull" more and hence turn the nose gear more before the arm contacts the firewall.
 
 
 
 
9.21.5. Landing Gear - Nose - Number of Wheel Collars

Question: My assembly manual has a picture showing one wheel collar holding the nose wheel in place and this matches the one collar found in the parts bag. However the manual mentions the use of two collars. What's the story here?

Answer: Depending on the model and the parts packing, there is always at least one wheel collar provided for retaining the nose wheel and only one wheel collar is required.

In some cases, we have also included an extra wheel collar in the parts bag in case of loss. Modelers can retain this extra collar in case they need it OR may wish to install the wheel collar on the nose gear axle inboard of the wheel itself.

9.21.6. Landing Gear - Oleo Struts
9.21.6.1. Simulated Plastic Oleos - Can I buy them separately?

Question: Many VMAR semi-scale models come with pre-installed landing gear struts. Can they be purchased separately?

Answer:  Yes they are available separately as an after market item. Best to call our order desk at 604-940-1066 or order on line. There are two sizes... roughly for 45 size and 90 size models. There are white or grey colored versions of both sizes. They are searchable on our web site as part numbers that begin with VMA-STR or search for "strut". They are sold as single sets for one gear leg at a time. Please have this information at hand if you are calling our order desk.

Please note that the plastic clamshell like struts are decorative only. The two halves wrap around the internal wire gear. They are not functional and do not bear weight.

9.21.6.2. Simulated Plastic Oleos - Appear to Be Cracked or Split

Question: My model came with simulated plastic oleo struts on some of the gear legs. They appear to be cracked or split. What should I do?

Answer: The simulated plastic oleo struts are a no-charge bonus item included with many of the scale and semi scale models. Even some of our high end trainers use these on the nose gear. Each simulated strut consists of two clamshell like plastic halves that "wrap around" the wire gear leg and are retained in place usually by a couple of small screws and a plastic ring and/or adhesive.

These struts are not functional, they are decorative only. Under load and/or during shipping the seams between the clamshell halves and/or the retaining ring can open up and expose a small gap along the seam. We suggest carefully tightening the screws again and regluing the clamshell halves and retaining ring back into place. Plasti-ZAP or ZAP-A-GAP from Pacer work well on this plastic.  

These simulated oleo struts are also available for purchase as a part. Please see the Replacement Parts section of our web store and search for "strut".

9.21.6.3. Simulated Plastic Oleo Struts - Can they be relocated to Retracts on Retract Ready Models?

Question: I have a VMAR model that comes with fixed landing gear and is considered retract ready so that I can install my own retracts at a later date. The fixed landing gear has simulated struts surrounding the wire gear legs. Can these simulated struts be moved to my retractable landing gear?

Answer: Quite likely yes but they may require some modification. There are large number of different retract systems and the only way to really be sure is to remove the simulated struts from the landing gear legs on your fixed gear and to trial fit them to the gear legs on your retracts. If they fit, then carefully confirm that the retract can operate freely with the simulated struts in place.

9.21.7. Landing Gear - Retracts - How to Install - Instructions.

Question: I have a VMAR ARF that is Retract Ready. Where do I get installation instructions for retracts?

Answer: The installation instructions for retracts are provided by the retract manufacturer. The procedure can be quite different from retract to retract depending on the brand and type. Please consult with the retract manufacturer for installation instructions.

9.21.8. Landing Gear - Retracts - In VMAR ARF's - Which Type?

Question: I have a VMAR ARF that is Retract Ready. What retracts do you recommend?

Answer: We actually don't recommend a particular brand of retracts. Modelers have their own preferences which vary dramatically from region to region. Some prefer a particular brand while others prefer mechanical or pnuematic (air). There is no "right" recommendation.
 
When we are designing mounting rail size and placement and bolt patterns etc we use Robart Pnuematic #ROB-605HD Main Gear, #ROB-607 Nose Gear and #ROB-188 Air Control Kit. (Please contact Robart to confirm suitability, size, bolt spacing, weight range, pricing and availability in your market area)
9.21.9. Landing Gear - Trike vs Tail Dragger - Whats what? What works Best?

Question: What is the difference between Trike and Tail Dragger landing gear?

Short Answer: Trike models have a nose wheel and two main wheels. Tail dragger models have two main wheels and a tail wheel or tail skid.

Better Answer: Trike is slang for TRI-cycle... TRIke gear uses 3 wheels and looks much like the front and two main wheels of a kids tricycle... hence the name Trike Gear. Think of a kids tricycle and you know what it looks like. The front wheel does the steering.

Tail Dragger is a slang term for aircraft that do not have a nose wheel. Tail draggers have main landing gear and a tail skid or tail wheel. Generally we think of Tail Draggers having only the two main wheels but in fact they may have a small tail wheel as well. On some models the small tail wheel is coupled to the rudder so that the airplane can be steered left and right more easily when it is taxiing on the ground.

In general, and there are lots of exceptions... trainers have a high wing and trike gear. Most beginners who are learning with a trainer and many other RC flyers find trike models easier to steer on the ground provided the runway is smooth and the grass is not long. For rough fields or runways with coarse gravel or longer grass, trike gear can be a problem and tail draggers work better. Some trainers and lots of sport and scale airplanes are tail draggers. Some trainers give you a choice... trike or tail dragger... the VMAR Apache for example offers both configurations with all the parts in the box for either set up.

9.21.10. Landing Gear - Wheels - Diameter - Is it OK to change from stock?

Question: Is it OK to change to smaller or larger diameter wheels? Any tips on this?

Answer: Depending on the model, the stock wheel diameter has been chosen to work well on asphalt, packed sand/dirt /&or close cropped grass. Yes it is OK to change the diameter of the wheels provided that you maintain the same angle of incidence when sitting on the ground... i.e. if you change the diameter of the mains you must change the diameter of the nose or tail wheel by the same amount and vice versa.

Here are some tips:

  1. The angle of incidence on the ground should be the same as that provided by the stock wheels to ensure that the model has the correct angle of attack when making its take off run and when landing. i.e. if you change the mains by X inches in diameter, make sure you change the diameter of the nose or tail wheel by the same amount and vice versa.
  2. If you are always flying from smooth asphalt, concrete, clay or other very hard surface, you can reduce the wheel size slightly provided that you retain sufficient prop tip clearance from the ground. You may have to opt for a smaller diameter prop with a larger pitch or more blades to sustain sufficient ground clearance for the prop.
  3. If you are flying from packed dirt, fine gravel, sand, sandy soil or closely cropped grass, the stock wheel size is probably best unless you have some particular need to change the wheels.
  4. If you are flying from a grass field where the grass is quite long and/or the turf is soft or spongy or variable in "hardness" you may need to go to larger diameter wheels to get consistent ground handling and stability. If your model appears to be bogging down on take off, failing to run out smoothly upon landing or is hard to taxi in a straight line try increasing the diameter of the wheels in .25" increments. Use lightweight wheels and test as you increase the diameter in .25" steps. Generally trike gear will require larger diameter wheels in these conditions than tail draggers due to drag on the nose gear wire/axle.

 

9.21.11. Landing Gear - Wire vs Fibreglass vs Aluminum - Whats what? What works best?

Question: What is the difference between landing gear made of wire vs that made of fibreglass or aluminum?

Short Answer: Wire gear is OK for just about any model particularly low wing models with short landing gear legs. When the landing gear legs are longer such as on a high wing trainer or sport tail dragger, fibreglass or aluminum is best. We are now using 7075 T6 aluminum on many models because it is as strong or stronger than fibreglass gear and much lighter.  

Better Answer: When wire gear is used it tends to bend easily if long and on an angle. This can actually be a help when training because the bending sucks up some of energy associated with a hard landing. Re-bending wire back into shape quickly becomes tedious in spite of it's low cost and energy tolerant attributes. So for example on our Discovery, Challenger and Hornet trainers where entry price is critical we use wire gear and offer stronger gear as an aftermarket upgrade. On the slightly higher priced Apache we include heavier duty gear made from either fibreglass or 7075 T6 aluminum. Both are exceptionally strong but aluminum is now favoured due to a lighter weight. Softer grade T6 or non-T6 aluminum does not stand up well in service. Beginning in the second half of 2003 we began changing most of our sport and semi-scale models that had fibreglass main gear over to 7075 T6 Aluminum. We continue to use Fibreglass when the leg length is very long such as the 120 Size Beaver.

 

 

9.21.12. Landing Gear - Wire Coil Direction - Which is Right?

Question: My model has landing gear made of wire. The wire has a shock coil just below the fuselage. There are two ways to install this gear. Which is correct?

Answer: The landing gear should be installed so that the coil winds up (tightens) when the landing gear contacts the ground. There are a few exceptions for reasons of scale appearance and/or softening the shock of landing but these are rare.

9.21.13. Landing Gear - Wire Coil or Not? Which is right?

Question: If the picture in my instruction book shows a wire coil and my landing gear does not have a wire coil or vice versa... if the instruction book shows no wire coil and my landing gear has a wire coil... do I have the correct landing gear wire set for my model?

Answer: Most of the time yes. If the landing gear fits into the slots and accomodates the wheels and results in the correct ground height for your model you are going to be OK to use the landing gear provided with or without a coil in the gear.

Better Answer: The instruction books are laid up early in the production cycle of a model. At times we change the gear to add or remove a coil depending on what we learn from users. Ideally we would have it right from the get go but if we find that a landing gear is too "springy" in operational use, we take the coil out in the next run. Conversely if we find that the gear is too stiff in operational use, we add a coil in the next run. Either way, the main thing is that the gear fit correctly into the mounting slots and provide the correct ground height for your model when using the wheels provided.

9.22. VMAR - Information related to Packaging
9.22.1. VMAR - Packaged to Survive - What we do.

Question: How does VMAR package ARF's so that they have the best possible chance of arriving in one piece after weathering the hazards of todays shipping systems?

Answer: Good question. No matter what we do, there is a chance that someone will drop a V8 Engine or a box of 400 bricks on a shipment and crush or damage something. We don't run UPS, FedEX, DHL or any other shipping outfit but we work closely with them when designing our packaging and shipping boxes.

In summary:

  • Each component is individully bagged to keep it clean and reduce scuffing
  • Each bag is then secured between dividers and/or taped down inside the display box.
  • Double decker display boxes have internal bulkheads and single layer display boxes have multi-ply dividers
  • The entire display box is then closed off with a lid and inserted into a plastic bag to protect the label against scuffing and to protect against water damage in transit
  • The bagged display box is then inserted into an outer shipping box.(may not apply in markets outside the Americas)
  • 2mm plywood shields are then inserted on both wide sides between the bagged display box and the outer shipping box to add even more resistance to crushing. (Americas market only)
  • All in all, nobody in the ARF industry makes the kind of effort we do to ensure that a VMAR ARF arrives in the hands of the end user in perfect condition.
9.22.2. VMAR - Wood Spacer in the Slot for the Horizontal Stabilizer.

Question: My VMAR ARF model has a small wooden block near the aft end of the slot for the horizontal stabilizer. What is this for?

Answer: This is a spacer and retainer that has been tack glued into place to provide extra strength during shipment of the model. The wood spacer/retainer should be removed with a sharp hobby knife just prior to the trial fitting of the horizontal stabilizer.

9.23. VMAR - Parts Information
9.23.1. VMAR - Parts - Availability - Where can I get?

Question: How can I get parts for my VMAR ARF?

Answer: Parts are available through your Hobby Retailer or direct from Richmond RC.

In either case, in order to get what you need, you should know:

  • What model you have and what it's color is.
  • The part number of the item you are looking for.

To locate a parts list complete with descriptions, part numbers and typical retail prices please do this:

This site also allows you to order the parts you need directly on line.

9.23.2. VMAR - Wings, Stabilizers, Fuselages etc... are they Covered or not?

Question: I need a wing for my VMAR ARF? Does it come covered?

Answer: Yes. When you purchase a VMAR factory part such as a fuselage, wing or stabilizer it comes with the factory covering already applied.

9.24. VMAR - Servo Trays - General Information
9.25. VMAR - Specifications of Models - Where can I find them?

Question: Where are the specifications for the various VMAR ARF products?

Answer: Please visit www.richmondrc.com

9.26. VMAR - Wings - General Information

 

9.26.1. Wing - Ailerons Loose on Torque Rods - How to Tighten

Question: The ailerons on my VMAR ARF are activated by torque rods running from the center of the wing. The torque rods are a bit sloppy where they enter the aileron. I am not sure if they were like this from the get go or if this arose after flying for a while. How can I fix this?

Answer: Fill the slack space around the torque rods where they enter the ailerons using Medium or Thick CA.

Better Answer: Hold the wing so that the ailerons are pointing with their leading edge facing upwards and deflect the ailerons one at a time so that the hinge line is clearly visible. Apply ZAP-A-GAP Medium CA or SLO-ZAP thick CA down into the torque rod holes in the aileron leading edge. Apply a small amount of ZIP KICKER accelerator and then more CA until the hole is solidly filled with CA. Let cure thoroughly. Test to ensure there is no remaining slop before flying.

9.26.2. Wing - Aileron Torque Rod angle different between wing halves - How do I fix?

Question: I have noticed that the aileron torque rods to which the control horns are attached protrude from the left and right wings at different angles when the ailerons are neutral. Is this a problem? If so, how do I fix it?

Answer: Ideally the aileron torque rods should be in-sync angle wise when the ailerons are at a neutral position. In practise they may be at slightly different angles and in all but the most exacting requirements (FAI pattern flying for example), a slight variation in angle will not have any noticeable effect.

If however, the angle of the aileron torque rod does not allow for full deflection of the aileron both up and down as per the maximum allowable deflection stated in the operations manual for your model then this should be fixed before flying.

How does this happen? The aileron torque rods are bent and installed at the factory and they have the same angle at that point. The most common cause is compression and bending during shipping. The aileron torque rods are shipped with covers holding the ailerons and aileron torque rods in place but if a large heavy object is placed on the box so that it compresses the wing, the aileron torque rod maybend with no other damage to the wing or the rod will not bend but will compress the wood surrounding the rod in the aileron resulting in a sloppy and off-angle fit. The rods are also subject to bending or otherwise acquiring unequal angles when in a crash or if they are impacted or snagged during transport of the wing.

How do I fix it? There are a number of ways to resolve this... none of them are difficult... if you don't feel comfortable on your own, talk to an experienced modeler and ask them to give you a hand. An experienced modeler will be able to resolve this in minutes. Here are two recommended approaches.

Do either a) or b) and then c) or do a) and b) and then c). In all cases do a) and c). In extreme cases do b).

a) Bend the aileron torque rod without removing the aileron: This should be tried first and will work most of the time. Take two wooden rulers or paint stir sticks and clamp the aileron in its neutral position. Place one ruler on each side of the aileron (above and below) with about three inches (75mm) overlapping the center section of the wing in the wing saddle area. Clamp these retainers in place with a couple of C clamps or other suitable clamping device. Apply one C clamp directly over the location where the torque rod enters the aileron. The main thing is that the aileron be at it's neutral position. Now bend the aileron torque rod that protrudes from the wing so that the angle of the aileron torque rod is similar to the aileron torque rod in the other wing presuming that the other wing is a good reference. If both wings require work, then bend the aileron torque rods in both wings until they are approximately perpendicular (90 degrees) with respect to their respective wing surface. Don't sweat it if the angle is not 90 degrees...  focus on getting the angles similar for both wings and ensuring that the ailerons can be moved fully to their maximum recommended deflection. 

OR

b) Bend the aileron torque rod after removing the aileron. Removing an aileron is not a big deal but why bother if you can fix the problem using method a) outlined above. However, assuming that you have tried method a) and it did not work for you, then here is the ultimate solution. Use a sharp #11 blade and cut the hinges holding the aileron in place. Cut the hinges... do not remove them! Now wiggle the aileron up and down at the wing tip end while gently pulling it back and away from the wing trailing edge. When the aileron has been removed you will have both ends of the aileron torque rod exposed. Bend the rod to align properly with the other wing or so that the aileron will at neutral when the other end of the rod is approximatley perpendicular (90 degrees) with respect to the wing surface. Use the #11 blade to trim the old hinge stubs down flush. Do NOT pull the old hinges out. Re-hinge the aileron by placing new hinges beside the old hinges and re-install the aileron.

AND THEN

c) Toughen up the wood in the aileron around the aileron torque rod and fill in any voids. Now that the aileron torque rod(s) has been bent to the correct angle and the ailerons can be moved to their maximum recommended deflection, it is time to wick some thin CA such as ZAP/CA and then some medium CA+ such as ZAP-A-GAP down into the hole in the aileron that surrounds the aileron torque rod. Hold the aileron so that the hinge line is above the aileron. Deflect the wing about 20-30 degrees so that the aileron remains upright with the hinge line up and you can see the aileron torque rod entering the aileron. Wick thin CA into the hole in the aileron that surrounds the aileron torque rod. Do this several times. The thin CA will wick into the soft wood around the rod and make the wood much harder and durable. After the thin CA has cured, apply medium CA+ into the hole in the aileron. Whereas the thin CA was intended to toughen up the surrounding wood, the medium CA+ is intended to fill any voids left over in the hole between the aileron torque rod and the aileron itself. Let the CA+ cure or accelerate with ZIP KICKER. When dry, try flexing the aileron via the control rod. There should be no slop in the movement.

That's it! A bit difficult to describe but easy to do!

 

 

 

9.26.3. Wing Alignment Dowels - Tight Fit - Can I Adjust the Fit?

Question: Can I adjust the position of the alignment dowel holes in the wing roots? I find that the dowels are a bit tight or out of position when trying to join the wing halves together.

Answer: Yes.

Better Answer: Yes. Here is some information and a procedure that you may find helpful to review first.

The alignment dowels are the short (approx 1/4 x 1 inch) wooden dowels used with the wing spar joiner when joining the wing halves.

Taper the alignment dowel ends with a knife or sandpaper. Do NOT modify the dowel center section, just taper the ends. Insert the wing spar joiner. Now try fitting the wing together again. If the wings now fit together well then separate the wings and spar joiner and continue with the wing joining procedure outlined in your instruction book using plenty of 30 Minute Epoxy on all of the components.  

If you find that the fit is still tight then try the following: Separate the wing halves. Remove the alignment dowels. Insert the spar joiner and join the wing halves. If the joiner fits and the wings line up well, then you can adjust the location or size or shape of the alignment dowel holes slightly. Separate the wings again. Remove the dowels and taper the ends but not the main center section of each dowel. Insert one alignment dowel in the forward hole of the left wing. Glue the dowel into the forward hole of the left wing with CA glue. Join the wings and check where the dowel contacts the opposite right wing root. Separate the wings, elongate the forward hole in the right wing root to better line up with the dowel. Work in small steps. Elongate the hole slightly and then check again. Repeat this process in small steps. At some point the hole will accomodate the dowel. Make sure the wing roots can now be joined.

Separate the wing halves again. Insert the second dowel in the aft hole of the right wing. Glue the dowel into the aft hole of the right wing with CA glue. Join the wings and check where the dowel contacts the opposite left wing root. Separate the wings, elongate the aft hole in the left wing root to better line up with the dowel. Work in small steps. Elongate the hole slightly and then check again. Repeat this process in small steps. At some point the hole will accomodate the dowel. Make sure the wing roots can now be joined.

Separate the wing halves and spar joiner and then follow the wing joining procedure outlined in your instruction book using plenty of 30 Minute Epoxy on all of the components.

9.26.4. Wing Bolts Broken - Background and Tips to Avoid

We have had several questions about wing bolts, do they break, what happens if they break etc.

The wing bolts are extremely strong. Longitudinal load such as that induced by a wing in flight (lift or descent) will not break the wing bolts. Only shear either horizontally (crash damage) or by twisting the bolts under high load will break or weaken the bolts. In order to break the bolts they must be excessively overtightend using either a nut driver, electric drill with socket or a battery operated electric screw driver. Cross threading the bolts into the wing bolt block inserts will strip the bolts and or the wing bolt block inserts.

Our strong recommendation is to tighten snugly only using hand tools. Do not overtighten. Do not use a power tool of any sort. When using a hand tool, tighten until the wing is seated in the wing saddle of the fuselage and then snug down about 1/8 turn more. That is all that is required. If you hold the fuselage in your hand near where the bolts engage the wing bolt blocks in the fuselage you will feel the fuselage sides between to warp inwards just inboard from the wing bolt blocks if you overtighten the bolts. If you feel the fuselage sides begin to warp or see the wing bolt heads beginning to sink into the bottom of the recesses in the wing, you are too tight. Back off on the tension on the bolts. If you persist in overtightening the bolts, you will strip or shear them off or pull out the mounting blocks or in some cases pull the head of the bolt right through the wing! All of these situations can lead to wing damage, fuselage damage and/or wing separation from the fuselage in flight.

Cross threading the bolts into the wing bolt block inserts will damage both the bolts and the inserts. If you persist in forcing the wing bolt in spite of the cross threading, you can damage the threads beyond repair and/or over stress the wing bolt.

Check the bolts before and after each time you install the wing. If the bolts look stripped, replace them. If the bolts appear to bind or require a great deal of torque to tighten them, lubricate the bolts with light oil and make sure they are not cross threaded. If you have any concerns that the bolts may have been damaged due to overtightening, cross threading or crash damage, change the bolts and check the wing bolt mounting blocks and inserts in the fuselage to make sure the blocks are secure and the inserts have a good thread. Do NOT fly without checking the wing bolts, handtightening them and making sure the wing is secure. Mounting blocks and bolts can be damaged by overtightening or crashes and may not be obviously loose upon cursory inspection. Check carefully and remove the wing after any crash so that you may examine the wing bolts and the mounting blocks carefully.

9.26.5. Wing Bolts Broken - Will not Thread into Fuselage T-Nuts

Question: I am having trouble threading my wing bolts through the wing into the T-nuts installed in the fuselage. I think there might be some epoxy in the T-nut threads. What should I do?

Answer: Try to thread the wing bolts into the T-nuts without the wing.

If the wing bolts thread into the T-nuts OK without the wing them the T-nuts are fine and you probably are not seating the wing firmly against the former before trying to thread the bolts into the T-nuts.

If the wing bolts will NOT thread into the T-nuts without the wing, the T-nut threads are either plugged with something like epoxy or have been stripped out. They will need to be replaced.

9.26.6. Wing - Dihedral - What is It? Is it Adjustable?

Question: What is Wing Dihedral? Is it Adjustable on a VMAR ARF aircraft?

Answer: Dihedral is the bend upwards at the center of the wing. When you look at a wing with dihedral when it is top side up, the wing tips will be higher than the center. The more dihedral the higher the tips. Dihedral provides stability so trainers usually have more than sport airplanes and pattern or aerobatic airplanes often have none at all.

The dihedral on VMAR models is set at the factory. There is nothing to adjust. The angle of the wing roots and the angle of the wing spar joiner ensure that when the wing is assembled properly using 30 minute epoxy, the wing roots will be flush to each other and the correct amount of dihedral will be built into the wing.

9.26.7. Wing - Gaskets and Fairings - What are they For?

Question: I have found what looks like a foam sheet in the shape of a wing rib in my kit. My friend has another VMAR ARF and it has a black plactic component that also looks like a wing rib. What are these for?

Answer: These parts help seal and fit the wing root to the side of the fuselage.

Better Answer: The pre-cut foam is a gasket that can be attached to the wing root of your wing and serves as a sealing and protective gasket between the wing root and the side of the fuselage. Use silicone or latex contact cement to attach the gasket to the wing root.

The pre-molded plastic piece is a fairing that can be cut and attached to the wing root to serve as a finishing piece to enhance the appearance of the wing root to fuselage fit. This is used on fuselages that have a considerable taper or curve to them.

9.26.8. Wing Joints - Do it Right the First Time.

Question: A friend of mind had his wings break in half during flight. I don't want this to happen to me. How do I make sure that I do a good job when joining the wing halves of my ARF?

Answer: Use 30 Minute Epoxy and don't overpower your model.

Better Answer: Wing strength is critical to the integrity of an aircraft and we do extensive testing to make sure that the design is strong and solid. Wing failure is not something that we see or hear a lot of . We have analysed a few wing failures  sent to us for review by consumers and in all cases we found that improper assembly and use of adhesives was the cause of the failure. Do a dry assembly first with no adhesive while following the procedures listed in the instruction manual. This will ensure that the parts fit well and that you are familiar with what goes where and how to install it. When you are ready for the final assembly with adhesive, use 30 Minute Epoxy only and use plenty of it. Secondly do not overpower your model. See below for some more information that you may find helpful.

 

Epoxy - Slow Cure vs Fast Cure - Which is Best?

Question: Epoxy is available in different cure speeds. Should I use a Slow Cure (30 Minute) or a Fast Cure (5 Minute) Epoxy?

Short Answer: Use 30 Minute Epoxy where strength and structural integrity is important such as when joining wings or mounting stabilizers, engine firewalls etc. Use Fast Cure for quick repairs of small non-critical components or joints. If in doubt, always use 30 Minute Epoxy.

Better Answer: There are two general factors to consider,  Bond Strength and Working Time. 30 Minute Epoxy creates a stronger bond and it gives you more time to work. 5 Minute Epoxy gives a good bond but it is not as strong as 30 Minute Epoxy and it must be used very quickly, particulary in warm conditions.

The Bond Strength is pretty straighforward... 30 Minute simply gives stronger bonds. Use 30 Minute when joining wings, installing stabilizers, engine firewalls or other load bearing critical structural components that you simply cannot afford to have come off or fail. Use 5 Minute Epoxy for quick minor repairs of non-load bearing or light load bearing less critical components.

The Working Time is something that modelers frequently overlook and tend to err a bit in favor of  "fast is good". In some cases, like a quick repair of a simple small component... fast is really nice! But in cases where the amount of adhesive is considerable, the components are large or complex and/or need to be simultaneously mated with other parts.... you need to allow for plenty of time to work in order to get the parts aligned and properly placed. It is very important that the Epoxy is fully "wet" when being used. If Epoxy starts to thicken at all before the parts are joined, the Epoxy will not produce a good bond.

The worst possible scenario is using 5 Minute Epoxy on a complex multi-piece job like joining a wing. We have had too many calls from people who end up with the Epoxy beginning to cure before the wing halves are properly joined. We have also seen wing joints after in flight failures caused by gummy thick half cured Epoxy not penetrating and filling the joint and component substrates properly.

If you have any doubts about the complexity of a job, need for strength, working time etc, always use 30 Minute Epoxy!

Engine Power - What is Appropriate? How Much is Too Much?

Question: How much engine power is appropriate? Many models give a range of engine sizes... should I use an engine that is at the bottom of the range or go for broke and use the biggest engine recommended?

Answer: If in doubt go with something that is more or less in the middle of the range unless the distributor or your dealer have some specific recommendations.

DO NOT use an engine larger than the maximum size recommended by the model manufacturer. You run the risk of overstressing the airframe which can lead to sudden breakup of the model in the air and may injure someone.

Better Answer: Generally manufacturers specify a range of engine sizes for a model. An engine in the middle usually works well but you might want to consider going with the higher end of the range if you are going to be flying at altitudes above 2000 feet or in very hot weather or flying off of floats. Naturally if you are doing all of these, flying at high altitudes from a lake on a hot day... the bigger engine is the better choice. You might also want to ask around in your area to see what other RC flyers are doing. Be a bit cautious of the "power at all costs" type of recommendations but listen carefully when you get advice from those who have thought it through and tried it out.

 

9.26.9. Wing Joint Tape - How do I use this?

Question: I found a small roll of what looks like Covering material. What is this for and how do I use it?

Answer: This is for sealing the joint after the wings have been epoxied and joined together. Peel the backing off and apply it to the joint.

Better Answer: This is a long narrow strip of self adhesive tape with a removeable peel off backing. It may be colored to match the center section of the wing but is generally clear in color to enable it to be used universally with any graphics or color scheme. Some modelers may confuse the clear material for the white of the peel off backing material. The self-adhesive side is applied so that it seals the wing center joint.

Unroll it and plan your work according to your instruction manual. In the absence of specific instructions in your manual, start on the fuselage side of the wing and work from back to front. Peal off about 4-6 inches of the backing at a time and carefully apply the sticky side evenly astride the joint. Work to the trailing edge on the fuselage side of the wing and carefully continue over to the non-fuselage side of the wing and back around to the leading edge and over to the top side of the wing to where you started. Firmly apply pressure to the tape so that it sticks to the wing.

9.26.10. Wing Saddle Fit

Problem/Question: When mounting the wing to the fuselage of a VMAR model, the wooden dowels in the wing key into the receiving holes in the fuselage former OK but when I try to push the wing onto the wing saddle, there is considerable resistance and back pressure. I can't easily seat the wing at the back edge and it almost appears as if the wing saddle is the wrong shape for this wing. What causes this and what should I do?

Solution/Answer: This is quite easy to put right. In some cases the dowels in the wing or the holes in the fuselage are not lined up quite right or the holes in the fuselage former are a bit too low. The wing saddle will be the correct shape, but some adjusting of the holes in the fuselage former is needed in order to better seat the wing.

First things first... DO NOT modify or reposition the dowels in the wing. Instead, modify the holes in the fuselage former slightly by elongating the holes higher towards the top of the fuselage. Do the adjustments in small steps with frequent tests. Use a small round file. You will gradually elongate the holes into more of an elliptical shape (egg shaped). After each small adjustment, test the the wing fit again. You will find that it will be easier to press the rear of the wing towards the saddle as you make the adjustments. When the wing seats properly in the saddle, you are done. Remember, it is easy to do BUT do it in small steps rather than all at once.

9.26.11. Wing Spar Joiner - Fit - Tight vs Loose vs Too Long etc

Question: Can I modify the shape of Wing Spar Joiner to provide a better fit in my particular wing?

Answer: Yes with cautions. See Below

Better Answer: The Wing Spar Joiner is a very important component. Looks simple, is simple... but the most vital piece in the entire wing.

Yes you can modify the shape of the wing spar joiner if you really have to provided that you strictly pay attention to the following cautions:

1) Do you really have to? Understand what you are doing and why.

2) By how much? Sanding a corner that binds or reducing the thickness a couple of thousands of an inch at each end to assist with insertion or trimming the overall length by 1/8" or so is one thing... but doing anything more than that requires careful consideration. If you require big changes, make sure that something else is not wrong.

3) Remember LOTS of 30 Minute Epoxy must be used when gluing the wing spar joiner and wing roots together. LOTS, fill up the entire cavity and cover all surfaces and the wing roots thoroughly. Never use 5 minute or 15 minute Epoxy for joining wings... 30 Minute Epoxy only. Lots of it!

4) Never score or mar the surface of the wing spar joiner with a knife, scribe, vice grip teeth, plier teeth or meat tenderizer. Each time you indent the surface of the wing spar joiner you create a risk of a stress fracture later. If you want to roughen up the surface a bit, use 80 grit sand paper and blow away the dust before glueing into place.

5) If you want to make the vertical dimension of your wing spar joiner thicker (i.e. in the dimension that lies from the top to the bottom of the wing) you can use 1-16-3/16 thick balsa or other strip wood if you prefer to eliminate any gap in the fit. Any gap in the fit is normally found only on trainers where we use a wing spar joiner for several different models each with a different degree of dihedral. By making the wing spar joiner a bit narrow, we can vary the dihedral a few degrees between models.  Adding strip material to fill the gap is fine as long as you can flush fit the wing roots of your wing with the spar joiner inserted AND as long as you can still insert plenty of 30 Minute Epoxy into the joiner cavities in the wing.

 

9.26.11.1. Wing - Spar Joiner Cavity - Blocked at Wing Root End

Question: I have a VMAR ARF model. I notice that the cavity for the Wing Spar Joiner is blocked at the wing root end of one wing panel. It appears to be blocked by wood. Can I fix this?

Answer: Yes. The wings on some of the models are produced in one piece and then cut into two halves. What you are seeing is a very thin skin of balsa covering the wing cavity entrance. Use a sharp #11 blade to carefully cut away the thin skin of balsa from the cavity entrance.

9.26.12. Wing Tubes in Plug In Wing - Loose Fit - How to Tighten Up

Question: I have an Extra 330L and I find that one of the plug in wing panels is slightly loose on one of the wing tubes. Is this a problem? How can I tighten this up a but.

Answer: Actually this answer applies to pretty much any of our models that have plug in wings and aluminum wing tubes. If you want a tighter fit, we suggest inserting the tubes through the fuselage and then applying a small piece of heat shrink tubing around the end and mid point of the wing tube that is loose. This will increase the diameter of the tube slightly and you can adjust the thickness of tube by adding additional heat shrink layers if you wish. Or if you are short on shrink, vinyl like MacTac or even black vinyl electricians tape works well.

If you want to do this to both sides of the wing tubes to accomodate both plug in wing panels, you will have to consider the following:

a) You can increase the diameter of both ends (but not the middle) of the tube and leave it in place in the fuselage, or

b) You can increase the diameter of the entire tube (shrink works well for this) and ream out the fuselage holes carefully ( a round sanding stick works best for this) to accomodate the bigger tube. This way the tube will be removeable as before, or

c) Remove the tape or shrink from one side of the tube at the end of the day and slide the tube out as per usual. You would then have to re-apply the tape or shrink next time.

9.26.13. Wing Tubes in Plug In Wing - Should they be Glued or Not?

Question: I have a VMAR model with plug in wings. Should I glue the aluminum spar joiner tubes into the fuselage or not?

Answer: With very few exceptions, VMAR models that utilize plug in wings have wing channels for the spar joiner tubes that are closed at the outboard ends to prevent the spar joiner tubes from "creeping" further into either wing during flight.
 
We recommend confirming that your wing joiner tubes are restricted from moving overly far into either wing panel. Provided that the wing tubes are limited in their motion and cannot come out of the opposite wing during flight, there is no need to glue or otherwise secure the wing joiner tubes to the fuselage.
 
If you wish to leave the wing joiner tubes to the fuselage for convenience or for ease of assembly or for purposes of transport or storage, you may wish to "tack" the tubes into the fuselage using a small amount of medium CA+ such as Zap-A-Gap applied from inside the fuselage. Just a small amount of CA+ is required.
9.26.14. Wings - The wing tips hang down (droop) when the wing is mounted on the fuselage

We occasionally (but still too often) get inquiries from modelers who are concerned that their wing tips appear to hang lower than the centre section of the wing when the wing is mounted on the fuselage.

Resolution:

In Brief: Check the instructions, pictures, illustrations, box art and all documentation to ensure that the wing has been assembled right way up. If the wing has been assembled upside down, a new wing will be required.

In Detail: Most real aircraft and most models have wing tips that are slightly higher than the centre section of the wing when the wing is mounted on the fuselage. This is called Dihedral and is a part of the design. Dihedral helps with stabilty and Dihedral is used on most trainers and many scale models of real aircraft. Some models are designed for aerobatics and will have a very small amount of Dihedral or may have none at all... they will have wing tips that are more or less even with the height of the centre section of the wing when the wing is mounted on the fuselage. In rare cases full size aircraft will have the wing tips hanging lower (drooping) than the centre section of the wing when the wing is mounted on the fuselage. This is called Anhedral... it is rare in full size aircraft winds and even rarer in model wings. Anhedral is used on a few horizontal stabilizers such as the F4 Phantom II.

If a wing is intended to have drooping wing tips (Anhedral) then the wing roots will still fit tightly together where they join with no gap in the joint on either the top or bottom of the wing. If a wing has drooping wing tips and has a gap in the top or bottom of the wing where the wing sections join, the wing has been assembled upside down. If the wing has been assembled upside down, a new wing will be required.

9.27. VMAR - Wing Fairing Replacement - How to Tips

Question: What is the best way to go about replacing a Fairing (generally used for wing to fuselage joints) on a VMAR model?

Answer: Actually it is not difficult if you go about it the right way. Please review the entire process listed below before actually doing anything.  

The key to this process is to NOT remove the entire old fairing off the model. If you take the old fairing entirely off the model you run the risk of damaging the covering AND will have a more difficult time aligning the new fairing into position.

1) First of all do NOT totally remove the old fairing!  We don't want to take a chance on spoiling the covering so we are going to leave the portion of the old fairing in place that currently is bonded to the covering.

2) Instead of removing the old fairing, carefully clean it all off with Fantastic and paper towels. This will remove all oil, dirt and grime. Clean the fairing and surrounding fuselage area twice.

3) Use Pacer (the ZAP people) RC56 Canopy Glue or Pacer DAP-A-GOO to carefully bond any loose spots of the old fairing back into place on the fuselage. If you've had a crash carefully retrieve and reuse as much of the fairing as possible. Ideally you want the fairing contact area firmly bonded to the fuselage. Will CA work... yes but be careful to avoid "clorosis" which leaves a white powder like residue... use Pacer Poly Zap or Plasti Zap to reduce clorosis effects. Best of all is the Canopy Glue.  

3) Now take a new SHARP #11 Xacto blade and carefully cut the fairing about 1/4" offset from the fuselage. We want to leave the "stub" of the old fairing in place.  

4) Now inspect the remainder of the old fairing and make sure that it is bonded to the fuselage... you can work from "inside" the exposed portion of old fairing if you have to.

5) Carefully trial fit the new fairing on top of the remains of the old fairing stub. You should get a nearly perfect fit particularly if the fairings have simulated 3D rivets. The simulated rivets will key exactly into the new fairing rivets.

6) After trial fitting the new fairing, use Pacer RC56 Canopy glue to carefully bond it into place. Clean up any excess adhesive before it cures. Check several times in case adhesive oozes out. Use low tack masking tape to hold the new fairing in place until the RC56 has thoroughly dried.

That's it!

9.28. VMAR - Wood Types Used in Construction

Question: What type of wood is used in the construction of a VMAR ARF?

Answer: Primarily (85%+) Balsa and Light Ply. Selected harder woods are used for some structural components such as stringers and wing joiners.

Production early in the new millenium included the use of wood alternatives to balsa for the wing sheeting and formers in some models. This was phased out starting in mid 2002 and the change over was complete by early 2003. .

As Balsa was more widely used throughout the VMAR line, average flying weights began to decrease significantly. The average VMAR model weighs 6-12oz less than it did prior to 2003.

VMAR began selling Balsa sheets in mid 2002 and rapidly became a major supplier of sheet Balsa worldwide. To order the same Balsa that is used in VMAR ARF products, see www.richmondrc.com

10. Technical Information - VMAR - Product by Product
10.1. VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern
10.1.1. VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with VCOTE Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with VCOTE applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.1.2. VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.1.2.1. VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern - Rear Exhaust & Tuned Pipe
Question: I have a VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern. Can I use an engine with a rear exhaust and a tuned pipe?

Answer: The VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern was designed assuming a side exhaust and standard muffler. You will likely need to make many changes to the factory engine compartment and mount to accomodate a rear exhaust engine and depending on the engine this may not be possible at all.
 
Tuned pipes that are exposed and attach to the side of the fuselage may be possible however the Avenger was not designed with tuned pipes in mind.
 
10.1.3. VMA-A0026 Avenger 60 ARF Aerobatic Pattern - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.2. VMA-A460X A4 Skyhawk Jet (Prop) 45-52 ARF 3DS - Blue & Navy
10.2.1. VMA-A460X A4 Skyhawk Jet (Prop) 45-52 ARF 3DS - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with VCOTE2 - 3DS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with VCOTE2 - 3DS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.2.2. VMA-A460X A4 Skyhawk Jet (Prop) 45-52 ARF 3DS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.3. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69"- Various Colors
10.3.1. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.3.2. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.3.2.1. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Control Horns - How Many in Parts Bag?

Question: The assembly manual for my Apache refers to five control horn sets. The parts bag contains only 3 sets in total and I think I only need 3 sets. Is this correct?

Answer: Yes only three control horn sets are required for your Apache. One control horn is used for the rudder and two control horns are used for the elevators.

10.3.2.2. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Engine Clamp Bolts - How to Remove

Question: I want to completely remove the engine clamp bolts from the engine mount in my Apache III. How do I do this?

Answer: This is not difficult but if it is necessary, there are two ways to approach this.

  • Method A: Undo the engine mount bolts that retain the engine mount to the firewall. Try to just loosen them enough so that you can toe the engine mount beam inwards at the nose and then subsequently remove the engine clamp bolts. Then retighten the engine mount bolts to secure the engine mount beam to the firewall.
  • Method B: Notch small cutouts into the lip of the fuselage that wraps into the engine compartment. The cutout notches should be positioned above each engine clamp bolt. Once the cutout notches have been completed you will be able to to undo the engine clamp bolts and remove them without moving the engine mount beams. Use a dremel tool or a small round bastard file to cut out the notches. Seal the exposed wood in the notches with Pacer Finishing Resin or thin ZAP/CA to prevent oil and fuel residue from penetrating into the wood.

 

10.3.2.3. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Fuel Tank - How to install

Question: How do I install the Fuel Tank into my VMAR Apache III?

Answer: This is not difficult but the instruction book does not cover this directly.

Do the fuel tank setup first. Install the internal tubing and clunk(s). When the stopper has been tightened but not overtightened, install pieces of fuel tubing between or over the ends of the metal pipes to seal them against dirt and debris. Mark the bottom of the tank so that you can clearly see which way the tank is to be positioned in the model.

Remove the fuel compartment hatch from the bottom of the fuselage.

Remove the black sealing gasket from the fuel tank. Apply sealant such as Pacer Dap-A-Goo to the front face of the tank around the neck and re-install the gasket. Apply more sealant to the front face of the gasket.

Insert the tank into the fuel tank compartment with the tubes forward and oriented so that the bottom of the tank is positioned correctly. Press the tank firmly against the back side of the firewall and secure in place while the sealant cures.

From the engine mount area, apply more sealant around the neck of the fuel tank working from the front of the fuselage.

When the sealant has dried, support the tank with sponge foam around the sides and bottom of the tank. You may wish to install your battery pack beneath or behind the tank before inserting the sponge foam.

Reinstall the fuel tank compartment hatch to the bottom of the fuselage.

10.3.2.4. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Landing Gear Location - Instructions Wrong

Some copies of the the Apache III Instruction Manual may have typo errors as follows:
Page 15 (or 20 depending on your manual) Stage 20 Picture 20.2 The annotation on the bottom of the fuselage showing the location of the landing gear for the tricycle gear configuration may be wrong. If the annotation says "Main gear mounting holes for tail dragger configuration" it is incorrect and should say "Main gear mounting holes for tricyle gear configuration"

10.3.2.5. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Landing Gear - Steering Arm does not fit
Consumer called and advised his steering arm does not fit into the Apache III nose gear.

The do fit but requires careful alignment and a bit of up pressure and twisting motion of the nose gear to insert into the steering arm bearing in some cases. To make this a bit easier the modeler can either drill out the steering arm bearing a bit, or grind the end of the nose gear wire a bit or sand a bit of plastic off the back of the steering arm bearing holder.
10.3.2.6. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Rudder Control Horn Hole - Wrong Location

Some versions of the Apache III may have been shipped with the rudder control horn mounting hole drilled too low. The rudder control horn mounting hole is pre-drilled at the factory prior to the rudder being covered. The hole is about .25” (6mm) in diameter and is located just aft of the rudder hinge line towards the bottom of the rudder. The hole can be located by holding the vertical stabilizer and rudder assembly and backlighting it from behind. A limited number of Apache III’s produced in the fall of 2003 and shipped to market in the Nov 2003 through Spring 2004 time frame may have the hole drilled about 1.25”(31mm) too low.

 

Resolution.

 

In Brief: Drill a new hole for the rudder control horn approximately 1.25” (31mm) higher than the hole pre-drilled at the factory.

 

In Detail: Insert the vertical stabilizer and rudder assembly into the mounting slot in the top of the fuselage. Locate the rudder control rod protruding from the top of the aft end of the fuselage. Free the rudder control rod from any lockdown tape installed near the servo tray for shipping purposes. From the aft end of the fuselage, extend the rudder control rod until it reaches the rudder hinge line. The rod should be approximately in line with the rudder control horn hole. If it is not, mark where the control rod crosses the rudder hinge line. Remove the vertical stabilizer from the fuselage. Drill a new rudder control horn hole to align with the control rod. Drill the hole to be the same diameter as that of the incorrectly placed hole done by the factory. Install the rudder control horn assembly in the new hole per the instruction procedures in the manual.

10.3.2.7. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Wing Servo Arm contacting Pilot Figure

Question: The servo arm on my wing servo is contacting the head of the pilot figure in my Apache III. Is this normal? What should I do to fix it?

Answer: No this is not what we intended and it should be fixed before flying your model. There are a couple of ways to resolve this.

1) Make sure your servo is a standard servo and that it is mounted down on the rails properly. Some of the ball bearing and high torque servos are in a case that stands higher than a standard servo.

2) Orient the servo so that the output shaft and arm are closer to the trailing edge of the wing rather than the leading edge. Adjust the aileron control rod lengths accordingly.

3) If after checking on 1 and 2, your servo arm is still contacting the pilot figure you will need to go to a lower profile servo or move the pilot figure slightly. We recommend moving the pilot figure and/or mounting plate... it's relatively simple to do. Here are three options that more or less accomplish the same thing:

  • Loosen the mounting screws for the plate and try to slide the plate further forward to gain more clearance, or
  • Remove the plate with pilot by sliding it backwards and out of the model. Examine the mounting rails. On both sides of the fuselage add a new rail below the existing rail leaving a wide enough vertical gap to accomodate the thickness of the plate. Re-install the plate and pilot so that the new rail is below the plate, or
  • The pilot figure is mounted to a plate. You can remove the pilot figure from the plate and relocate the figure further forward to clear the servo. Reattach the pilot figure to the plate using Pacer Dap-A-Goo.
10.3.3. VMA-A140X Apache III 40 ARF ECS Trainer 69" - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.4. VMA-A340X Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF ECS SPORT AEROBATIC - Various Colors
10.4.1. CG Location - Instructions Wrong - VMA-A340X VMAR Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF ECS

The CG location in the Instruction Book for the VMAR Arrow Tiger may be incorrect in some printings.

The CG for the VMAR Arrow Tiger should be located 3-3/4" to 4.0" back from the leading edge of the wing (measured where the wing meets the fuselage side). This will be approximately coincident with the thickest part of the wing. We recommend 3-3/4" for first flights.

Instructions that give the CG location at 3-1/8" to 3-3/8" are incorrect.

10.4.2. Hovering - Is It Possible for the VMA-A340X VMAR Arrow Tiger to Hover?

Question: Can the VMA Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF be made to Hover?

Answer: No.

Better Answer: The Arrow Tiger was designed with knife edge and high speed in mind. Hovering was not in the design criteria. In theory almost anything with a power to weight ratio greater than 1 can be made to Hover. Give the weight of the Arrow Tiger and power of a typical 46 to 52 it is not possible to Hover the Arrow Tiger.

10.4.3. Instructions - Wrong Model Named - VMA-A340X VMAR Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF ECS - Hornet means Arrow Tiger
There are various references to the VMAR Hornet in the instruction book for the VMAR Arrow Tiger.

References to the VMAR Hornet in the instruction book for the VMAR Arrow Tiger are misprints. All references to the VMAR Hornet are intended to refer to the VMAR Arrow Tiger.
10.4.4. VMA-A340X Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF - Is it a pattern ship?

Question: Is the VMA Arrow Tiger 46-52 ARF considered a pattern ship?

Answer: No not really. The Arrow Tiger is a hot moving sport plane that is very aerobatic, does knife edge and many other maneuvers but it was not designed with pattern flying in mind. In could be used a stepping stone moving towards a pattern airplane such as the VMAR Avenger 60 ARF.

10.5. VMA-BS110 Balsa Stripper
10.5.1. VMA-BS110 - What type of Blade does the unit use?

Question: What type of blade is used in the VMAR Balsa Stripper? I want to have some spares in case the factory blade gets dull or breaks.

Answer: The VMAR Balsa Stipper uses standard #11 Blades.

10.6. VMA-B140X Beaver 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Various Colors
10.6.1. VMA-B140X - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.6.2. VMA-B140X - Landing Gear (Main) - Fibreglass or Aluminum?
Question: Does the VMAR Beaver 45-60 ARF come with fibreglass or aluminum main gear?
Answer: During mid 2006 the VMAR Beaver 45-60 ARF main landing gear was upgraded from fibreglass to T6 aluminum main gear. The new main gear is lighter and stronger than that used earlier.
10.6.3. VMA-B140X - Wing Spars - Aluminum (VMA_B140XSPR) Size
Question: I have one of the new VMAR Beaver 45-60 ARF's with plug in wings. What size are the wing spar tubes? They appear to be aluminum.
 
Answer: The VMAR Beaver 45-60 was upgraded in 2006 to include a plug in wing. The wing is joined and mated to the fuselage using two aluminum tubes. The tube sizes are as follows:
 
1) Long Tube: 22.9 in. (582 mm) long x .43 in. (11 mm) OD
 
2) Short Tube: 11.4 in. (289 mm) long x .43 in. (11 mm) OD
10.6.4. VMA-B140X - Weight of Beaver 45-60 with VMAR Floats

Question: I am planning a project using the VMAR Beaver 45-60 ARF on the VMAR 35" Floats. What would be the weight of the Beaver plus floats? I qm considering different power systems and radio gear, so please tell me the weight of the model plus floats without any engine or radio gear.

Answer: The weight of the VMAR Beaver 45-60 ARF equipped with VMAR 35" Floats is approx 5 lbs 9 oz [2530 grams]. This includes the weight of the cowl and a typical propeller but without any power system or radio gear.

10.7. VMA-B160C Beaver 60-90 Semiscale ARF
10.7.1. VMA-B160C Beaver 60-90 Semiscale ARF - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.7.2. VMA-B160C Beaver 60-90 Semiscale ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.8. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span
10.8.1. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.8.2. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.8.2.1. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - Aileron Extensions - Not Provided

Question: My assembly manual for the 10 foot Beaver #VMA-B191C makes reference to some aileron extensions. I did not get these. What's the story? Am I missing something?

Answer: Due to the wide variation in radio connectors, servos and tolerance for different lengths of extensions we have discontinued supplying aileron extensions. Modelers should follow their radio manufacturers recommendations regarding the use of aileron extensions.

10.8.2.2. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - Instructions Do Not Reflect Plug In Wing

The Beaver 120ARF has been updated to incorporate a plug-in semi-symmetrical wing. Some of the screws, washers etc in the instruction book are no longer included as they are no longer needed. The wooden spar joiner has been replaced by two long round aluminum tubes that mount the wings to the fuselage.

The CG Location has not changed. The CG is as stated and is approx coincident with the thickest part of the wing about 30% back from the leading edge.

Short Term... information has been published on our external Knowledge base and will be provided as an addendum sheet with Beaver 120ARF instruction books.

Longer Term... the instruction book will be amended to reflect the upgrade and changed hardware.

10.8.2.3. VMA-B190C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - Older Version Without Tube Spars

The attached PDF contains important information about the original older version of the B190C Beaver 120ARF that had wood spar joiners and the wing located in a saddle in the top of the fuselage. This older model was superceded in 2004-2005 by the new B191C Beaver 120ARF that has two aluminum tube spars and a fuselage that is used with "plug in" wings.

10.8.3. VMA-B191C Beaver 120+ ARF SemiScale ARF 120 in. Span - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.9. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Elect & Glow - Various Colors
10.9.1. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.9.1.1. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.9.1.2. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Supplement to the Manual
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.9.1.2.1. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Battery Installation

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20050712 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 16, Figure 28B. The text below the Caption for Figure 28B refers to "...with Velcro (supplied) or ..."  Please note that Bird Dogs produced prior to August 2005 did not come with Velcro and the battery should be secured using lightweight foam so that it does not move. Beginning with production in September 2005, a new laser cut battery platform and Velcro retaining strap was included along with an ADDITIONAL INFORMATION sheet that explains how to install the battery platform. The ADDITIONAL INFORMATION sheet supercedes the manual.
 
 
10.9.1.2.2. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Control Horns

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20050712 (see manual back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Some Bird Dogs produced prior to August 2005,  were shipped with two small plastic disc's in lieu of a single square backing plate for some of the control horns. These small disc's serve exactly the same purpose as the square backing plate... the only difference is that there are two of them... one for each screw. Beginning with production in September 2005, a new laser cut control horn assembly replaced the plastic screw type control horns previously used with the VMAR Bird Dog 06-12 ARF. If laser cut control horns have been supplied, an ADDITIONAL INFORMATION sheet has been included with the control horn parts bag and shows the correct method of installing the laser cut control horns. The ADDITIONAL INFORMATION sheet supercedes the manual.
 
 
10.9.1.2.3. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Firewall Spacing - Page 8, Figure 12K

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20050712 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 8, Figure 12K. This figure shows the 3mm nuts evenly spaced at .875 in. (22 mm) from the firewall. This works well for some motor shafts but may be lessened or expanded to reflect different lengths of motor shafts. The important thing here is that the motor shaft be able to extend through the front of the cowl and still securely hold the propeller without the propeller contacting the cowl. A distance of 1-3/32 in. (27mm) works well for many popular motors.
 
 
10.9.1.2.4. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Vertical Stabilizer Fit - Page 6, Step 8.1 & Figure 8A

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20050712 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 6, Step 8.1 & Figure 8A. Step 8.1 and Figure 8A describe and show the dry test fitting of the vertical stabilizer into the vertical stabilizer slot in the top of the fuselage. On some early versions of the Bird Dog produced in July and August of 2005 the slot in the fuselage is slightly too deep so that the vertical stabilizer tab shown in Figure 8D does not contact the bottom of the slot when inserted into the fuselage. 

If your vertical stabilizer does not contact the bottom of the fuselage slot when inserted into the fuselage you need to rectify this with a small filler strip inserted into the fuselage slot and tacked into place with CA or other glue before installing the vertical stabilizer using 30 minute epoxy. The filler strip should be approximately 5-7mm high and the width and length of the slot. Use balsa or other light wood to make this strip. Dry fit the strip and the vertical stabilizer before gluing anything into place. The idea here is to make sure that the bottom of the vertical stabilizer tab seats firmly against the strip which in turn fills the gap in the bottom of the fuselage slot. 

10.9.1.3. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Important Information
 
 
 
 
10.9.1.3.1. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Covering

This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering

POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
10.9.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.9.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.9.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.9.2. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below. 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.9.2.1. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Electric Power Systems for Flight at High Altitudes

For those of you who may be wondering about flying a VMAR Bird Dog at High Altitude please see the general article on high altitude electric performance included further below.


In addition to the article included below, here is some feedback provided by a modeler flying a Bird Dog near Durango, CO at approximately 7000 feet above sea level.

He has equipped his Bird Dog as follows:

  • AXI Outrunner 2808/24
  • 3 Cell LiPo consisting of 2 x 2200mAh 3 cell packs in parallel for 4400 mAh total capacity.
  • Using a Graupner Folding 10x6 Prop

Reports brisk reliable performance with this power system in the Bird Dog.


 

Electric Power - Performance at High Altitudes

Question: I live at 5000 feet above sea level. What should I do to get my electric power system to perform at high altitudes as well as it does at sea level?

Answer: It's tough to get the same performance at 5000 or 8000 feet as you do at sea level but we do have a technique that will help you come close.

First of all it's important to understand a few things:

1) Unlike an internal combustion engine (i.e. glow or gas), an electric motor does not consume oxygen and hence could care less about oxygen or anything else that affects combustion.

2) An electric motor system that runs well at sea level will underperform at higher altitudes not because the air has less oxygen but because the air is thinner. Hot weather does the same thing... the air gets thinner. Hot and high together can really gang up and take a chunk out of the performance.

In order to get your electric motor system to perform in thinner air the same way it does at sea level, you may actually have to change the motor, speed control, battery pack and prop but before you go reaching for your credit card here is a technique that attacks the problem from the lowest cost component first.

1) Measure the watts that your power system consumes at sea level or other relatively low altitude location. Use a Medusa Power Analyzer or AstroFlight Whatt meter.

2) Better yet, if possible, use the Medusa Power Analyzer PRO thrust meter to measure the thrust generated and the watts consumed.

3) Now do the same measurements (1 & 2) at the higher altitude location. You will notice that your system consumes less watts and if you are able to measure thrust you will notice that you get less thrust at higher altitude than you do at lower altitude. This is because the air is thinner (less dense) at higher altitudes.

4) In order to get the thrust back up to where it was at lower altitudes you need the prop to move more of the thinner air. To do this, select a higher pitch and/or larger diameter prop for use at higher altitudes. Test again and try to find a prop that gives you the same thrust and/or watt values as you were getting on the original prop at lower altitude. If you can get the same thrust at 5000 feet as you got at sea level for example, you will have similar flight performance. Thrust is really the key here and it's best to work with thrust numbers but watts are a good relative indicator of thrust. Not perfect but still helpful!

Be cautious when testing to ensure that the motor, ESC and battery do not overheat with the new prop. Some compromising may be necessary to get good performance that does not overheat components.

In a perfect world, you would carefully select a specific motor, ESC, battery and prop to get the ideal combination for high altitude performance when installed in a particular model. Yup... perfect is best... but for those of us who can settle for a bit less than ideal and have limited budgets, changing the prop to generate similar thrust in high, hot & thinner air as you get in low, cool & thicker air is a good low cost way to go.    

 

10.9.2.2. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Stage 12 Installing Electric Motor and ESC - Step 12C Mounting Screw (Bolt) Set
Question: Stage 12 Step 12C of my B210X Manual refers to installing three bolt and washer sets for mounting the motor. These bolt sets are stated to come with the kit but I did not get these in my kit. What's the story here?

Answer: The reference to the bolt sets (mounting screws) in your version of the B210X Manual is incorrect. The motor mounting system was modified to use four mounting screws not three as stated. These mounting screws come with the Power Module and Power Pack but are not included with the kit. Each motor is different and requires different mounting hardware and methods. We do provide a blank firewall set that can be drilled to suit nearly all motors. 
 
Mounting Screws - What to use on VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor

Question: I have a VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor. What do I need in the way of mounting screws?

Answer: There are a several options for this depending on what you have in mind:
a) VMAX VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motors that are supplied with VMAX Power Modules and VMAX Power Packs come pre-mounted with the appropriate screws for the motor.
 
b) The threads are 3mm and generally four 3mm x 6-12 mm machine hex head screws with washers will work.
 
c) We sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MS) consisting of four 3mm x 10mm hex head screws. Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
d) We also sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MT) consisting of 16 mounting screws. Four screws in each of four different sizes/styles.
  • 3 x 10 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (like VMM-111B18MS)
  • 3 x 16 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (longer version of above)
  • 3 x   6 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting)
  • 3 x 10 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting) 
The four different sizes/styles allow for thicker firewalls, multi-layer firewalls where the screw heads must be countersunk between the layers, etc.
 
This set provides for a very wide range of different mounting methods.
 
Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
CAUTION: When mounting motors using any method, ensure all fasteners are tightened securely. Check for vibration free operation of the motor. If not vibration free, reseat and retighten all fasteners and ancilliary components such as props and gears. Tighten fasteners firmly but don't strip the threads. Use medium strength thread locker on all metal to metal fasteners.

 

10.9.2.3. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Tool Sizes for Power Module Hardware

Wrench and Socket Head sizes for the VMAR Bird Dog power module hardware are as follows:

For the Prop Nuts 7/32"

For the Power Module nuts (that fit on the four threaded studs that attach the firewall to fhe fuselage) 7/32" deep socket

For the four black machine screws that go through the firewall and thread into tapped holes in the motor mount (backing plate) 2.5mm Allen Wrench

For the 2 or 3 black grub screws that retain the motor into the backing plate are accessed via the slot between the motor the backing plate 1.5 mm Allen Wrench.

 

10.9.2.4. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Wing Servo Requires Clearance Slot in Wing Strut Mounting Washer.

Question: When I am mounting wing servos in the VMAR Bird Dog, the wing strut attachment point washer is in the way of the mounting tab on one of the servos. What do I do?

Solution: This is easy to fix. Use a sharp #11 Xacto blade to knotch out the wooden washer as shown in the picture below. Takes about 15 seconds and you'll be good to go.

Note that this notching is only required where the strut washer and servo are in contact. This appears only to be an issue on production models up to November 2005.

10.9.3. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.9.4. VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.9.4.1. Logo VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF
10.9.4.1.1. Logo VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - JPG (RGB)
10.9.4.1.2. Logo VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - PSD (PhotoShop)
10.9.4.1.3. Logo VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - TIF (CMYK)
10.9.4.2. Pictures VMA-B210A Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Army (Red on White)
10.9.4.2.1. Pictures VMA-B210A Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Army (Red on White) - JPG (RGB)
10.9.4.2.2. Pictures VMA-B210A Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Army (Red on White) - PSD (Photoshop)
10.9.4.2.3. Pictures VMA-B210A Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Army (Red on White) - TIF (CMYK)
10.9.4.3. Pictures VMA-B210U Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - USAF (Yellow on Gray)
10.9.4.3.1. Pictures VMA-B210U Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - USAF (Yellow on Gray) - JPG (RGB)
10.9.4.3.2. Pictures VMA-B210U Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - USAF (Yellow on Gray) - PSD (PhotoShop)
10.9.4.3.3. Pictures VMA-B210U Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - TIF (Yellow on Gray) - PSD (CMYK)
10.9.4.4. Pictures VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - from the Fan Club
10.9.4.4.1. Pictures - VMA-B210X Bird Dog 06-12 ARF - Courtesy Barry Waters
10.10. VMA-C0024X Chipmunk 40 Semiscale ARF - Canada & British
10.10.1. VMA-C0024X Chipmunk 40 Semiscale ARF - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with VCOTE Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with VCOTE applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.10.2. VMA-C0024X Chipmunk 40 Semiscale ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.10.2.1. VMA-C0024X Chipmunk 40 Semiscale ARF - Horizontal Thrust Line

Question: Where is the horizontal thrust line on the VMAR Chipmunk 40 ARF removeable firewall?

Answer: The VMAR Chipmunk 40 ARF horizontal thrust line is 1-13/32" down from the top of the firewall.

Better Answer: The VMAR Chipmunk 40 ARF horizontal thrust line is 1-13/32" down from the top of the firewall. It can also be estimated by locating the cowl correctly on the fuselage and then drawing the horizontal thrust line so that it appears to pass midway through the crankshaft hole in the front of the cowl.

10.10.3. VMA-C0024X Chipmunk 40 Semiscale ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.11. VMA-C044 Cap 231EX 40 ARF Aerobatic Sport
10.11.1. VMA-C044 Cap 231EX 40 ARF Aerobatic Sport - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.11.2. VMA-C044 Cap 231EX 40 ARF Aerobatic Sport - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.11.3. VMA-C044 Cap 231EX 40 ARF Aerobatic Sport - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.12. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Elect & Glow - Various Colors
10.12.1. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.12.1.1. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.12.1.2. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Supplement to the Manual

10.12.1.2.1. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Control Horns - Laser Cut Wood

Question: My VMAR VMA-C210X 09-15 ARF was supplied with control horns that appear to be made of wood. Are these OK? 

Answer: Yes these are laser cut from aircraft plywood and are strong, light, reliable and easy to install. In some later production J3 Cub and L4 Grasshoppers the horns are laser cut from Mylar sheets.

Additional Information:  After installing the control horns made from plywood, we recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP (Pink) into the plywood of the control horn to "harden" the plywood and holes. Do two applications about 1 minute apart.

 

10.12.1.3. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Important Information

 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.12.1.3.1. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Covering

This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering

POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
10.12.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.12.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.12.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.12.2. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.12.2.1. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Quick Release Wing Strut Set #VMA-C210YWSQ

Question: I travel a great deal and take my VMAR C210X 09-15 ARF with me in my RV. When I'm home, I remove the wing and undo the struts from the fuselage. But when I am travelling I like to remove the struts from the wing as well. I've been undoing the screws and it works OK but I was wondering if you have a strut set that can be removed more easily and quickly for traveling?

Answer: Yes we do. For modelers who need to frequently remove the wing struts from the VMAR C210X 09-15 ARF, we have released a new Quick Release Strut Set. For the J3 Cub these struts are Yellow (#VMA-C210YWSQ) and for the L4 Grasshopper these struts are Drab Green (VMA-C210DWSQ). The quick release struts are easier to install and can be removed more quickly that the standard struts. Colored to match the model, the quick release struts use Z-Bend ends for the wing attachment points (2 per strut) instead of using screws and brass plates.

Fitting the quick release strut set requires minor modification to the wing attachment points (4).

Instructions for modifying the wing attachment points:

  1. Wick CA into & around the 4 plywood washers where the struts attach to the wings.
  2. Use a 3/32" drill bit to enlarge the screw holes at the attachment points.
  3. Use a 7/64" drill bit to further enlarge the screw holes to 50% depth.
  4. Test fit the struts and then remove them.
  5. Wick thin CA into the drill holes to toughen the wood or if the strut Z-bends become loose in the holes.  

Caution: be careful with drilling. Don't drill through the wing or your fingers!

10.12.2.2. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Stage 1 Wing Assembly Joining the Wing Halves - Step 1G Leading Edge Dowel
Question:  Stage 1 of my C210X Manual for the J3 Cub and L4 Grasshopper shows a notch in both wing roots but does not show me when to install the small leading edge dowel. What should I do?

Answer: Your version of the Manual is missing Step 1G and its accompanying picture. After you have completed Step 1F, please do the following: 
    1. Locate the leading edge dowel in the Wing Parts Bag. The dowel is made of wood and is about 5/8 in [16 mm] in length. 
    2. Wait for the 30 minute epoxy you applied earlier to dry. 
    3. Trial fit the wing halves together. 
      • Carefully insert the dowel into the pre-drilled hole (formed by the channels in each wing root) in the leading edge. 
      • Mark the dowel where it meets the leading edge of the wing when the dowel is about half way inserted. 
    4. Remove the dowel and separate the wings.
    5. Carefully position the dowel into the pre-drilled channel in one wing half.
      • Position the dowel consistent with the reference mark you made earlier.
      • Secure the dowel into place with a small amount of medium thick CA+ such as Pacer Zap-A-Gap.
      • Make sure the dowel is reasonably straight (perpendicular to the leading edge).
      • Let the CA+ dry.
    6. From this point on you can proceed with Stage 2 where you apply 30 minute epoxy to the wing roots, spar joiner etc and mate the wing halves.
      • When doing so make sure you apply 30 minute epoxy into the visible portion of the dowel channels and over the dowel itself prior to mating the wings.
10.12.2.3. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Stage 12 Installing Electric Motor and ESC - Step 12C Mounting Screw (Bolt) Set
Question: Stage 12 Step 12C of my C210X Manual refers to installing four bolt and washer sets for mounting the motor. These bolt sets are stated to come with the kit but I did not get these in my kit. What's the story here?

Answer: The reference to the bolt sets (mounting screws) in your version of the C210X Manual is incorrect. These mounting screws come with the Power Module and Power Pack but are not included with the kit. Each motor is different and requires different mounting hardware and methods. We do provide a blank firewall set that can be drilled to suit nearly all motors. 
 
Mounting Screws - What to use on VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor

Question: I have a VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor. What do I need in the way of mounting screws?

Answer: There are a several options for this depending on what you have in mind:
a) VMAX VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motors that are supplied with VMAX Power Modules and VMAX Power Packs come pre-mounted with the appropriate screws for the motor.
 
b) The threads are 3mm and generally four 3mm x 6-12 mm machine hex head screws with washers will work.
 
c) We sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MS) consisting of four 3mm x 10mm hex head screws. Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
d) We also sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MT) consisting of 16 mounting screws. Four screws in each of four different sizes/styles.
  • 3 x 10 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (like VMM-111B18MS)
  • 3 x 16 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (longer version of above)
  • 3 x   6 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting)
  • 3 x 10 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting) 
The four different sizes/styles allow for thicker firewalls, multi-layer firewalls where the screw heads must be countersunk between the layers, etc.
 
This set provides for a very wide range of different mounting methods.
 
Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
CAUTION: When mounting motors using any method, ensure all fasteners are tightened securely. Check for vibration free operation of the motor. If not vibration free, reseat and retighten all fasteners and ancilliary components such as props and gears. Tighten fasteners firmly but don't strip the threads. Use medium strength thread locker on all metal to metal fasteners.

 

10.12.2.4. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Stage 12 Installing Electric Motor and ESC - Step 12J Bolt Length
Question: Stage 12 Step 12J of my C210X Manual for the J3 Cub and L4 Grasshopper refers to installing four bolts for the power module. These bolts are stated to be 50mm long. My bolts are only about 30mm in length. What's the story here?

Answer: The reference to 50mm long bolts in your version of the C210X Manual is incorrect. The bolts are 30 mm long when used in the J3 Cub and L4 Grasshopper. This allows the tapered cowl to be mounted without contacting excess bolt length. The picture and instructions of Step 12K are correct in showing the separation between the fixed fuselage firewall and the nuts to be approximately 22mm. It is this spacing of the nuts and power module firewall at approximately 22mm from the fixed firewall in the fuselage that is important, not the actual length of the bolts themselves.
 
10.12.2.5. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Stage 15 Installing The Servos - Step 15B & 15C
 
10.12.3. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.12.4. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.12.4.1. Pictures VMA-C210Y J3 Cub 09-15 ARF - Yellow
10.12.4.1.1. Pictures VMA-C210Y J3 Cub 09-15 ARF - Yellow - TIF (CMYK)
10.12.4.2. Pictures VMA-C210D L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - DDay
10.12.4.2.1. Pictures VMA-C210D L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - DDay - TIF (CMYK)
10.12.5. VMA-C210X J3 Cub & L4 Grasshopper 09-15 ARF - Reviews
10.12.5.1. Reviews VMA-C210Y J3 Cub 09-15 ARF - Yellow
10.13. VMA-C260U F4U Corsair 60 SemiScale ECS ARF - US Marines
10.13.1. VMA-C260U F4U Corsair 60 SemiScale ECS ARF - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.13.2. VMA-C260U F4U Corsair 60 SemiScale ECS ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.13.2.1. VMA-C260U F4U Corsair 60 SemiScale ECS ARF - Landing Gear - Retract Ready?

Question: Is the VMAR Corsair 60 ARF Retract Ready?

Answer: No

Better Answer: The Corsair comes with fixed gear. It was not designed with retracts in mind and no provision for retracts has been made. It is not retract ready. A great deal of work on the wings and wing structure would be required by modelers if they wish to install retracts in the VMAR Corsair. We have not designed the wing to accept retracts and do not recommend modifying the wing to accept retracts.

10.13.3. VMA-C260U F4U Corsair 60 SemiScale ECS ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.14. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Various Colors
10.14.1. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.14.2. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.14.2.1. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Extra Parts
Question: In the shipping box for my VMAR Cessna 182 45-60 ARF ECS I found several extra white plastic parts. What are they for?

 
Answer: The extra parts are optional but do help to dress up the model. The larger pieces are center wing joint covers. The smaller pieces are fairings that can be slid over the wing struts to hide the end fittings where the struts meet the wing.  
10.14.2.2. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Thrust Line Location

Question: In the instruction manual for the VMAR Cessna 182 45-60 ARF ECS it says to align to the thrust line with the engine "sharp". This is confusing and I don't understand this. What does this mean?

Answer: This is a misprint. It is supposed to say "shaft" not "sharp" as in align the thrust line with the engine shaft and specifically refers to the center of the engine shaft.

Supplementary Information: Here are some additional articles that may be helpful.

Firewall - Thrust Lines - Where are they? Horizontal and Vertical

Question: I am installing my engine. Where are the thrust lines on the firewall?

Answer: The horizontal thrust line normally appears on the forward face of the firewall or you draw the horizontal thrust line on the forward face of the firewall yourself following location instructions contained in the documentation that came with your model.

If there is no horizontal line indicated on the firewall and you are unable to locate the location of the line in the reference material there is an easy way to position the horiztonal thrust line youself. To do this, fit your cowl over the fuselage. Look at the cowl from the left and right sides and adjust the vertical angle of the cowl to align with the fuselage. There should not be any sharp drop or rise in the silhouette profile of the fuselage as you move your eye along the fuselage and over the cowl. Once you have the cowl in place, look through the front hole where the crankshaft is going to protrude. Mark the horizontal thrust line on the firewall so that it is evenly located up and down with respect to the hole in the front of the cowl.

The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. If it is not shown, you can simply draw it into place. Make sure it is in the middle.

You may also find this information on our web site. Look for the links to your model, then the link to the detailed information and browse down to the engine section. The position of the horizontal and/or vertical thrust line may be stated there.

Engine Orientation - Upright, Sideways, Inverted - Relation to Position on FIrewall

Question: How do I position my engine on the engine mounts and on the firewall when I intend on installing the engine at an angle or inverted rather than upright?

Short Answer: Regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. There are a few exceptions as described below.

Better Answer: Some models pretty much force you to install your engine in an upright orientation. Other models, particularly once you move up from basic trainers, offer you a variety of engine orientation options. Rotated 90 degrees is one such choice that often works well with Pitts style mufflers...  inverted (sometimes called 180 degree rotation) is another choice. Generally these non-upright orientations, hide more of the engine and muffler and result in a more realistic scale like appearance to the model.

The choice of what angle to use is pretty much up to you, limited by the physical size of the engine, muffler, cowl etc. Some engines for example can be oriented at 90 or 135 degrees but run into a physical problem at other angles... they hit something, the muffler won't clear the fuselage, the needle valve is at an awkward location etc. When selecting an angle to mount your engine, you have to balance off appearance, convenience, practicality and most of all make sure it can physically fit. Don't forget to test your planned installation angle with the muffler and carb installed. Also check out your engine manual for any specific guidance from the engine manufacturer. Some manufacturers don't recommend an exactly inverted 180 degree installation. We have found this to be good advice in many cases... 180 degree inversions have a tendency to smother the glow plug in oil and residue if run at low RPM for too long.

Once you've decided on the installation orientation that you want, the actual position of the engine on the firewall is no different with a rotated engine than it is with an upright engine. The engine thrust is always centered around the crankshaft and regardless of orientation, the center line of the crankshaft must be positioned over the intersection of the vertical and horizontal thrust lines for your particular model. The vertical thrust line lies up and down through the middle of the firewall. The horizontal thrust line is often drawn on the firewall or is to be draw on the firewall by you after referencing location information in the model instruction manual.  

There are some exceptions but the exceptions are few and far between... if the mounting face of the engine mounting lugs is offset from the center line of the crankshaft you have to adjust accordingly. This is rare, we have not seen this in standard two stroke engines. Engine manufacturers avoid this if at all possible. If you are working with a large gas engine adapted from another industry or a multi piston engine, examine the mounting system carefully and make sure you understand the relation between the engine mounting lugs and the center line of the crankshaft.

 

10.14.3. VMA-C360X Cessna 182 45-60 Semiscale ARF ECS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.15. VMA-D014 Discovery 40 ARF Hi Wing 63 in. - Various Colors
10.15.1. VMA-D014 Discovery 40 ARF Hi Wing 63 in. - READ ME FIRST
READ ME FIRST - for Models with POLYCOTE ECS Covering
The Read Me First for models covered with POLYCOTE ECS applies to this product and is available at:
 
 
The Read Me First will open in a second window. Please review it, print it or email it using the icons located near the top right of the Read Me First page (mouse over each icon for feedback about what it does). When you are finished, close the Read Me First window and continue browing here.
10.15.2. VMA-D014 Discovery 40 ARF Hi Wing 63 in. - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.15.3. VMA-D014 Discovery 40 ARF Hi Wing 63 in. - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.16. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS
10.16.1. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

 
 
LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.16.1.1. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - General Information
 
 
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.16.1.2. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Supplement to the Manual
10.16.1.2.1. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Electric Power - Options
Question: I have a VMAR VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS.  What do you recommend for a power system?
 
Answer: We have a couple of options for you to consider:
 
1) Our VMAX Power Module for the DO27 1100EP is #VMM-D210XPM1. This consists of our VMAX Brushless Motor (#VMC-120B15VC) and our VMAX Electronic Speed Control (ESC) (#VMC-120B15VC). The motor and the ESC have been pre-installed onto the power module firewall to fit your model. 
 
2) Our VMAX Power Pack for the DO27 1100EP (#VMM-D210XPP1) contains the Power Module plus a LiPO battery pack, wiring harness and propeller.
 
Both of these options have been tested with the VMAR D027 1100EP and help you get into the air quickly and stay there!
 
 
10.16.1.2.2. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Electric Power - Wiring
Question: How should I wire my VMAR VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS?
 
Answer: The simplest solution is to use our VMAX Power Pack which comes with a brushless motor, electronic speed control (ESC with BEC), battery pack, propellor etc and includes a custom made wiring harness for the the DO27 1100EP.
The Power Pack for the DO27 11EP IS #VMM-D210XPP1.
 
If you have purchased the VMAX Power Pack please follow the installation instructions that come with the Power Pack. The VMAX Power Pack will save you hours of time and greatly reduce the chances of making an expensive mistake.

The DO27 1100EP includes a fuse switch assembly that is externally accessible and a short Y-splitter for coupling both aileron servos so that they can be driven from one receiver channel.
 
If you have your own motors, servos, speed controls etc that you intend on using, the manufacturer of these electric components is your best bet for advice.
 
10.16.1.3. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Important Information

 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.16.1.3.1. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Covering

This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering

POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
10.16.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.16.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.16.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.16.2. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.16.2.1. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Control Rod Length - Adjusting
Question: Can I adjust the length of the control rods in my model?  I want to use my existing servos and shift one servo slightly and when I do that the rods seem slightly too long. What should I do?
 
Answer: Most VMAR models use an inner and outer plastic rod system for the control rods. At each end, the plastic inner rod usually couples to a threaded metal rod which in turn connects to a clevis.

1) Slightly Longer Control Rods: You can make the control rods slightly longer by adjusting the position of the clevis on the threaded metal rod at each end. Do not over do it or the clevis could come off under load. Tug test to ensure you have a secure coupling after any adjustment.

2) Much Longer Control Rods: You will need to change either the metal threaded rods at each end (we have these in stock in various lengths) OR cut the inner plastic rod and splice an additional piece of the splined plastic rod into place. Use 2mm threaded metal studs as couplers. Tug test to ensure you have a secure coupling after any such modification.

3) Shorter Control Rods: You can make the control rods slightly shorter by adjusting the position of the clevis on the threaded metal rod at each end. Tug test to ensure you have a secure coupling after any adjustment.

To further reduce the control rod length:

  • From one end of the rod, unscrew the clevis and threaded stud.
  • Use a pair of scissors or snips to cut the plastic rod to the shorter length you required.
  • Thread the stud and clevis back onto the plastic rod.
  • Tug test to ensure you have a secure coupling.

4) If in any doubt about the security of any coupling, unthread the clevis and wick thin CA into the coupling between the stud and the plastic tube. Do not get CA into the clevis threads.

10.16.2.2. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Extra Hardware Items
Question: I have completed the assembly of my VMAR VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS and I have a few extra hardware items such as horns, screws and wing bolts. What are these for?
 
Answer: We usually include a few extra horns and wing bolts with all VMAR ARF's. You may also find a spare clevis and a couple of small screws depending on the model. These are free and intended to help you out if you drop or misplace one of these small items. If you have followed all of the assembly steps, completed your model, tested that your radio and control surfaces all move correctly, tug tested everything twice, just put any of extra hardware pieces in one of the bags and set it aside as spares just in case you need them later on. Don't throw anything out, you just never know when that screw, horn or nut may be needed!
10.16.2.3. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Glow Power - Tips
Question: Can I use a glow engine to power my VMAR VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS. If so what sizes are recommended? Any tips you can suggest on what I need to plan for? 
 
Answer: Yes the VMAR VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS can be powered with a glow engine. We suggest glow engines be  .06 to .10 cu. in.Please note that this model has been intended for Electric Flight and does not come with a tank or engine mount. It does however utilize the VMAR power module system which makes it easier to modify the propulsion system to glow.

Tips on use of glow power:
 
1) We recommend two stroke engines for this model. Four stroke engines tend to be bigger and heavier.
 
2) You will need to plan your fuel tank and engine mounting system with careful consideration for physical space particularly if you wish to try to install the engine so that you can use the cowl
 
3) Use Pacer Finishing Resin and a brush to throughly seal any exposed wood, particularly that of the firewall, the power module forward firewall and the attachment area on the wing. Also the wing saddle area. The exhaust from glow engines contains lots of hot vapourized and liquid oil residue. Although most of this oil will be channeled out in the exhaust, some oil will inevitably get on the model itself and will be absorbed by any unsealed wood. Oil can weaken glue joints and the wood itself.
 
4) Glow engines tend to produce considerable vibration particularly if the propellor is not balanced correctly. Take particular care to balance your propellor. Vibration can cause fuel feed problems, lean runs and engine cut off as well as structural failure, control surface flutter and/or separation and is very damaging to servos. It is very important to keep vibration to a minimum.
 
10.16.2.4. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Stage 11 Installing Electric Motor and ESC - Step 11C Mounting Screw (Bolt) Set
Question: Stage 11 Step 11C of my D210X Manual refers to installing four bolt and washer sets for mounting the motor. These bolt sets are stated to come with the kit but I did not get these in my kit. What's the story here?

Answer: The reference to the bolt sets (mounting screws) in your version of the D210X Manual is incorrect. These mounting screws come with the Power Module and Power Pack but are not included with the kit. Each motor is different and requires different mounting hardware and methods. We do provide a blank firewall set that can be drilled to suit nearly all motors. 
 
Mounting Screws - What to use on VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor

Question: I have a VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motor. What do I need in the way of mounting screws?

Answer: There are a several options for this depending on what you have in mind:
a) VMAX VMAX #VMM-111B18VM VMAX Brushless Motors that are supplied with VMAX Power Modules and VMAX Power Packs come pre-mounted with the appropriate screws for the motor.
 
b) The threads are 3mm and generally four 3mm x 6-12 mm machine hex head screws with washers will work.
 
c) We sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MS) consisting of four 3mm x 10mm hex head screws. Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
d) We also sell a Mounting Screw Set (#VMM-111B18MT) consisting of 16 mounting screws. Four screws in each of four different sizes/styles.
  • 3 x 10 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (like VMM-111B18MS)
  • 3 x 16 mm Hex head machine screws (4) (longer version of above)
  • 3 x   6 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting)
  • 3 x 10 mm Phillips countersink head screws (4) (for flush fitting) 
The four different sizes/styles allow for thicker firewalls, multi-layer firewalls where the screw heads must be countersunk between the layers, etc.
 
This set provides for a very wide range of different mounting methods.
 
Hex head screws should be used with flat washers under the heads.
 
CAUTION: When mounting motors using any method, ensure all fasteners are tightened securely. Check for vibration free operation of the motor. If not vibration free, reseat and retighten all fasteners and ancilliary components such as props and gears. Tighten fasteners firmly but don't strip the threads. Use medium strength thread locker on all metal to metal fasteners.

 

10.16.3. VMA-D210X DO27 1100 EP 43 in. Electric ARF ECS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.17. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Various Colors
10.17.1. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.17.1.1. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.17.1.2. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Supplement to the Manual
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.17.1.2.1. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Ailerons and Flaps - Locations

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please note that this model has ailerons located outboard on the wings and flaps located inboard on the wings. The ailerons are activated by a servo in the bottom of each wing. The flaps are optional and will require two servos located in the more inboard wing cavities.  

10.17.1.2.2. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Control Horns

 

Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

10.17.1.2.3. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Cowl - Handle Carefully

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please handle the cowl carefully. The cowl has been pre-painted to match the appearance of the full size aircraft that this model has been based upon. The shape of the cowl will be most realistic when fitted over the firewall.
 
10.17.1.2.4. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Engine & Prop Size - Recommendations

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

This model flies well on a .46 size two stroke engine such as the VMAX 46PRO or a .52 size two stroke engine such as the VMAX 52PRO. We suggest using a larger diameter lower pitch prop that you might have used on another model with a similar sized engine. Check your engine manual and select a prop that is at the maximum diameter in the recommended range of props for your engine. We have found that a .46 works well on this model with an 11 x 5 or 12 x 4 prop. The idea here is to locate the thrust out beyond the edge of the fuselage and cowl. A larger diameter prop helps accomplish this.
 
10.17.1.2.5. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Fuel Tank Installation - Page 9 & 10, Stage 18

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 4, Stage 5, Figures 5.1 and 5.2

Some servos have a rubber boot strain relief around the wire coming from the servo. Notch the bottom of the servo rails shown in Figures 5.1 and 5.2 to clear the rubber root or wire if required.   
 
10.17.1.2.6. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Long Servo Arm - Page 4 & 5, Stage 5 & 6

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 4 & 5, Stage 5 & 6,
 
Use a long servo arm and mount the servo as close to the servo cover plate as possible to maximize the length of the servo arm protruding from the bottom of the wing. 
 
 
10.17.1.2.7. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Servo Boot Clearance - Page 4, Stage 5, Figure 5.1 & 5.2

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 4, Stage 5, Figures 5.1 and 5.2

Some servos have a rubber boot strain relief around the wire coming from the servo. Notch the bottom of the servo rails shown in Figures 5.1 and 5.2 to clear the rubber root or wire if required.   
 
10.17.1.2.8. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Servo Cover Plates - Aileron & Flaps - Page 4 & 5, Stage 5 & 6

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 4, Stage 5, Figures 5.1 and 5.2

Some servos have a rubber boot strain relief around the wire coming from the servo. Notch the bottom of the servo rails shown in Figures 5.1 and 5.2 to clear the rubber root or wire if required.   
 
10.17.1.2.9. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Trim Pieces - Test before Cleaning

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20030321 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

The factory has supplied a number of trim pieces. Many of these pieces such as the chin blocks on either side of the fuselage near the cowl and the spats on the main landing gear legs have been pre-applied and painted with epoxy paint. Always test these painted surfaces for compatibitliy with any fuels, solvents or cleaning solutions. Review and follow our recommendations regarding cleaning your model.
 
10.17.1.3. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Important Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.17.1.3.1. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Covering

This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering

POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
10.17.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.17.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.17.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.17.2. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.17.3. VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.17.3.1. Logo VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS
10.17.3.1.1. Logo (CMYK_TIF) VMA-D260X Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS
10.17.3.2. Pictures VMA-D260D Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Military
10.17.3.2.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-D260D Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Military
10.17.3.3. Pictures VMA-D260Z Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Civilian
10.17.3.3.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-D260D Dornier DO27 45-61 ARF ECS - Civilian
10.18. VMA-D290Z Dornier DO27 120+ Semiscale ARF
10.18.1. VMA-D290Z Dornier DO27 120+ Semiscale ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.19. VMA-E0014 Extra 300L 40-46 ARF ECS Sport
10.19.1. VMA-E0014 Extra 300L 40-46 ARF - Read Me First

Please see guidance attached.pdf.

10.19.2. VMA-E0014 Extra 300L 40-46 ARF - Parts, Options and Accessories
10.20. VMA-D310X DO335 1240/300 Twin EP ARF ECS Electric - Various Colors
Technical Information related to the VMAR DO335 1240/300 Twin EP ARF ECS Electric
 
Notification Service - Subscribe Now
For automated update notifications please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service
 
10.20.1. VMA-D310X DO335 1240/300 Twin EP ARF ECS Electric - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.21. VMA-ETS120 Model Engine Test Stand
10.21.1. Firewalls Not Tight on VMA-ETS120 Model Engine Test Stand

We have received a some feedback re the firewalls on the VMAR Model Engine Test Stand being loose. This is a hazardous situation and users are cautioned to ensure that the Firewalls are not loose and do not become loose during operation.

Resolution:

In Brief: Review the safety instructions in the instruction book. Wear eye protection and stay well clear of the propellor and ahead of the propeller. See Page 10 Section 3.2.2 of the instruction book and note the importance of keeping the firewalls fitting SNUGLY between the steel beams. Tighten the bolts, apply the extra locking nuts to each bolt and check bolt and firewall tightness frequently. Reduce vibration.

In Detail: Firstly review the safety instructions. Wear eye protection and stay well clear of the propellor and ahead of the propeller.  The cinch bolts should be firmly tightened during assembly and the extra locking nuts should be applied to help keep the bolts from backing off under vibration. Everything possible should be done to reduce vibration when running an engine in the test stand... balance the propellor and the spinner... tighten the engine hold down clamps and engine mount bolts and firmly screw or clamp the entire Model Engine Test Stand to a heavy bench or other suitable surface before operating. Check and watch for any loosening of the cinch bolts, locking nuts, engine clamps, firewalls or other fasteners. Stop the engine if anything appears to be loosening up or appears visually blurry when you are looking at it. Do NOT operate the engine test stand unattended!

 

10.21.2. VMA-ETS120 Model Engine Test Stand - Rust on Metal Parts
Question: I have bought a VMAR Engine Test Stand #VMA-ETS120. Some of the metal hardware appears to be rusty. Is this a problem? What should I do?
 
Answer: This item is sourced from a factory in Southeast Asia. The temperature and humidity in the tropics are both high and the combination of high temperature and high humidity creates surface rust on all ferrous materials even when they are treated with normal plating.
 
The rust is surface based only and does not affect the utility or longevity of the product. Remember that an engine test stand will normally be literally dripping with oil within a few minutes of first use.
 
If you wish to remove the rust, one simple trick is to put the metal parts in a sock or bag and wash them with dishwasher soap in a dishwasher. Do NOT use the dry cycle... wash only. Then remove the metal parts and dry them by hand using a paper towel. Any rust remaining on rods or flat metal plates can then be removed using a bit of sandpaper. Finally, use a few drops of WD40 or 3-in-1 Oil to lubricate the bolt threads and you will be good to go.
 
 
 
10.22. VMA-E160X Edge 540T 45-61 ARF ECS Sport

 

10.22.1. Parts Check Off List - Does not match Box contents

Question: I have a VMAR Edge 540T and I notice that the parts check off list for some of the minor hardware does not match what I received in the kit. What is going on?

Answer: The parts in the Edge 540T are correct but the checkoff list is wrong.

Better Answer: We fouled up when printing the instruction book. The instruction book is correct in and of itself but the component check off list was copied from a model without plug in wings. The Edge 540T has plug in wings and therefore some of the parts like the wing joiner, dowels etc are not required on this model and are not included.

10.22.2. Plastic Wing Root Pieces - To seal between the Fuselage and Wing Roots

Question: I found two plastic pieces that appear to match the shape of the wing roots. What are these for?

Answer: These are a bonus component that was added to this model. Usually they appear on one "sheet" of plastic and can be cut out and mounted by the modeler after assembly. These are wing root fairings or covers and serve to provide a cleaner seal between the wing roots and the sides of the fuselage. They can be cut a bit large initially and then trimmed to fit.

Supplementary Information: Are they absolutely necessary? No they are not. They provide a better seal and look nice but they are not mandatory for flight.

What adhesive should I use to mount these? Always test any adhesive on a small out of view area of any painted or plastic component before proceeding. We generally recommend Pacer Dap-A-Goo for this type of component in this type of application. Dap-A-Goo is a silicone like material that has a solvent base rather than acetic acid and it dries quickly, fuel proof, relatively clear and best of all it sticks to just about any plastic and stays slightly flexible. Remember... ALWAYS TEST FIRST!

10.23. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 40-52 & Electric ARF - Various Colors
10.23.1. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 40-52 & Electric ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below. 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.23.1.1. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 40-52 & Electric ARF - Aileron Horn Hole Location
Question: We have a VMAR Easy 3D and find that when we install the aileron servos and the aileron control horns they don't quite line up and the control rod ends up not quite perpendicular to the hinge line. Can we move the control horn slightly?
Answer: Yes. Simply redrill the control horn bolt holes so that your aileron control horn aligns better with your aileron servo arm. Depending on your servo arm length and the orientation of your servo you may wish to redrill the new horn bolt hole slightly inboard or slightly outboard of its original location.
 
To fill in the original hole use Epoxy or a short length of wood dowel.  
10.23.2. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 40-52 ARF ECS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.23.3. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF ECS - Using Glow Power
Question: Is the VMAR Easy 3D intended for electric or glow power? I would like to use glow power. Can this be done?
 
Answer: Although some Easy 3D's are produced with the assumption that glow power will be used, most are produced with electric power in mind. The airframe is the same in any event. Only the power systems vary.
 
To use glow power in an Easy 3D that was intended for electric power (i.e. it was not shipped with a fuel tank or glow power engine mount) please see the sub-article below to configure your Easy 3D for glow power using our Glow Engine Installation Pack (#VMA-E240XEIP) for the Easy 3D that includes a set of templates and the parts you require. The templates will also be helpful to modelers who are "going it alone" without our Installation Pack.
 
10.23.3.1. VMA-E240EIP Glow Engine Installation Pack for VMAR Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.23.3.1.1. VMA-E240EIP Glow Engine Installation Pack for VMAR Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.23.3.1.2. VMA-E240EIP Glow Engine Installation Pack for VMAR Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Important Information

When mounting your throttle servo you will need to install two mounting rails or a servo tray for the throttle servo. The Glow Engine Installation Pack does not include the rails or servo tray for the throttle servo.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.23.3.1.3. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Preparing for Glow Power - Templates
To prepare your Easy 3D for glow power, please review the Easy 3D Assembly and Operations Manual. Note in particular Step 14 Fitting the Fuel Tank and Step 15 Installing the Engine. Pictures 14D and 15A illustrate the engine mount, and power module firewall mounted at a 207 degree angle that works well for the VMAX 46PRO and VMAX 52PRO engines and other engines that have an beam mount spacing of approximately 1.53 in. (65 mm). (This is equivalent to a distance of 2.56 in. (65mm) between the outside faces of the beam mounts when clamped to the motor.)
 
In addition to an engine such as the VMAX 46PRO or 52PRO or similar two stroke engine you will require a fuel tank, two 7/32" diameter wooden dowels about 3.5 inches long, an engine mount (set of T-beams) and a piece of 3/16" plywood for the firewall. If you purchased the glow engine version of the Easy 3D you will find these parts included with your Easy 3D. If they were not included with your Easy 3D you will need to obtain these items either separately or as a set in our Glow Engine Installation Pack for the Easy 3D.
 
For reference, the individual parts are as follows (included in the Glow Engine Installation Pack #VMA-E240XEIP):
  • 3/16 in. Birch Plywood. (Metric 4 or 5 mm is acceptable)
  • 7/32 x 3.5 in. Round Dowels (5.5 mm). 1/4 in (6mm) can be used.
  • Fuel Tank #VMA-TANK3503
  • Engine Mount #RRC-MOUNTUNP.
  • Four #8 x 5/8 inch Button Head Sheet Metal Screws

You also will require Pacer ZAP-A-GAP CA+, a Glue Stick such as Super Glue Corp #SGC-GS88 and Pacer Dap-A-Goo or Silicone Sealer such as Super Glue Corp #SGC-THC. You may also require Pacer Finishing Resin and Pacer 30 Minute Epoxy.

We have prepared a set of templates to assist you with shaping the plywood firewall, installing the engine mount and modifying the fixed firewall at the front of the fuselage. These Templates are printed on sheets for cutout with scissors and are included with the Glow Engine Installation Pack for the Easy 3D. The Templates also can be downloaded from the attached file links below.
 
Please note that the Super Glue Corp Glue Stick #SGC-GS88 we have recommended contains a water soluble adhesive that is used to hold the templates into place. Once the work has been completed the templates can be peeled off and the adhesive removed from the wood surfaces using a moist cloth leaving a clean residue free surface.
 
For tools to make the job easier we suggest a fine toothed scroll saw, Dremel tool with drum sander, sandpaper, a drill or drill press and a set of drill bits.
  
10.23.3.1.4. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Make the Power Module Firewall
Please review Pictures 14D and 15A in the Easy 3D Assembly and Operations Manual. The power module firewall is the plywood piece that the engine "T-beam" mounts are attached to. The fuel tank is attached to the power module firewall and the fuel tank stopper and in/out tubes extend from the tank forward and through the power module firewall.
 
Use Template A.  Use scissors to trim to the outer perimeter of the power module firewall as shown on Template A. Attach the template to a suitably sized piece of good quality 3/16 inch plywood using a glue stick. You may wish to only attach the center and perimeter of the template to the firewall if you wish to more easily remove the template from your firewall later on.
 
Center punch the two holes marked A and the center hole at the intersection pont of all of the lines. Drill all three center punch locations with a 7/32" drill.
 
Use a scroll saw to cut the plywood to match the perimeter shape of the template.
 
Plywood with Template A - Before Cutting
 
Power Module Firewall - After Cutting
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10.23.3.1.5. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Align the Engine Mount (T-beams)
After completing the cutting and drilling of your power module firewall, review Pictures 14D and 15A in the Easy 3D Assembly and Operations Manual. 
 
Use Template B.  This template is used to position the T-beam engine mounts and subsequently drill the T-beam mounting holes in the power module firewall. This template is for the VMAX 46PRO, 52PRO and similar engines that mount on T-beams with approximately 1.53 in spacing (38mm) between the lug portion of the beams. If your engine mounting lugs require T-beam spacing that cannot work with 38mm spacing you can modify the template by cutting the template vertically along the center line and increasing or decreasing the distance between the resultant template halves to reflect the size of your engine.
 
The Template B sheet contains a expanded depiction of a typical T-beam mount and engine installation. Use scissors to cut out just the retangle bounded by the T-beam mounts as shown in Template B. Consult the pictures before cutting. You want to end up with Template B looking like the lighter (whiter) shaded paper shown in the pictures below.
 
Position the center point of Template B over the center line intersection point of Template A on the power module firewall. Rotate Template B 207 degrees counter clockwise from horizontal until the engine lug lines on Template B align with the corresponding diagonal lines (Z1 to Z1 and Z2 to Z2) shown on Template A attached earlier to the firewall. Ensure the center point of Template B remains centered over the fuel tank outlet hole while the lug line remains aligned diagonally. Secure Template B in this position using adhesive from a glue stick.    
 
Use a scroll saw to cut the fuel tank outlet clearance hole in the plywood as shown on the template. 
 
Center punch the four holes marked B. Drill all three center punch locations with a 5/32 inch drill. You can use a 3/16" drill if you wish to provide a bit looser tolerance. After drilling the holes, turn the firewall over and counter sink these four holes from the back of the wirewall using a 27/64 in. drill. Counter sink the holes to a depth of the thickness of a washer (approx 1-1.5mm) at the perimeter of the counter sunk holes.  
 
If you wish to seal the power module firewall, now is the time to do it. This is not mandatory but makes for a neater more professional looking finish. Remove the templates and wipe away any adhesive residue. Blow off any dust. Coat all surfaces with Pacer Finishing Resin. Set aside to cure.
 

Template B overlying and aligned with diagonal lines of Template A.

 
T-beam mounting holes drilled
 
Back view after T-beam mounting holes have been countersunk
 
10.23.3.1.6. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Install the Engine Mount (T-beams)
After aligning the engine mount T-beam mounting holes, you are ready to install the engine mounts.
 
Use four hex head 4mm bolts with washers under the heads. Insert the bolts through the firewall from the backside of the firewall. Position the T-beam mounts as shown in Pictures 14D and 15A in the Assembly and Operations Manual.
 
Loosely screw all four bolts through the firewall and though the T-beams and into 4 mm nuts before tightening any one bolt or nut. Once all bolts are inserted through firewall and the T-beams and engaged with the 4mm nuts, tighten the bolts and nuts snugly. Ensure the washers on the back side of the firewall sink down into the counter sink holes so that the outer surface of the washers are flush with the back surface of the power module firewall. Wait for 1 hour and then apply Pacer Z42 Blue Threadlocker to the nuts and the threads near the nuts. Retighten the bolts snugly.
 
Engine T-beam Mounts Installed - Back View
 
Engine T-beam Mounts Installed - Front View
 
 
10.23.3.1.7. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Install the Fuel Tank
After installing the engine mount T-beams and securing the nuts and bolts please review Step 14 in the Assembly and Operations Manual. Prepare your fuel tank per Step 14 and the associated pictures.
 
From the back of the firewall, insert the two 7/32 x 3.5 inch dowels into the 7/32 dowel holes drilled using Template A. If you are using 1/4 in. dowels, redrill the holes to 1/4" inside diameter. Insert the dowels only to the point where their forward ends are flush with the forward face of the firewall. You may wish to tap the dowels into the holes using a small hammer. Carefully study the tank tubes and alignment before proceeding. Make sure you know which tube is for what and which way around the tank is. Using Pacer Dap-A-Goo, glue the tank to the dowels and seal both sides of the tank black rubber gasket and tank neck and metal safety ring into place in the firewall center hole. Protect the tubes with tape while sealing. Hold the tank in place with masking tape until the sealant cures. Wick Pacer ZAP-A-GAP CA+ into the dowel holes from the front side of the firewall.

Set aside and let all adhesives and sealants cure.
 

Fuel Tank Installed - Back View

Fuel Tank Installed - Front View

 
10.23.3.1.8. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Modify the Fixed Firewall in the Fuselage.
Use Template C. Use scissors to trim to the outer perimeter of the fuselage as shown on Template C. Cut out the inner area of Template C that is bound by the black line. The black line denotes the fixed firewall installed by the factory for electric power systems. Carefully, center, align and attach template C to the forward face of the fixed firewall of the fuselage using adhesive from a glue stick.
 
Use a Dremel tool and sanding drum to carve away the fixed firewall to match the red line perimeter of Template C. Work in small steps and test the fit of your power module assembly frequently. Continue carving in small steps with frequent test fits until the fuel tank can be easily inserted into the fuselage from the front and the back face of the power module firewall can be pressed flush against the forward face of the fixed firewall while the power module firewall is centered and aligned.
 

Template C Applied to Firewall. Black Outline Represents Factory Cutout for Electric Power System. Use Drum Sander to Expand Cutout to Perimeter Denoted by Red Line.

Firewall After Cutting to Red Line

 
10.23.3.1.9. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Temporarily Attach the Power Module to the Fuselage.
Use two button head sheet metal screws to temporarily hold the power module centered and flush fitted to the front of the fuselage. This will enable you to attach the engine and check the cowl and muffler fit before completing the permanent installation of the power module firewall. We strongly suggest drilling pilot holes for the screws to prevent splitting wood in the fuselage.   
 
10.23.3.1.10. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Install Engine, Cowl, Muffler, Spinner & Throttle Control
See Step 15 of the Assembly and Operations Manual to install your engine, cowl, muffler and spinner. Use a Dremel drum sander and sharp scissors to cut out the cowl to fit your engine. Use Template D as a guide for cutting the cowl. Install your muffler and check the muffler clearances through the cowl and around the fuselage. Use an exhaust stack extender if necessary to enable the muffler to clear the fuselage.
 
See Step 19 of the Assembly & Operations Manual for routing and connection of the Throttle Control.
 

Cowl After Cutting - View From Front Lower Right Quarter

10.23.3.1.11. VMA-E240X Easy 3D 45-52 ARF - Finalize Attachment of the Power Module to the Fuselage.
After test fitting your engine, cowl, muffler and spinner you are ready to finalize the attachment of the power module to the fuselage.
 
There are two general ways to go about this, removeable or non-removeable.
 
If you want to be able to remove the power module for maintenance etc in the future we suggest using four button head sheet metal screws (four #8 x 5/8 Robertson screws provided). Use screws that are just long enough to go through the firewalls but not protrude into the fuel tank area. Choose the screw down points carefully to pick good solid widely distributed areas. Drill pilot holes through both firewalls being careful not to nick or hole the fuel tank.
 
Wick Pacer ZAP CA into the holes in the fuselage to toughen them up.
 
Firmly attach the power module to the fuselage using the screws.
 
If you want to permanently attach the power module to the fuselage, use Pacer 30 Minute ZEPOXY. Apply plenty of ZEPOXY to both the power module firewall and the fixed firewall. Flush the firewalls together ensuring that everything is aligned properly. Hold in place with masking tape or screws for several hours.
 
Clean away excess expoxy before it cures.
 
10.23.3.1.12. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.23.3.1.12.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.23.3.1.13. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.24. VMA-E260X Extra 330L 45-61 ARF ECS Sport
10.24.1. VMA-E260X Extra 330L 45-61 ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.24.2. VMA-E260X Extra 330L 45-61 ARF - CG - Where is it located? Is the manual correct?

Question: Where is the CG located on the VMAR Extra 330L 45-60 ARF ECS?

Answer: In stage 29 on page 15 of the manual there is a diagram and information as follows: The CG is located 4.75-5.25 inches (120-130 mm) back from the leading edge of the wing. This information is correct.

Additional Information: This is an aerobatic model. It is designed for aerobatics and is inherently less stable than a high wing trainer. The CG location affects its ability to do aerobatics. Setting the CG further forward will make the model more stable (easier to fly) but will limit it's ability to do aerobatics. Flyers who are unfamiliar with flying an Extra 330L OR who wish to test the model initially in a more stable configuration may wish to move the CG further forward for the first few flights. The CG can be moved ahead to lie up to 1/2" (12 mm) forward of the thickest part of the wing. This will be a more stable less aerobatically capable configuration. After becoming confident and more familiar with the flying characteristics the CG can be moved further aft towards the recommended location.

10.24.3. VMA-E260X Extra 330L 45-61 ARF - Plastic Wing Root Pieces - What are they for?

Question: I found two plastic pieces that appear to match the shape of the wing roots. What are these for?

Answer: These are a bonus component that was added to this model. Usually they appear on one "sheet" of plastic and can be cut out and mounted by the modeler after assembly. These are wing root fairings or covers and serve to provide a cleaner seal between the wing roots and the sides of the fuselage. They can be cut a bit large initially and then trimmed to fit.

Supplementary Information: Are they absolutely necessary? No they are not. They provide a better seal and look nice but they are not mandatory for flight.

What adhesive should I use to mount these? Always test any adhesive on a small out of view area of any painted or plastic component before proceeding. We generally recommend Pacer Dap-A-Goo for this type of component in this type of application. Dap-A-Goo is a silicone like material that has a solvent base rather than acetic acid and it dries quickly, fuel proof, relatively clear and best of all it sticks to just about any plastic and stays slightly flexible. Remember... ALWAYS TEST FIRST!

10.24.4. VMA-E260X Extra 330L 45-61 ARF - Template for Cowl Decal Placement
When placing the decals on the VMA-E260X Extra 330L cowl it may be helpful to use the template provided below as an attachment.
 
10.25. VMA-E340X Escape 40-52 ARF ECS Low Wing Trainer - Various Colors

Question: I am about to install the vertical stabilizer into my Escape. I find that when I am dry fitting and testing the installation of the vertical stabilizer before gluing that the rudder prevents full deflection of the elevator. The notch in the rudder that is intended to provide sufficent clearance appears to be slightly too high when viewed with the model top side up. What do I do?

Answer: This is a problem on some early production Escapes produced prior to 20050426. Enlarge the clearance slot in the rudder by about 1/8" expanding it downwards. This should be done BEFORE the vertical stabilizer is installed. Do NOT modify the elevator. See more information below.

More Information: See the attached picture. The Red tinted area should be cut away using a very sharp #11 blade OR preferably a powered fine blade scroll saw. Remove only about half of what is shown in the red tinted area and then do another trial fit. Only cut away more if you have to. Do NOT exceed the size of the red tinted area which as shown denotes removing a total of about 1/8" of material to expand the bottom limit of the cut out in the rudder.

After expanding the clearance hole in the rudder, wick thin CA such as ZAP CA from PACER into the wood edges of the cutout. Let the CA soak well into the wood. Do two applications. This will stiffen and significantly strengthen the wood. Now remove the covering from the pre-drilled rudder control horn hole represented by the blue circle in the picture (hold the rudder up to a light source to illuminate the hole if cannot locate it). Once the covering has been removed from both sides of the hole, wick thin CA into the edges of the hole. Let the CA soak well into the wood. Do two applications.

After the wood has been reinforced with CA, install the rudder control horn. Note carefully which way around you want to do this. Make sure that you have the control horn coming out the correct side of the rudder so that it connects to the rudder control rod. Seat the control horn firmly into the hole. You want a snug fit but do not overtighten. Remember that this is a model airplane not a Sherman Tank... no pipe wrenches please! After you have installed the control horn, again check that is correctly positioned and that it engages with the rudder control rod. Only after you are satisfied that the control horn is correctly positioned and snugly tight, then wick more CA or even better CA+ down the sides of the white T nut that is on the opposite side of the rudder. You want to fill any gap in the hole around the T-Nut so that there is one integral bond between the T-nut and the wood surrounding it.

Now you are ready to use 30 Minute Epoxy to glue the vertical stabilizer into place AFTER you do one more check on alignment, clearances etc.  

What to do if you have already glued the Vertical Stabilizer into place before you noticed the lack of clearance? Well it would have been best to check things out during the dry fit before you glued it into place BUT all is not lost. Review the information above and the picture attached. Then do what is described but you have to do the modification "in situ" i.e. in place. It's the same procedure just a bit more difficult to manage. Go slowing and carefully and use a shart #11 blade.

10.26. VMA-F210X Fournier RF4D 2000 ARF ECS Electric - Various Colors
Technical Information related to the VMAR Fournier RF4D 2000 ARF ECS Electric
 
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10.26.1. VMA-F210X Fournier RF4D 2000 ARF ECS Electric - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.27. VMA-F32X07X Floats 40 ARF for 05-09 lbs (40-60) Models
10.27.1. What is the difference between the various versions of the 05-09lb float sets. How to Adapt?

Question: What is the difference between F32W07 and F32W07B or the difference between F32Y07 and F32Y07B?


Answer: The Floats are the same except for the color. The forward mounting bracket on the "B" version of the floats was designed to fit the early versions of the Beaver 40-60 ARF built prior to 20050101. These brackets have a three hole mounting system to match three pre-drilled holes in the bottom of the Beaver 40-60 ARF fuselage.

Since 20050101 the Beaver 40-60 ARF has four holes predrilled in the bottom of the fuselage for the standard main gear set that comes with the Beaver 40-60 ARF. The spacing of the holes in the bottom of the fuselage may not match the holes in the mounting bracket that comes with your floats. If it matches, you are good to go... if it does not match, four new holes will have to be drilled... this is not a big job if you follow the procedure outlined below.

Procedure:

Remove the forward mounting bracket from the float box. Turn the fuselage upside down and locate the pre-drilled holes in the bottom of the fuselage. Hold the mounting bracket with the flat non-tapered edge facing the engine end of the fuselage. Check the holes in the bracket vs the holes in the fuselage. If they match, attach the bracket to the fuselage with the screws provided. If they do not match, carefully center the mounting bracket and mark the location of the bracket holes on the fuselage using a ball point pen. Remove the bracket and examine the four pen marks. Plug the factory drilled holes in the fuselage with clear or white silicone. Use a 3/32" drill bit to make four new holes in the fuselage at the loction of the pen marks. 

Turn the fuselage upright and note the location of the four new holes in the landing gear flat plate in the bottom of the fuselage.  Locate the extra flat plate provided with the floats. Epoxy this plate into place inside the fuselage on top of the four holes you drilled. Let the Epoxy dry. Now turn the fuselage back over and drill the four holes again.

Attach the front bracket for the floats (flat non-tapered edge facing forward) to the fuselage with the four screws provided.

10.27.2. Floats - Hard Point Area... Can it be Moved?
Question: I want to adapt the VMAR Floats to fit on my model. Can I move the hard point attachment locations on the floats?
 

Answer: The hard point attachment points on the floats should not be moved. If you need to change the relative position of the floats with respect to your model (to position the step with respect to the CG for example) we recommend adding or relocating hard point locations within the fuselage of the model rather than modifying the floats.
 
 
10.28. VMA-F490X Phantom II 60-90 Jet (Prop) ARF 3DS - USAF and USN
10.28.1. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Balancing for Correct CG Location - Adding Weight

Question: Should I expect to add weight to the VMAR Phantom in order to have the CG in the correct location? If I must add weight, where will it normally go and how much do you think I will need?

Answer: This will depend on the weight of your engine, servos, receiver and in particular the weight and location of your airborne battery pack.  

Additional Information: The VMAR Phantom accomodates two stroke engines in the .60-.91 size range. As of 2005, engines in this class are often built from the same casing and although the crankshaft may be a bit heavier in a .91 the case is a bit lighter. Hence, in many brands there is not much of a weight difference between a .60 and a .91 two stroke engine. Many popular engines in this class weigh, with muffler, approximately 24 oz.

Radio receivers generally do not vary in weight much between brands. Servos can vary in weight from servo to servo(ball bearing heavy duty servos weigh more than standard servos) and airborne battery packs can be significantly different depending on their voltage and mAh capacity.

Experience with a variety of standard servos, 4.8V-6.0V nicad packs and .60-.91 size two stroke engines weighing approximately 24 oz with muffler has shown that for first flights 6-8 oz of weight in the tail is needed for a CG location that is somewhat nose heavy. After first flights moving the CG back slightly within the recommended range may be desired and require 10-12 ounces of weight in the tail.

These guidelines are NOT considered to be suitable for all situations. If your engine is heavier than 24 ounces, you may need more weight in the tail. If you are using a 6.0V 2000 mAh airborne battery located in the aft end of the model you may need less additional weight in the tail than if you are using a 4.8V 600mAh battery. Each model should be carefully checked for CG and compared with the recommended CG location. First flights should be slightly nose heavy (forward CG location) and no model should be flown with a CG outside the recommended range.

10.28.2. VMA-F490X Dummy Fuel Tanks - Is it Ok to Fly with them?

Question: I have the VMAR Phantom 90+ ARF. The Phantom comes with set of Dummy Wing Tanks. Is it OK to fly the Phantom with the Dummy Wing Tanks in place?

Answer: Yes they are airworthy and you can fly the Phantom with the Dummy Wing Tanks in place.

10.28.3. VMA-F490X Electric Power? Can it be done?
F490X - Electric Power
 Question? Can the Phantom be modified to use Electric Power? I

If so....any suggestion as for Electric motor types and sizes?
 Answer? We have not given electrics any consideration in this model to date. It was designed and tested around .60-.91 two stroke glow engines only.

Additional Information: We are not aware of any particular reason why it could not be done using LiPo batteries and a high output brushless motor but have no information and have done no testing.

 

10.28.4. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Engine Sizes - Will it fly OK on a .60?

Question: Will the VMAR Phantom II fly OK on a .60? What do you recommend?

Answer: We recommend a .60 to .91 two stroke engine. Yes it flys well on a .61. A .75-.91 would be the best overall choice... .91 is the max and a bit over the top but favored by flyers who like power. Anything larger than a .91 will require considerable work on the fuselage nose section and you run the risk of detracting from the scale like appearance if you butcher the nose area. This model is NOT intended to accomodate four stroke engines.

Please note that we have NOT tested this model with two strokes larger than a .91 and have NOT tested this model with four strokes. We recommend the use of a .60 to .91 two stroke engine for this model. We are not able to endorse the use of two stroke engines larger than a .91 or the use of four stroke engines for this model.

 

10.28.5. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Exhaust Outlets - Fit
Question: Do I trim the open end of the exhaust outlets to fit over the factory installed "circles" that are attached to the rear of the fuselage?
 
Answer: Yes. The circles are 3-1/8 inches (79 mm) in diameter. When trimming the open end of the exhaust outlets to fit over these circles, trim any flashing away in small steps. If you over do it, the diameter of the exhaust cones will end up being 3 inches in diameter or less and will not fit over the factory installed mounting circles. If you do over  trim the exhaust outlets the easiest way to resolve this is use a magic marker to black out the edge of the factory circles and then cut new circles to match the inside diameter of your trimmed down exhaust outlets. Once you have cut new smaller circles glue the new circles in place on top of the factory installed circles so that they are centered within the circumference of the factory circles.
10.28.6. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Oleo Strut Sets - Are They Available?

Question: Are there oleo strut sets available for the VMAR Phantom II 60-91 ARF? Are they actually functional or just dummies?

Answer:  The VMAR Phantom II 60-91 ARF comes standard with fixed gear and we offer a set of oleo struts (3) for this model. Yes they are functional and easy to install. They are well made, work well, look very scale like and help protect your model from damage by sucking up hard landings and rough fields. These oleo strut sets are very economical and we offer them at a very low combo price to anyone buying them with the Phantom. See the VMAR On Line store at www.richmondrc.com . Look just below the Jets listing in the left frame. 

This combo offer is open to all owners of VMAR Phantom II 60-90 ARF's until the end of 2006... regardless of when or where the model  was purchased.  

For oleo strut installation instructions please click the following: Installation Tips - VMA-OLEOxxx Oleo Strut Sets  [New Window]

10.28.7. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Retract Recommendations

Question: If I want to install optional retracts in the VMAR Phantom II 60-91 ARF which retracts should I use?

Answer:  The VMAR Phantom II 60-91 ARF comes standard with fixed gear and it is ready to accept Robart mechanical retracts. Robart #608HD main gear retracts and the Robart #610 nose gear retract have been installed and tested in this model. Other brands of medium duty retracts can, with work be fitted. Please see the instructions that come with your retracts for specific installation instructions and requirements.  

10.28.8. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Retract Servo Requirements

Question: How many servos are needed if I want to install optional mechanical retracts in the VMAR Phantom II 60-91 ARF?

Answer: 2 standard servos for the mains and 1 standard servo for the nose gear. We recommend the use of Airtronics servos.

 

10.28.9. VMA-F490X Phantom II - Rudder Control Rod - Fit

Question: Is the control rod in the rudder of the VMAR Phantom II supposed to be a very tight fit or a slightly loose fit?

Answer: The control rod in the rudder of the VMAR Phantom II is intended to have a slightly loose fit until the vertical stabilizer is installed into the fuselage per the assembly and operations manual. Once installed per the manual, the control rod will have a tighter fit. After installation, always ensure that the control rod and rudder move freely with a standard servo.

10.29. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF 3DS - Camo & Grey
10.29.1. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

 
LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.29.1.1. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - General Information
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.29.1.2. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Supplement to the Manual
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.29.1.2.1. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 ARF - Control Horns

 

Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

10.29.1.2.2. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 ARF - Elevator Servo Mounts
PLEASE NOTE:
 
Before installing your elevator servos, ensure that the elevator servo mounts are securely attached to the surface of the horizontal stabilizer..
If the mounts appear to have been factory installed, you should consider the mounts to be only tacked into place to indicate positioning. Carefully secure the servo mounts to the horizontal stabilizer using 30 minute epoxy or good quality medium CA+ such as ZAP-A-GAP.
10.29.1.3. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Important Information
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.29.1.3.1. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Covering

This model uses VCOTE2 - 3DS Covering

VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE2 - 3DS is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE2 - 3DS is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE2 - 3DS, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE2 - 3DS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE2 - 3DS, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13 bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE2 - 3DS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.  

 

10.29.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.29.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.29.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.29.2. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below. 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.29.2.1. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Missile Set - Is it Included?

Question: Does a dummy missile set come with the VMAR F5E?

Answer: Yes, a dummy missile set comes with the VMAR F5E. 

10.29.2.2. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Oleo Struts - Available or Not?

Question: Does the VMAR F5E support the use of functional Oleo Struts?

Answer: Yes. The VMAR F5E supports the use of functional Oleo Struts. The VMAR Oleo Strut set  is #VMA-OLEO2S3. The Oleo Strut set includes two oleos for the main gear and one for the nose. It also includes the wheels, axles and wheel retainers.

10.29.2.3. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Retract Ready?

Question: Is the VMAR F5E retract ready?

Answer:  Yes the VMAR F5E is retract ready. We include nicely machined fixed gear and have pre-arranged the structure to accomodate easy installation of third party retracts.
10.29.2.4. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Retract Recommendations?

Question: If I want to install optional retracts in the VMAR F5E Tiger II 60-91 ARF which retracts should I use?

Answer:  The VMAR F5E Tiger II 60-91 ARF comes standard with fixed gear and it is ready to accept Robart mechanical retracts. Robart #608HD main gear retracts and the Robart #610 nose gear retract have been installed and tested in this model. Other brands of medium duty retracts can, with work be fitted. Please see the instructions that come with your retracts for specific installation instructions and requirements.  

10.29.3. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.29.4. VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.29.4.1. Logo VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF
10.29.4.1.1. Logo (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F590X F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF
10.29.4.2. Pictures VMA-F590G F5E Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Gray
10.29.4.2.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F590G F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Gray
10.29.4.3. Pictures VMA-F590U F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Camo
10.29.4.3.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F590U F5E Tiger II 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Camo
10.30. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 JET (PROP) ARF 3DS - Blue & Navy
10.30.1. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.30.1.1. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.30.1.2. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Supplement to the Manual
COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.30.1.2.1. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-90 ARF - Control Horns

 

Control Horn Installation - How to

Question: How are VMAR control horns installed? 

Answer: VMAR control horns are unique. They work better and are easier to install. They do not look like most of the control horns you have seen before and you may not recognize them for what they are or you may think they are missing. They are in the control horn parts bag &/or wing parts bag  inside the master bag of hardware and consist of a metal bolt, metal nut, beveled white plastic washer, a white plastic T-nut and the white plastic control horn itself that connects to a clevis or rod.

The iillustration below and to the left shows a control horn set before installation. Note 5 parts make up the set. In Light Duty applications the Metal Nut may not be included and only 4 parts will make up the set. The illustration below and to the right shows a control horn set partially installed. Although illustrations in various manuals show the bevelled washer with the bevel pointing away from the surface we find that we get a cleaner strong installation with the bevel pointing inwards.

We recommend wicking thin CA such as Pacer ZAP/CA (Pink) into the exposed wood surrounding the hole in the control surface. This helps further strengthen the wood. This is not a requirement but if you are pushing the power limits or planning on extreme aerobatics or speeds, the extra strength could come in handy. Use two applications of thin CA 1 minute apart, BEFORE installing the control horn.

The illustration below shows horn side view of a control horn set fully installed. The illustration to the left is a lighter duty application without the metal nut. The illustration to the right shows a heavier duty application with the metal nut installed. If the metal nuts have been supplied with the horns, we recommend using them.  

10.30.1.2.2. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-90 ARF - Horizontal Stabilizer Fit - Page 6, Figure 6D

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20060822 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 6, Figure 6D.

Figure 6D shows the fitting of the horizontal stabilizers into the horizontal stabilizer slots in the side aft section of the fuselage.

The horizontal stabilizers fit into the slots in the fuselage and are to be seated securely into their respective fuselage slots in the same manner for both the left and right horizontal stabilizers. The distances shown in Figure 6D of the 20060822 version of the manual are incorrect. The "leading edge" distance (bottommost in the picture) should be approximately 16.14 in. (410 mm) and the "hinge line" distance (uppermost in the picture) should be approximately 13.31 in. (338 mm). These distances may vary slightly in production. The important point to note here is that the two horizontal stabilizers should be seated securely into their respective fuselage slots in the same manner for both the left and and right horizontal stabilizers.

The actual distances are not as critical as the requirements that:

  • Both horizontal stabilizers be securely inserted into their respective fuselage slots,
  • Both horizontal stabilizers are angled so that they are both oriented in a similar manner, and
  • Both elevators move freely without binding.  

 

10.30.1.2.3. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-90 ARF - Vertical Stabilizer Fit - Page 5, Figure 5C

This supplementary information applies to manuals with a copyright date of 20060822 (see back cover). Manuals having later copyright dates may already reflect this supplementary information.

Please see Page 5, Figure 5C.

Step 5.1 and Figure 5C describe and show the dry test fitting of the vertical stabilizers into the vertical stabilizer slots in the top aft section of the fuselage.

The vertical stablizers fit into the slots in the fuselage and are to be seated securely into their respective fuselage slots in the same manner for both the left and right vertical stabilizers. The distances shown in Figure 5C of the 20060822 version of the manual are incorrect. The "leading edge" distance (rightmost in the picture) should be approximately 13.58 in. (345 mm) and the "hinge line" distance (leftmost in the picture) should be approximately 11.02 in. (280 mm). These distances may vary slightly in production. The important point to note here is that the two vertical stabilizers should be seated securely into their respective fuselate slots in the same manner for both the left and and right vertical stabilizers.

The actual distances are not as critical as the requirements that:

  • Both vertical stabilizers be securely inserted into their respective fuselage slots,
  • Both vertical stabilizers are angled so that they are both oriented in a similar manner, and
  • Both rudders move freely without binding.  

 

10.30.1.3. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Important Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.30.1.3.1. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Covering

This model uses VCOTE2 - 3DS Covering

VCOTE2-3DS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of VCOTE2 - 3DS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips and at www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") we have an expanded explanation for each of these Tips.

VCOTE2 - 3DS is a proprietary covering system engineered in Canada & available only from VMAR. Please note that VCOTE2 - 3DS is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. As with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering so its important to read the Tips over FIRST. Whatever you want to do with VCOTE2 - 3DS, test it on a small out of the way area first.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to VCOTE2 - 3DS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the VCOTE2 - 3DS, work outdoors and after testing first on a small out of the way area, use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Alcohol over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Avoid raw fuel with nitro content higher than 15%. Dab away all raw fuel regardless of nitro content. Test a small out of the way area and all plastics first before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing, peal tape back on itself so that the pulling is parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13 bigger) on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a heat gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use a heat gun and soft cotton cloth or glove and hand pressure to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates. Consult our Knowledge Base for further information.
  • Tools for Working with VCOTE2 - 3DS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.  

 

10.30.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.30.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.30.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.30.2. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below. 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.30.2.1. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Missile Set - Is it Included?

Question: Does a dummy missile set come with the VMAR F18?

Answer: A dummy missile set comes with the Navy Version of the VMAR F18. The Blue Angels version does NOT come with a missile set. The Blue Angels version is modeled after the aircraft used by the Blue Angels precision flying team where missiles are not permitted.

10.30.2.2. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Oleo Struts - Available or Not?

Question: Does the VMAR F18 support the use of functional Oleo Struts?

Answer: Yes. The VMAR F18 includes VMAR Oleo Strut set  #VMA-OLEO6S3. These are included with the kit and available as aftermarket replacements. The Oleo Strut set includes two oleos for the main and one for the nose. It also includes the wheels, axles and wheel retainers.

10.30.2.3. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Oleo Strut Nose Gear - Functional or Not?

Question: Is the steerable nose gear assembly for the VMAR F18 actually a functional Oleo strut?

Answer: Yes. In fact the steerable nose gear assembly for the VMAR F18 incorporates two functional Oleos: 

  • The regular Oleo dampens shock in the vertical axis.
  • The brace Oleo dampens longitudinal shock and limits the aft deflection of the nose gear  
10.30.2.4. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Oleo Strut Nose Gear - Steerable or Not?

Question: Is the Oleo Strut on the nose of the VMAR F18 steerable?

Answer: Yes the Oleo Strut for the nose gear of the VMAR F18 is steerable.

10.30.2.5. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Retract Ready?

Question: Is the VMAR F18 retract ready?

Answer: No the VMAR F18 is not retract ready. The F18 is a very unique design and we could not find any retract makers who had an economical reliable retract suitable for this model.

In theory a very skilled modeller could possibly adapt retract equipment available in the market to fit into the VMAR F18 and/or a machinist could make a set of retracts and then modify the VMAR F18 to accept them. This is a great deal of work and may not lead to a workable solution.

We do supply a set of functional Oleo Struts (3) for the VMAR F18 that work well and look very scale like.

10.30.2.6. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Tail Numbers - Blue Angels

Question: We have a VMAR F18 in Blue Angels schema at our field. It flies great and a few of us are thinking of forming a flying team using this model. Is it possible to get different tail numbers?

Answer: Yes. The VMAR F18 Blue Angels tail numbers range from 1 to 6. 

  • They are randomly stocked and we may not be able to guarantee the availability of a specific tail number at all times.
  • If you have a preference, let us know and we will try to get you what you are looking for from our stock.
  • If we don't have your preferred number let us know if an alternative will do.
  • Lastly, if you are willing to wait for our next shipment from the factory, tell us and we will custom order your F18 with your specified tail number on it.
10.30.3. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.30.4. VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.30.4.1. Logo VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF
10.30.4.1.1. Logo (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F690X F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF
10.30.4.2. Pictures VMA-F690B F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Blue Angels
10.30.4.2.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F690B F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Blue Angels
10.30.4.3. Pictures VMA-F690N F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Navy
10.30.4.3.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-F690N F18 Hornet 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Navy
10.31. VMA-H240X Hornet 40-52 ARF ECS Sport Trainer+

 

10.31.1. VMA-H240X Hornet 40-52 ARF ECS Sport Trainer+ - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.31.2. VMA-H240X Hornet 40-52 ARF ECS Sport Trainer+ - Fuel Tank - How to install

Question: How do I install the Fuel Tank into my VMAR Hornet 40-52ARF?

Answer: This is not difficult but the instruction book does not cover this directly.

Do the fuel tank setup first. Install the internal tubing and clunk(s). When the stopper has been tightened but not overtightened, install pieces of fuel tubing between or over the ends of the metal pipes to seal them against dirt and debris. Mark the back of the tank with an arrow pointing up so that you can clearly see which way the tank is to be positioned in the model.

Remove the black sealing gasket from the fuel tank. Apply sealant such as Pacer Dap-A-Goo to the front face of the tank around the neck and re-install the gasket. Apply more sealant to the front face of the gasket.

Insert the tank into the fuel tank compartment with the tubes forward and oriented so that the top of the tank is positioned correctly. Press the tank firmly against the back side of the firewall and secure in place while the sealant cures.

From the engine mount area, apply more sealant around the neck of the fuel tank working from the front of the fuselage.

When the sealant has dried, support the tank with sponge foam around the sides and bottom of the tank. You may wish to install your battery pack beneath or behind the tank before inserting the sponge foam.

10.31.3. VMA-H240X Hornet 40-52 ARF ECS Sport Trainer+ - Maximum Engine Size without modifying fuselage or engine mounts?

Question: What is the maximum engine size that can be mounted on the VMAR Hornet 40-52 ARF without modifying the fuselage or engine mounts?

Answer: The Maximum engine size is a .52 2 stroke or about a .70 four stroke provided that it will physically fit.

Better Answer: We can only endorse the use of engines up to .52 2 stroke in size or other engine types such as a 4 stroke having similar power.

The specifications on the engine mounts are as follows:


Engine Mount Engine Width Max: 1.3 in. (32 mm)
Engine Mount Engine Lug Length Max using Factory drilled holes: .7 in. (18.5 mm)

Engine Mount Engine Lug Length Max if using Custom drilled holes: 1.5 in. (39 mm)
Engine Mount T-Bar Beam Length Max: 2.9 in. (74 mm)

 

10.31.4. VMA-H240X Hornet 40-52 ARF ECS Sport Trainer+ - Servo Cavity for Aileron - Missing

Question: My VMAR Hornet ARF does not appear to have a cavity for the Aileron Servo. What should I do?

Answer: This is a manufacturing glitch that occurred on a few models produced in late 2006 and early 2007. The cavity is in fact there but the skin has not been trimmed away after covering.

This is easy to fix and takes about one minute per wing. Here is what to do:
 
  1. The cavity is to be 11 mm wide x 40 mm long in each wing. When the wings are joined, the cavity will be 22 mm wide x 40 mm long. This will accomodate major brand "standard" servos.
  2. Examine each wing root.
  3. The cavity is bounded at the front (towards leading edge of the wing) by the triangle stock adjacent to the wing spar joiner channel and bounded on the rear (towards the trailing edge of the wing) by a strip of "rail" hardwood. You can see the triangle stock and the rail strip from the wing roots. 
  4. Carefully cut away the balsa skin that lies over the cavity between the triangle stock and the rail strip. Each cut out will be approximately 11mm wide and 40 mm long.
  5. Test the cutout to ensure it will accomodate your standard servo. Trim to fit accordingly.
 
 
10.32. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Various Colors
Technical Information related to the VMAR JU52 Trimotor 64 in. ARF ECS. 
 
Notification Service - Subscribe Now
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10.32.1. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - READ ME FIRST

PLEASE READ ME FIRST

BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ASSEMBLE OR OPERATE THIS PRODUCT

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER & COPYRIGHT NOTICE

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER

The authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product expressly disclaim any warranties or representations, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties of fitness, accuracy, timeliness or applicability of the information and/or product provided here. In no event will the authors and/or suppliers and/or disseminaters of this information and/or product have any obligation arising from contract or tort, for loss of revenue or profit, or for indirect, special, incidental, consequential or other damages of any sort arising from this information and/or product. In using this information and/or product, the user accepts all responsibility for and all liability associated with such use.

PROCEEDING WITH THE USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND/OR PRODUCT INDICATES AGREEMENT WITH AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.
 
Please Note the following Caution

CAUTION

A Remote Control (RC) model aircraft is not a toy. It is a flying model that functions much like a full size airplane. If you do not assemble and operate model aircraft properly you can cause injury to yourself and others and damage property. DO NOT FLY a model aircraft unless you are qualified.

You are ultimately responsible for the mechanical, aeronautical and electrical integrity of any model you fly and all of the components that make up the model including but not limited to the airframe itself, control surfaces, hinges, linkages, covering, engine, motor, radio, servos, switches, wiring, battery and parts. Check all components before and after each flight. It is essential that you act with the clear understanding that you are solely responsible for all aspects of the model at all times. DO NOT FLY until it is right.  

 

10.32.1.1. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - General Information

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
Tips for Avoiding Common Problems

We have supplied thousands and thousands and thousands of model aircraft in the past 20 plus years. We're not bragging! We tell you this to give some credibility to our suggested list of tips that follow. In talking to modelers around the world, here is what we have found is the key to... 

AVOIDING 90% of PROBLEMS that can arise:  

  1. READ THE CAUTION ABOVE & READ THE LIABILITY DISCLAIMER.You are responsible for all aspects of any model you fly. You're It!
  2. READ ALL DOCUMENTATION before doing anything else! 
  3. INSPECT CAREFULLY immediately upon arrival!.
  4. RETAIN ALL PACKAGING until the checkout is complete! If you need to return anything you must have all of the original packaging.
  5. READ & LOOK! At everything! Do it once & then do it again.
  6. REMEMBER WHAT "ARF" STANDS FOR. ARF means ALMOST Ready to Fly with an emphasis on ALMOST! Some assembly and modeling skills are required.
  7. ALLOW ENOUGH TIME to enjoy the assembly process! Rushing into a 6 hour job with 3 hours to spare simply will not work. This is a Hobby... take your time.
  8. DRY FIT & TEST ASSEMBLE EVERYTHING before you glue anything!
  9. USE 30 MINUTE EPOXY when joining wings & installing stabilizers and other structural components but only after you have dry fitted and test assembled the components without glue! Once parts are glued together they cannot be unglued and they cannot be returned or replaced without charge.
  10. PLAN AHEAD! BE CAREFUL! If you get into trouble, DON'T PANIC. Review everything again, talk it over with an experienced modeler and if still in difficulty consult our Support Services.
  11. TEST TEST!!! TUG TUG TUG!!! EVERYTHING... BEFORE & AFTER EACH FLIGHT! Your model may have been largely pre-constructed and may have pre-installed control rods, hinges, control surfaces and many other essential components. Hinges may have been pinned after they have been installed. However, you must double check every control surface and component before and after each flight. You and only you are responsible for the integrity of all components and the integrity of the model itself. Check everything before and after each flight. Tug on control surfaces, control rods, mounting bolts, T-nuts, mounting plates... tug on everything!
  12. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN WING BOLTS or other fasteners. You want bolts and nuts snugly tight and if metal you can use a medium grade thread locker such as Pacer Z42 to help them stay tight. Fasteners must be snug and secure. However a model airplane is not a farm tractor or a garbage compactor. You do not need a pipe wrench or an electric drill to tighten up wing bolts or any other fastener. Leave your plumbing and power tools at home.. hand tools only and go easy on the torque... snug and secure... not stripped or torqued until they squeak or break.  Wing bolts can take tremendous torque before breaking... but when you over tighten them or use an electric screw driver on a set of wing bolts, long before the bolts break you can fracture the fuselage, crack the mounting blocks or pull the heads of the bolts through the wing... these problems have a nasty habit of revealing themselves when you least expect the wing to fall off!
  13. DO NOT OVERPOWER ANY MODEL! Stay within the recommended power range for the model. If you overpower the model you run a high risk of structural failure that will lead to loss of control and a subsequent crash that will destroy the model and may cause injury and/or property damage.
  14. ASSUME NOTHING! Remember the old yarn about what happens when you ASS-U-ME something. Check everything repeatedly and frequently and DO NOT FLY any model unless you are satisfied that everything is in good working order.

 

10.32.1.2. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Supplement to the Manual

10.32.1.2.1. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Electric Power - Options
Question: My VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS Electric uses three motors. What do you recommend for a power system?
 
Answer: We have a couple of options for you to consider:
 
1) Our VMAX Power Module for the VMAR JU52 Trimotor is #VMM-J210XPM1. This consists of three of our VMAX Brushless Motors (#VMC-120B15VC) and three of our VMAX Electronic Speed Controls (ESC) (#VMC-120B15VC). Each motor and ESC has been factory mounted to a power pylon ready to mate with the wing.
 
2) Our VMAX Power Pack for the VMAR JU52 Trimotor (#VMM-J210XPP1) contains the Power Module plus a LiPO battery pack, tri-motor wiring harness, two receiver throttle Y harnesses and 3 propellers. .
 
Both of these options have been tested with the VMAR JU52 Trimotor and help you get into the air quickly and stay there!
 
 
10.32.1.2.2. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Electric Power - Wiring
Question: My VMAR VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS uses three electric motors. How should I wire these up so that I can control them from the single throttle channel on my receiver?
 
Answer: The simplest solution is to use our VMAX Power Pack which comes with brushless motors, electronic speed controls (ESC), battery pack, propellors etc and includes a custom made Wiring Harness Set for the power and control system. The Power Pack for the VMAR JU52 Trimotor is #VMM-J210XPP1.
 
If you have your own motors, servos, speed controls etc that you intend on using in the VMAR JU52 Trimotor, the manufacturer of these electric components is your best bet for advice on operating in a Triple Power configuration. The Wiring Harness Set for the VMAR JU52 Trimotor (#VMA-J210XWHS) is available as an aftermarket accessory and in most installations will make it much easier to work with the VMAX Power Module, third party motors, speed controls and servos.
 
If you have purchased the VMAX Power Pack for the JU52 Trimotor (#VMM-J210XPP1) please follow the installation instructions that come with the Power Pack. The VMAX Power Pack will save you hours and hours of time and greatly reduce the chances of making an expensive mistake.
 
If you are using third party power components, follow their instructions. In the absence of specific information from the manufacturer here are some general tips that may assist you. Remember, without specific information from the supplier of your Motors and ESC, you run the risk of doing something wrong and such booboos are usually expensive. Use our tips with this in mind. We can't verify that these tips will work with third party equipment and strongly encourage you to obtain information from the manufacturer of your Motors and ESC.
 
a) Use three idential Brushless Motors and three identical Electronic Speed Controls (ESC). Each motor should have its own speed control. (see footnote below)
 
b) Connect each ESC to a Brushless Motor using the color coded wire as a guide. Test and ensure that the motor turns in the direction expected and that thrust is aft of the motor.
 
c) Make a power Y3-connector to feed power from your LiPo battery to the power input leads on both of your ESC's. 
 
d) Use the power Y3-connector to connect the power input to the ESC's to a common (1) LiPO battery source.
 
e) Make a throttle Y3-connector (you can serially gang up two Y connectors). This is necessary for Triple ESC operation which assumes that you are using three motors and three ESC's.
 
For TRIPLE ESC operation use ONLY the NEGATIVE (-) Power (usually black or brown) & SIGNAL lines
(see table below) between the receiver throttle channel and the ESC's.
 
Do NOT use the POSITIVE (+) Power (usually Red) wires.  
The following table serves as a guide to common radio systems and their wiring schema and color usage. Use this table with caution. If in doubt, please defer to information provided by your radio supplier.  
 
RADIO BRAND NEGATIVE (-) SIGNAL
VRS & Futaba Black White
Airtronics Z Black Blue
JR Brown Orange
HiTec Black Yellow
f) Plug the ESC throttle control wires into the ends of the throttle Y3-connector
 
g) Plug the remaining single end of the throttle Y3 connector into your receiver throttle channel.  
 
h) Use the airborne battery pack from your radio system to power your receiver. Do NOT attempt to use power from either BEC to power your receiver. You may wish to consider using a stand alone BEC such as that from Western Robotics to power your radio system but do NOT use the BEC's that are a part of many ESC's. They will not work in a triple power configuration.
 
i) Select suitable propellers for your motors and your speed controllers. The three props should be identical. Prop selection is vital with brushless motors. Overloading the motors and ESC by using the wrong prop can get very very expensive in a big hurry.
 
j) Verify that you can control the RPM of the motors via the receiver and that they produce similar RPM and thrust throughout the throttle range.  
 
Footnote: There may be some triple ESC's that enable you to control three Brushless motors from one ESC. These eliminates the need for a second and third ESC and may make the installation of third party components simpler. If you are using a triple ESC, ensure that you follow the manufacturers instructions regarding wiring and operations.
 
 
 
10.32.1.3. VMA-T210X Twin Otter 09-15 ARF - Important Information

 

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.32.1.3.1. VMA-T210X Twin Otter 09-15 ARF - Covering

This model uses POLYCOTE ECS Covering

POLYCOTE ECS - Care & Maintenance - Quick Tips

Question: Do you have any pointers regarding the Care & Maintenance of POLYCOTE ECS?

Answer: Yes we have this Summary of Quick Tips. See www.richmondrc.com ( Enter Site > Support Services > Knowledge Base then Search on "Covering") for an expanded explanation of each Tip.

Polyester offers the best in covering performance and as with any new modern technology, the maintenance methods may be different than those you used with your older covering. This is NOT Monokote or Solarfilm, its different. If you have used ORACOVER or ULTRACOTE you will have some experience with working with POLYESTER as a covering material.

Here is our Summary of Quick Tips related to POLYCOTE ECS covering.

  • Avoid Hot Vehicles
    • Cooking your model in your vehicle for hours on end is generally not a good idea! Temperatures can easily exceed 50C (122 F) under such conditions. You will get sags. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to remove sags.  
  • Cleaning After Flying
    • We recommend Fantastic household cleaner and disposable paper towels. Mist, do not flood. Wipe along seams, not across. Do NOT NOT NOT NOT use SIMPLE GREEN, 409 or similar materials for cleaning a model airplane.
  • Cleaning Initially
    • Upon initial inspection if you see a thin streaky film on any of the POLYCOTE ECS, work outdoors and use a paper towel and wipe a slightly wet film of Mineral Spirits over 1/4 of a wing or half a fuselage at a time. Rub gently while still wet. Change towels frequently. Avoid plastics.
  • Cutting
    • Use sharp scissors or an XACTO knife with a sharp #11 blade.
  • Pealing
    • Relatively rare. Fix as soon as possible. Consult our Knowledge Base before attempting to resolve.
  • Protecting the Finish
    • Most Importantly - Follow the cleaning instructions. Use the recommended cleaners and method. Dab away raw fuel. Test small out of the way area and all plastics before applying any glue, solvent, cleaner, paint or other preparation. Patch punctures promptly. Avoid hours and hours sitting in the direct sun.
  • Removing & Using Tape
    • Use low tack tape. When removing tape , peal the tape back on itself parallel to the surface of the covering.
  • Repairing Punctures
    •  Patch promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area of the puncture. Patch should be 1/2" (13mm) bigger on all sides. Round the corners. Seal in place with a heat iron & sock. Tighten area with a Heat Gun.
  • Resealing Seams
    • Act promptly. Clean any oil residue from the area and reseal the seam with thin CA.
  • Tightening Sags
    • Remember SSB... SECURE the perimeter then SHRINK to fit then BOND to the structure. Use an iron with sock to SECURE the perimeter, use a heat gun to SHRINK within the perimeter, use a soft cloth while the covering is warm to BOND the covering to solid substrates.
  • Tools for Working with POLYCOTE ECS
    • Scissors, XACTO with #11 blade, iron, iron sock, regulated heat gun, soft cotton cloth or glove.
10.32.1.4. Support

On Line, eMail, Fax, Phone, Mail

We offer the Best in Support Services.
We back up our products and our customers with the best support services available. From our industry leading Knowledge Base to information about your Shipment, we've got you covered!
 
To access our Support Services please:
Your Choice of Support Services that Work for You: 
10.32.1.4.1. Contact Us

For Sales and other Inquiries  

Support - Contact Us - Reach our Sales Department by eMail, Fax, Phone or Mail

Technical Inquiries:

Please review the information provided in our Knowledge Base. After checking our Knowledge Base, if you need further assistance please use our Submit A Question service to get a response within 2 Business Days.

 

Sales Inquiries: 

Please note that our Sales Department personnel are trained and dedicated to:

  • Helping you with non-technical pre-purchase questions,
  • Helping you place your order,
  • Pointing out any sales, combos or specials that you may wish to consider,
  • Inputting your order to our computer system so that it ships out as accurately and quickly as possible... usually the same day,  
  • Resolving any invoicing problems, and
  • Helping to sort out any missing shipment or shipment damage issues.
Their depth of technical knowledge is about on par with what is shown in our printed sales literature. In most cases, they are working from the same printed advertisements or content from our web site that you are. Asking sales personnel to confirm the size, color and availability of a product is well within their capabilities. However, asking detailed questions about technical issues is not.

 

To Buy our Products: 
  • From a Retailer
    • Please support your local retailer.    
  • On Line 24x7x365
  • By Fax 24x7x365
    • 604-940-1063
  • By Phone M-F 11am-4pm Pacific Time
    • Order Desk 604-940-1066          

For All Other Inquiries:

  • Please consult the following resources:
  • After reviewing our On Line resources, if you require additional assistance please contact us by eMail, fax, phone or mail as follows:

    • Ask a Question
    • eMail:
    • Fax
      • 604-940-1063
    • Phone
      • 604-940-1066
    • Mail
      • Richmond RC Supply Ltd, #114 - 7350 72nd Street, Delta, BC, V4G-1H9
        • Mail & printed correspondence only.                
        • We are not able to accomodate personal site visits or drop-offs/pick-ups at this location.
        • Please note that all inbound Shipments require pre-Authorization in advance.
        • Unauthorized inbound shipments will be refused.        

 
10.32.1.5. Keep Up to Date

Check Frequently for Updates

Support - Stay Current - Check Frequently for Updated &/or Additional Information
This information is subject to change without notice. When viewing this information in a printed form the printing date will be visible in the lower right corner. Check frequently for updates &/or Additional Information.at www.richmondrc.com, > Enter the Site, > Support Services, follow the links to our Knowledge Base. Review the Table of Contents and search for the name and/or part number of this product.
 
For automated notification of changes to information contained in our Knowledge Base please register as a Priority Response member and subscribe to our Priority Response Notification Service.
10.32.2. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Additional Information

In general "Additional" Information is:

  • In addition to that found in other documentation related to this product,
  • Often reflects feedback &/or questions from users of the product.

Subject to the Conditions of Use, please review the attachments and related articles listed below.

COPYRIGHT
Copyright Richmond RC Supply Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
10.32.2.1. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Extra Hardware Items
Question: I have completed the assembly of my  VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor and I have a few extra hardware items such as horns, screws and wing bolts. What are these for?
 
Answer: We usually include a few extra horns and wing bolts with all VMAR ARF's. You may also find a spare clevis and a couple of small screws depending on the model. These are free and intended to help you out if you drop or misplace one of these small items. If you have followed all of the assembly steps, completed your model, tested that your radio and control surfaces all move correctly, tug tested everything twice, just put any of extra hardware pieces in one of the bags and set it aside as spares just in case you need them later on. Don't throw anything out, you just never know when that screw, horn or nut may be needed!
10.32.2.2. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Hinges - Spares Available
Question: I have snagged one of my control surfaces when tranporting my VMAR JU52 Trimotor. This resulted in breaking one of the hinges. The hinges are intended to be scale like and are not a regular hinge. Are the hinges available as a spare part?
 
Answer: Yes hinges are available as a spare part. For a package of hinges for replacement of the variety of unique hinges on the VMAR JU52 Trimotor please order #VMA-J210XHS1
10.32.2.3. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Glow Power - Tips
Question: Can I use glow engines to power my VMAR JU52 Trimotor? If so what sizes are recommended? Any tips you can suggest on what I need to plan for? 
 
Answer: Yes the VMAR JU52 Trimotor can be powered with glow engines. We suggest glow engines be at least .09 cu. in. each as a minimum. Maximum engine size should be limited to .15 cu. in. each for those on the wings and limited to .25 cu. in. for that in the nose of the fuselae. Please note that setting up and operating multiple glow engines is not for novices. It requires considerable expertise with modeling, glow engines and RC flying to be able to successfully equip and fly the VMAR JU52 Trimotor with glow engines.

Tips on use of glow power:
 
1) We recommend two stroke engines for this model. Four stroke engines tend to be bigger and heavier and they may cause structural failure of the standard wood engine mounting pylons.
 
2) You will need to plan your fuel tanks and engine mounting system with careful consideration for physical space particularly if you wish to try to install the engines so that you can utilize the scale like engine shrouds and nacelles.
 
3) Do NOT permanently attach the engine mounting pylons (factory assembled of wood) to the wing or fuselage until you have test fitted the engine mounting pylons, engine mounts, engines, mufflers, fuel tanks, fuel tubing, throttle linkages, engine shrouds and nacelles.
 
4) Once you have test fitted all of the components related to the glow engines, follow the instructions in the assembly and operations manual to attach the engine pylons to the wing and fuselage.  Ensure they are aligned and fitted properly. Let adhesives used cure thoroughly before proceeding.
 
5) Use Pacer Finishing Resin and a brush to throughly seal any exposed wood, particularly that of the engine mounting pylons and the attachment area on the wing and fuselage. Also the wing saddle area. The exhaust from glow engines contains lots of hot vapourized and liquid oil residue. Although most of this oil will be channeled out in the exhaust, some oil will inevitably get on the model itself and will be absorbed by any unsealed wood. Oil can weaken glue joints and the wood itself.
 
6) Glow engines tend to produce considerable vibration particularly in a twin configuration when the engines are not quite at the same RPM. Take particular care to balance your props and to run the engines at the same RPM when compared to each other throughout the range of throttle positions. Vibration can cause fuel feed problems, lean runs and engine cut off as well as structural failure, control surface flutter and/or separation and is very damaging to servos. It is very important to keep vibration to a minimum.
 
 
 
 
10.32.3. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Assembly & Operations Manual in PDF format
10.32.4. VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Pictures, Graphics & Artwork
10.32.4.1. Logo VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS
10.32.4.1.1. Logo (CMYK_TIF) VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS
10.32.4.2. Pictures VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Lufthansa
10.32.4.2.1. Pictures (CMYK_TIF) VMA-J210X JU52 Trimotor 64in ARF ECS - Lufthansa
10.33. VMA-M340U P51D Mustang 40 ARF - Big Beautiful Doll

 

10.33.1. VMA-M340U Mustang - Retract Ready - Cutouts or Not? New Fixed Gear Mounting Method.
Question: Is the #VMA-M340U P51D Mustang retract ready? Have there been different configurations and different fixed gear sets supplied in the kit?
 
Answer: Yes to both questions.
 
Better Answer: Yes the VMAR #VMA-M340U Mustang is retract ready. All except the earliest models made prior to mid 2003.
 
There have been a number of variations of the factory implementation of the retract cavities.
 
Mustangs made from mid 2003 to the summer of 2004 had the cavities cut out at the factory and lined with plastic inserts and a set of flat covers were provided that modelers could attach with ZAP or Pacer Dap-A-Goo (works best) if retracts were not being installed.  
 
Beginning summer 2004, the factory pre-installed the retract rails etc then they are covered over. Modelers who wish to install retracts can cut away the covering and install the plastic cavity inserts ONLY if they wish to install retracts. The plastic cavity inserts are included in the kit. We recommend Pacer Dap-A-Goo for installing the cavity inserts. Always test fit and test a small amount of any adhesive on any plastic and covering before proceeding.
 
When the VMAR Mustang 45-60 ARF was made retract ready, the fixed gear that comes with the kit were changed to allow the fixed gear to be bolted into a standard block mounting cavity that could later accomodate optional retracts. The instruction book may show wire fixed gear being fitted into slots in the wing. This is correct for models produced prior to mid 2003. Since mid 2003 the fixed gear uses a block mounting system with screws (4/wing) instead of the slots and clamps used in earlier production.
10.33.2. Cowl - Detailing - Strips applied in Checkerboard Pattern

Question: I have purchased a VMAR P51D Mustang with Big Beautiful Doll graphics. The cowl in the picture has a checkerboard pattern. How is this done?

Answer: The cowl comes pre-painted in a silver color with a roll of black and white strips that are used for the checkerboard pattern. The strips are rolled up and usually in the nose of the cowl when shipped or in the parts bag.

Better Answer: First lay out either the white or black strips in lines on the cowl. Just do one of the colors for now. Mask out what you want to keep of the first color and using a sharp knife cut away the excess. Now lay the second set of colored strips down into the cutout areas and again cut away the excess leaving a checkboard pattern of white and black squares.

10.33.3. VMA-M340U P51D Mustang 40-52ARF - Plastic Scoop and Fairing Placement

Question: I have a VMAR P51D 45-52 ARF. This ARF comes with what looks like an airscoop and another plastic plate like fairing. Where do these go and how do I attach them?

Answer: Both of these trim pieces go on the bottom of the wing. We recommend attaching the wing to the fuselage before applying the trim pieces.

Both pieces are to be centered over the wing joint seam.

The plate like fairing is to be applied near the leading edge of the wing with the flat face forward so that it butts up against the fuselage.

The air scoop is to be applied near the trailing edge of the wing with the scoop inlet facing forward and about 1/4" of overhanging flashing at the back of the scoop overlapping the fuselage. When correctly positioned and overhanging the fuselage at the back, the wing bolts will be accessible with the scoop remaining in place.

Dry mount both pieces and if necessary trim the fit with a sharp #11 blade.

Once dry fitting well, glue the trim pieces to the wing with Pacer Dap-A-Goo. This is a silicone like material that dries flexible and sticks well to the trim pieces and the covering. Apply the Dap-A-Goo to the trim pieces in a thin bead just inboard from the outer edge. Do not apply Dap-A-Goo to the flashing of the airscoop that overlaps on to the fuselage. Apply the fairing first. Wipe away any excess Dap-A-Goo and secure firmly with low tack masking tape. Then apply the scoop and secure with low tack masking tape. Let dry for several hours and then remove the tape by pealing it back upon itself. Do NOT pull the tape off at right angles to the surface to which it is stuck.

 

10.34. VMA-M490R Mig 21 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF 3DS - USSR
10.34.1. VMA-M490R Mig 21 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Extra Wood Servo Tray Parts - What are they for?

Question:  My Mig 21 included some parts that look like two servo tray sets made from plywood. What these for?

Answer: The Mig21 is retract ready. The extra plywood servo tray sets are for retract servos if fitted and can be placed where ever suitable for your retract setup and your servos

10.34.2. VMA-M490R Mig 21 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Landing Gear Mounting Screws - What Size?

Question: My Mig 21 came with fixed landing gear pre-mounted into blocks with a metal retaining plate. There are also pre-drilled mounting holes in the wing and fuselage that match with the retaining plate. What screws do you recommend for attaching the gear to the wing and fuselage?

Answer: Early production runs of the Mig 21 came with 12 metric Phillips head wood screws. Depending on market preferences around the world some modelers did not like the Phillips head and other modelers did not like the metric threads. The factory no longer provides the screws with the model leaving the choice of screws open the modeller.

Generally we suggest a pan head #6 or #8 wood or self tapping sheet metal screw about 5/8" long. Try the #6 first. Thread it into the pre-drilled holes and ensure that it bites into the mounting rail wood properly. If it does... go with the #6 screws. If the pre-drilled holes are too large for a #6 screw, try a #8 but if it is a tight fit, do not screw it in all the way. Back it out and redrill the holes first. You do NOT want to split the rails by forcing a large screw into a small pilot hole.

 

10.34.3. VMA-M490R Mig 21 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Lock Nuts for Wing - Superceded by new Wing Nuts

Question: On page two of the Assembly and Operators Manual that came with my Mig21 (version 20050329 per back cover) there is mention of four lock nuts in addition to four butterfly nuts. I cannot find these four lock nuts. What should I do?

Answer: The lock nuts were difficult to install and remove when used in conjunction with butterfly nuts. We are now using a better grade of butterfly nuts that do not require the use of additional lock nuts. Lock nuts are no longer included with the Mig21. If you do not wish to remove the wings for transport and want a longer term solution to ensure the butterfly nuts remain snug, use medium thread locker such as Z42 from Pacer.

In any event, check the butterfly nuts before each flying outing to ensure they are snug (do not overtighten or you will strip the studs) and retain the wing securely attached to the fuselage.

 

 

10.34.4. VMA-M490R Mig 21 60-91 Jet (Prop) ARF - Engine Mounts - Where are they?

Question: I can not find the engine mounts for my Mig 21. What should I do?

Answer: Th